​New Tool Allows Consumers to Offset the Carbon Footprint of their Vacation, Lifestyle and Life EventsArlington, VA (July 27, 2017) – Conservation International today announced the launch of its new…
​New Tool Allows Consumers to Offset the Carbon Footprint of their Vacation, Lifestyle and Life Events

Arlington, VA (July 27, 2017) – Conservation International today announced the launch of its new carbon calculator. Using the latest data, the user-friendly tool, made possible with support from SC Johnson, was designed to better measure specific lifestyle choices, allowing users to calculate their carbon footprint based on a range of household behaviors.

The carbon calculator is the first of its kind to connect users directly to the carbon market to purchase offsets that will help protect forests.

The world’s forests currently store more carbon than is in the entire atmosphere.  Yet deforestation continues to contribute 11% of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions – more than all passenger cars combined. Through the purchase of carbon offsets via the calculator, users can help stop deforestation and fight climate change in places like Chyulu Hills, Kenya, the Ambositra-Vondrozo Forest Corridor, Madagascar, and Alto Mayo, Peru, while supporting local communities whose livelihoods depend on nature.

“The future of climate action rests on all of us and the choices we make,” says Conservation International’s climate lead Shyla Raghav. “Con​​servation International’s carbon calculator was redesigned based on user feedback to more accurately measure impact and to engage users more directly in being part of the solution by investing in the protection of critical forests around the world.”

As part of the launch of the carbon calculator, Conservation International announced​ the sale of 2 million carbon credits in Chyulu Hills, Kenya, an iconic landscape​ that served as the inspiration for Ernest Hemingway’s “Green Hills of Africa.” Located between Amboseli and Tsavo National Parks, Chyulu Hills is an integral part of Kenya’s ecosystem that has been severely impacted by overgrazing, drought and deforestation. The revenue generated from the sale of carbon credits will help reduce deforestation and protect forests in Chyulu Hills, while empowering the communities that live there to manage their natural resources more sustainably.

To calculate your carbon footprint, start here: www.conservation.org/carboncalculator.​

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​​Arlington, Va. (July 26, 2017) – Chyulu Hills, the iconic Kenyan landscape that served as the inspiration for Ernest Hemingway's "Green Hills of Africa", will soon be able to benefit…
​​Arlington, Va. (July 26, 2017) – Chyulu Hills, the iconic Kenyan landscape that served as the inspiration for Ernest Hemingway’s “Green Hills of Africa”, will soon be able to benefit from the sale of 2 million carbon credits. Revenue from the sale of carbon credits will be re-invested into community conservation efforts. The project is completely led and managed by the local land owners, including indigenous Maasai communities, NGO partners and Kenya’s national parks and forest institutions. 

Located between Amboseli and Tsavo National Parks, Chyulu Hills is an integral part of Kenya’s largest conservation landscape that has been severely impacted by overgrazing, drought, deforestation and forest degradation. It is home to traditional pastoralist Maasai, small scale farmers and many of Africa’s most iconic species including endangered rhinos and elephants. Chyulu Hills’ springs serve as a critical freshwater source for local communities, wildlife and livestock, as well over 1 million people living in the downstream city of Mombasa.  

The revenue generated from the sale of carbon credits, available for sale to corporations and individuals via Conservation International’s Carbon Calculator will help reduce deforestation and protect forests and natural resources. It will also support employment of forest and game rangers, safeguard the Chyulu Hills water catchment and provide communities with improved social services in health and education, employment and business opportunities. 

“The Maasai communities strongly support this project and it is an important opportunity to further clearly demonstrate building our local economy based on protecting the natural environment, living sustainably, and maintaining our cultural link to the land while promising a better future for generations to come,” said Samson Parashina, Maasai leader and Chairman of Chyulu Hills Conservation Trust.

“This initiative has the potential to be life changing for forest and rangelands-dependent communities who lack other economic alternatives. The carbon credit program activities will help ensure the protection of the forests, which is critical to sustaining both communities and wildlife,” said Christina Ender, Conservation International’s Senior Technical Manager for Payments for Ecosystem Services.

The project is managed by the Chyulu Hills Conservation Trust, a unique coalition of government, community and non-profit partners including the Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya Forest Service, Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust, Big Life Foundation and the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. Conservation International will continue to serve as a technical advisor and help market the credits to corporations and individuals.

“This project creates two very significant opportunities, simultaneously: It paves the way for ecosystem-scale conservation efforts to finally grow beyond perpetual dependency on philanthropic grant funding and finally be underwritten sustainably and long-term by cutting edge market economic models,” said Edward Norton, United Nations Goodwill Ambassador for Biodiversity and President Maasai Wilderness Conservation Fund.  And in parallel, it offers not just responsible companies, but also individuals, a way to offset their carbon footprint with an unprecedented level of credibility and confidence. I’d like to see every one of these credits sold to some great, progressive companies and a grassroots army of people committed to addressing this global challenge who refuse to wait on politicians and know we have to act in ways like this that don’t require permission.”

“Rarely does a project protect critical natural habitats and species, support vibrant human communities, and measurably address climate change, but the Chyulu Hills carbon offset program does all of that and more,” said Terry Taminen, CEO, Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and former Secretary of the California Environmental Protection Agency. “I applaud all of the partners who made this great project possible and, if others follow in their footsteps throughout Africa and worldwide, there is real hope that we can address our shared climate change and sustainability challenges before it’s too late.”

This initiative builds on the success of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degredation (REDD+), a climate change mitigation framework that incentivizes landowners to protect forests and natural resources. The project has completed its first verification in accordance with the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) and the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards (CCBS).

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About Chyulu Hills Conservation Trust
The Chyulu Hills Conservation Trust oversees the Chyulu Hills REDD+ Project, a multi-partner, community-led initiative designed to promote climate change mitigation and adaptation, restore biodiversity and create alternative livelihoods by limiting deforestation. Trust members include four indigenous Maasai community groups, Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya Forest Service and three leading Kenyan conservation NGOs: Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust, Big Life Foundation, and David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. 

​Auckland, New Zealand (July 17, ​​2017) — Conservation International (CI) welcomes the Cook Islands government’s decision to legally establish Marae Moana. Five years of close consultation between the government, partners…
​Auckland, New Zealand (July 17, ​​2017) — Conservation International (CI) welcomes the Cook Islands government’s decision to legally establish Marae Moana. Five years of close consultation between the government, partners and local communities has resulted in Marae Moana, becoming the world’s largest multiple-use marine park — a remarkable stride towards the protection of their oceans which provide food security and livelihoods to the people of Cook Islands. 

The Parliament of the Cook Islands passed the Marae Moana Act 2017 on July 12, 2017
formally establishes the Marine Park which spans both the northern and southern Cook Islands
and maritime jurisdiction, an area of 1.9 million square kilometers — the entire marine domain of
the Cook Islands. 

“Marae Moana is a unique, large scale Marine Protected Area that ensures protection of the
marine environment whist allowing for the sustainable development aspirations of Cook
Islanders. By doing so, it empowers traditional knowledge and practice as a key basis for
management. In short, Marae Moana is an unparalleled approach. Now that the Marae Moana
Act 2017 is legislated, we will continue to forge ahead, hand in hand with our Cook Island
Partners to support this globally significant commitment to the Pacific Oceanscape​,” said David
Emmett, Senior Vice President of Conservation International’s Asia-Pacific Field Division. 

CI has supported the development of a Cook Islands Marine Park since the idea’s inception in
2011 as part of CI’s engagement in the Pacific Oceanscape, an initiative of the Pacific Islands
Forum Leaders. The Marae Moana is the Cook Islands’ commitment to the Pacific Oceanscape
declared in 2012. CI continues to support government, traditional leaders and the Marae MoanaInformation Hub, which raises public awareness and conducts consultation for the Marine Park. 

Moving forward, Conservation International will continue to work with Marae Moana
coordinators, the Office of the Prime Minister, and the House of Ariki (the council of high chiefs)
to gain information on customary knowledge and traditional practices used in marine
management and conservation, known as Ra’ui — informing management plans to ensure the
sustainability of the Cook Islands’ oceans. 

“Mankind only has one earth, one atmosphere, and one global ocean. One last chance to save
it all for future generations,” said Prime Minister of Cook Islands, Henry Puna, at the United
Nations Sustainable Development Goals 14 Conference in New York last month. 

The Act, which builds upon the launch of the Marine Park in 2012 and five years of consultation
between government, communities, the private sector and non-profits, also extends the ban on
foreign commercial fishing fleets in all 15 islands in the Exclusive Economic Zone from 12
nautical miles to 50 nautical miles, providing further protection for about 17,000 people who
depend upon these waters for food, livelihoods and traditional uses. 

### 

Photos and Video Available for Media Download here.

For more on Conservation International’s work on Marae Moana, visit here​.

For more information, contact:
Nicole Han, Communications and Partnerships Manager, Conservation International
Office +65 6733 2546/ mobile +65 9828 1538/ email nhan@conservation.org 

Kevin Iro, Marae Moana Ambassador
Phone +682 5433 / email kliro5@yahoo.co.nz 

About Conservation International 
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​Arlington, Va. (July 13, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) today signed an agreement​ with the Green Climate Fund, taking a critical step in the fight against global climate change. The Green…
​Arlington, Va. (July 13, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) today signed an agreement​ with the Green Climate Fund, taking a critical step in the fight against global climate change. The Green Climate Fund, a funding mechanism within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), invests in programs that help developing countries become climate-resilient and to reduce emissions.

The agreement paves the way for CI to launch a 10-year, multimillion dollar sustainable landscapes management program that will improve the resiliency of climate-vulnerable smallholder farmers, reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and leverage private sector climate investments.

“Conservation International is delighted to sign our Accreditation Master Agreement with the Green Climate Fund. This is a critical step in helping us address climate change – the most urgent environmental and social issue of our time,” said CI President Jennifer Morris. “CI has a long history of using nature-based solutions to combat climate change in countries around the world least able to cope with a changing climate. Joining forces with the GCF provides us with additional financial means to expand our reach and increase our impact, which will include the launch of a first of its kind public-private investment program to stimulate investment in climate-resilient land use in Madagascar, our first approved GCF project.”

Madagascar is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change in the world, with small-holder farmers bearing the brunt of the impact. Much of the country’s rich biodiversity and forest-rich landscape has been depleted due to climate change and poor landscape management practices.

“Conservation International’s rich experience in reducing deforestation and improving agricultural practices will be a welcome addition to the Fund’s growing capacity to deal with climate change,” said Green Climate Fund Executive Director Howard Bamsey.

The Green Climate Fund was established during the 2010 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Mexico as a fund within the UNFCCC framework. A master agreement between GCF and an accredited organization establishes guidelines for projects and financing. Conservation International is among the first conservation organizations to receive an accreditation and to sign a master agreement with the Fund.

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About the Green Climate Fund
The Green Climate Fund (GCF) is a new global fund created to support the efforts of developing countries to respond to the challenge of climate change. GCF helps developing countries limit or reduce their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and adapt to climate change. It seeks to promote a paradigm shift to low-emission and climate-resilient development, taking into account the needs of nations that are particularly vulnerable to climate change impacts.

 

​Rapid sea ice loss, coastal protections reduction caused declines in ocean health in many Arctic and sub-Arctic countriesArlington, Va. (July 5, 2017) While global ocean health has remained relatively stable…

​Rapid sea ice loss, coastal protections reduction caused declines in ocean health in many Arctic and sub-Arctic countries

Arlington, Va. (July 5, 2017) While global ocean health has remained relatively stable over the past five years, individual countries have seen notable changes, according to a study published today in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. Benjamin Halpern from University of California Santa Barbara, Johanna Polsenberg, senior director of the Ocean Health Index at Conservation International (CI) and other colleagues.

Using an innovative tool developed by CI and National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) called the Ocean Health Index, the researchers found global ocean wellness flatlined at a score of 71 out of 100, which indicates that oceans aren’t dying but neither are they thriving.

Called the “Fitbit for oceans”, the Ocean Health index has been used to assess ocean health on the local and regional scale, measuring factors such as biodiversity, coastal protection and clean waters to help inform regional policies. In this study, Halpern, Polsenberg and colleagues analyzed five years’ worth of data for 220 countries, seeking potential drivers and implications for the changes that they observed.

That global ocean health has been fairly stable over the past five years is not unexpected since the health of the world’s oceans does not change rapidly over a relatively short time period.  What was notable were changes individual countries. For example, rapid loss of sea ice and the consequent reduction of coastal protection from that sea ice was responsible for declines in overall ocean health in many Arctic and sub-Arctic countries.  Meanwhile, improvements in the management of wild-caught fisheries, the creation of marine protected areas and decreases in the harvest of natural products, or non-food products like sponges and seashells, were among the factors attributed to improvements in other coastal countries.

“Each year we do this assessment we learn something about where oceans are healthy and not as healthy, and get a little more insight into what might be causing those changes,” said Dr. Ben Halpern, lead author of the study, professor and research biologist at the Marine Science Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara. “But with five years of assessment we finally have enough information to get a clear signal of what’s going on. Countries that are seeing notable improvement in their oceans are taking concrete actions to make things better, like creating marine protected areas. This is the first anyone has been able to do this – measure the health of our oceans in a comprehensive way and track changes with a single measure.”

While the Ocean Health Index at Conservation International was capable of predicting short term changes in global ocean health, the authors suggest that investment in additional resources for measuring changes on a global scale would greatly help with management and protection of ocean health.

“We believe the Ocean Health Index gives reason for hope by providing a detailed diagnosis of the state of ocean health and a framework that allows countries to identify and prioritize the most necessary resilience actions to improve ocean health – now and for the future,” says Polsenberg.

About NCEAS
The National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis engages the best minds in ecology to address critical global challenges affecting nature and human well-being. It nurtures the discovery of breakthrough ideas and solutions by bringing together interdisciplinary teams of scientists to synthesize existing data and reap new insights. Established in 1995 and affiliated with UC Santa Barbara, it was the first synthesis science center of its kind and has helped transform how scientists do research for the benefit of nature and people. Learn more about NCEAS and follow us on Twitter.  

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

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​Arlington, Va. (June 20, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International (CI), on CI joining Climate Leadership Council as…
​Arlington, Va. (June 20, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International (CI), on CI joining Climate Leadership Council as a Founding Member.

“Today, Conservation International is proud to become a Founding Member of the Climate Leadership Council. The Climate Leadership Council has put together a wide-ranging coalition from the business and NGO communities to distinguished thought leaders in support of a carbon dividend plan that puts a price on carbon. This market-based approach benefits the environment by encouraging the reduction of carbon emissions and benefits the American people by providing them with a carbon dividend. Climate change poses real threats to nature and the vital services it provides to people such as food and fresh water. Conservation International welcomes innovative ideas that can lead to the reduction of carbon emissions and the mitigation of the impacts of a changing climate while protecting the American economy.”

About Conservation International
C​onservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​Innovative Virtual Reality Film Offered Viewers an Unprecedented Immersive Experience, Included a Call-to-Action to Help Save Rainforest  ​RACINE, Wis., June 7, 2017 – With Amazon rainforest deforestation once again on the…

Innovative Virtual Reality Film Offered Viewers an Unprecedented Immersive Experience, Included a Call-to-Action to Help Save Rainforest  ​

RACINE, Wis., June 7, 2017 – With Amazon rainforest deforestation once again on the rise, SC Johnson and Conservation International (CI) announced today they have completed the largest acre-for-acre match program to conserve the Amazon rainforest. SC Johnson’s match campaign will help CI preserve 10,000 acres of rainforest in the Amazon region.

The acre-for-acre campaign was promoted in conjunction with SC Johnson’s sponsorship of Under the Canopy, an immersive 360-degree virtual reality film that allows viewers to experience the wonders of the Amazon. The film, co-produced by CI and leading cinematic virtual reality company Jaunt, explores the extraordinary landscape of Amazonia guided by the indigenous people who inhabit the region and are essential to its protection. It has been seen by more than half a million viewers worldwide.

The funds from the match campaign – which garnered donations from all 50 U.S. states and 31 countries through CI’s website – will be used to protect tropical forests and replant approximately 3 million trees in the Amazon region.

“We are encouraged by the public response to Under the Canopy and to support efforts to save the Amazon rainforest. It is our hope that we can continue to inspire others to help protect this vital resource for future generations,” said Fisk Johnson, Chairman and CEO of SC Johnson.

The completion of the campaign comes as deforestation in the Amazon is on the rise. Since 2012, deforestation rates have trended upward, with a 29 percent increase last year, much of it in Brazil.  Currently, the Amazon rainforest loses 3.7 million acres-per year – forests that provide habitat for 10 percent of the world’s known species and that account for a significant portion of carbon dioxide absorbed by land each year.

Under the Canopy brings viewers to the heart of the Amazon rainforest and inspires them to protect this irreplaceable resource,” said Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International. “By supporting our Protect an Acre campaign, SC Johnson turned this inspiration into action, engaging viewers around the world in preserving this forest for the benefit of us all.”

Partnership with Conversation International

In 2009, SC Johnson became a founding member of Conservation International’s Team Earth, a worldwide sustainability effort uniting businesses, non-profit organizations, experts and individuals to address the most pressing environmental issues. SC Johnson has also worked with CI through its REDD+ program in the Peruvian Amazon to engage communities in conservation, safeguarding forests and securing livelihoods while offsetting carbon emissions.

SC Johnson, Deforestation and Brazil
As a member of the Consumer Goods Forum, SC Johnson shares its commitment to net zero deforestation by 2020 through the sustainable sourcing of pulp, paper, packaging and palm oil. The company also helped protect two reserves in Brazil’s Caatinga ecoregion in the 1990s.

In 1935, third-generation company leader H.F. Johnson Jr. led an expedition to South America to study the Carnaúba palm, whose wax was the principle ingredient in the company’s products at that time. Several decades later, fourth-generation leader Sam Johnson and his sons, including fifth-generation leader Fisk Johnson, retraced the expedition made by H.F. Johnson Jr.  

This new effort with CI also fits with SC Johnson’s commitment to reducing its own impact:

  • Since 2000, SC Johnson has cut greenhouse gas emissions from its global manufacturing sites by 51.7 percent.
  • More about SC Johnson’s sustainability progress can be found in the company’s 2016 Sustainability Report, its 25th annual report on environmental and social efforts.

About SC Johnson
SC Johnson is a family company dedicated to innovative, high-quality products, excellence in the workplace and a long-term commitment to the environment and the communities in which it operates. Based in the USA, the company is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of household cleaning products and products for home storage, air care, pest control and shoe care, as well as professional products. It markets such well-known brands as GLADE®, KIWI®, OFF!®, PLEDGE®, RAID®, SCRUBBING BUBBLES®, SHOUT®, WINDEX® and ZIPLOC® in the U.S. and beyond, with brands marketed outside the U.S. including AUTAN®, TANA®, BAMA®, BAYGON®, BRISE®, KABIKILLER®, KLEAR®, MR MUSCLE® and RIDSECT®. The 131-year-old company, which generates $10 billion in sales, employs approximately 13,000 people globally and sells products in virtually every country around the world. www.scjohnson.com

About Conservation International (CI)

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all.

CI’s first VR film, “Valen’s Reef,” tells the story of one of the most successful community-driven conservation projects in the world in the world, the Bird’s Head Seascape Initiative in Indonesia. More than 2.0 million people have viewed “Valen’s Reef since its release in June 2016. Learn more about CI, “Valen’s Reef,” and the “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

 


​Arlington, Va. (June, 1, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International: "President Trump's decision today to begin the process…
​Arlington, Va. (June, 1, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International:

“President Trump’s decision today to begin the process of withdrawing from the Paris Agreement is a setback for the national and economic security of the United States. It prevents our nation from having a seat at the table as the global community creates solutions for addressing climate change. This decision isolates the United States, just as our allies and our citizens most need to come together to design new technologies and new ways to manage the ecological health of our extraordinary home, Earth.

Fortunately, the president’s action will not undo the momentum coming from businesses, investors, governme​nts and citizens all around the world to address climate change. The Paris Agreement remains a pillar of international cooperation, backed by nearly every nation on Earth. Already, China and the European Union are asserting renewed leadership to lead the world forward on climate. The agreement also remains a guiding light for millions of Americans, our business community and states for addressing this shared challenge. Governments that work to address the factors of climate change will benefit from cleaner energy, healthier populations and stronger economies. As we forge ahead, Conservation International’s climate commitment — built upon a strong foundation of science and field demonstration — is to encourage and to engage with partners around the globe to reduce the threat of climate change by protecting the forests and ecosystems that can provide at least 30 percent of the solution needed to avoid the worst effects of climate change.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Arlington, Va. (June 1, 2017) -- As the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human…
Arlington, Va. (June 1, 2017) — As the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human rights violations in the seafood industry. Authored by Conservation International and a team of researchers at leading organizations, the paper is the first integrated approach to meeting this global challenge and will be presented as part of the UN Oceans Conference and the Seafood Summit, which both take place June 5-9 in New York and Seattle, respectively.

The article, published today in the journal Science, is in direct response to investigative reports by the Associated Press, The Guardian, The New York Times and other media outlets that uncovered glaring human rights violations on fishing vessels. The investigations tracked the widespread use of slave labor in Southeast Asia and its role in bringing seafood to American restaurants and supermarkets, chronicling the plight of fishermen tricked and trapped into working 22-hour days, often without pay and while enduring abuse. Subsequent investigations have documented the global extent of these abuses in a wide array of countries. 

“The scientific community has not kept pace with concerns for social issues in the seafood sector,” said Jack Kittinger, CI’s Senior Director, Global Fisheries and Aquaculture. “The purpose of this initiative is to ensure that governments, businesses, and nonprofits are working together to improve human rights, equality and food and livelihood security. This is a holistic and comprehensive approach that establishes a global standard to address these social challenges.”

As part of the initiative, Conservation International has organized a volunteer commitment, calling on governments, NGOs, businesses and other organizations to improve social responsibility in the seafood sector. For a list of organizations that have already committed to this call to action, visit: https://oceanconference.un.org/commitments.

The paper identifies three key principles that together establish a global standard for social responsibility in the seafood sector:  protecting human rights, dignity and respecting access to resources; ensuring equality and equitable opportunities to benefit; and improving food and livelihood security.

Seafood is the world’s most internationally traded food commodity. By 2030, the oceans will need to supply more than 150 million metric tons of seafood to meet the demands of a growing population. The paper calls on governments, businesses and the scientific community to take measurable steps to ensure seafood is sourced without harm to the environment and people that work in the seafood industry.

CI’s Human Nature blog provides a first-hand account of enslaved Thai fishermen and the people working at the forefront of this issue.

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​Arlington, Va. (May 24, 2017) – The following is a statement by Peter Seligmann, Conservation International's co-founder, chairman and CEO, on the President's FY2018 Budget Request, which would dramatically reduce funding for cost-effective…
Arlington, Va. (May 24, 2017) – The following is a statement by Peter Seligmann, Conservation International’s co-founder, chairman and CEO, on the President’s FY2018 Budget Request, which would dramatically reduce funding for cost-effective U.S. foreign assistance.

“There is a direct connection between the protection of nature’s assets and America’s economic and national security interests. In flashpoints around the world, the depletion of natural resources such as food and fresh water contributes to instability, conflict, migration, radicalization, and in the worst case, failed states.

“The risks to America’s national and economic security from resource scarcity and wildlife crime are increasingly clear. Strategic investments in international conservation promote effective foreign policy that can mitigate the drivers of violent extremism and transnational organized crime. As nature’s ability to provide essential services becomes further tested, continued U.S. leadership on international conservation funding is essential. 

“Congress has consistently expressed strong bipartisan support for international conservation. Conservation International welcomes the opportunity to work with Congress and the Administration on next steps in the FY2018 appropriations process to sustain strategic international conservation investments that promote U.S. jobs and prosperity, and help to ensure the safety and security of the American people.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.