​Global Effort to Make Your Morning Coffee Sustainable​​​​​​April 17, 2017 -- The Sustainable Coffee Challenge, a coalition of over 65 partners including corporations, governments, NGOs and research organizations, today announced…

Global Effort to Make Your Morning Coffee Sustainable​​​​​​

April 17, 2017 — The Sustainable Coffee Challenge, a coalition of over 65 partners including corporations, governments, NGOs and research organizations, today announced the first four Collective Action Networks to further its effort to make coffee the first sustainable agricultural product in the world.

The future of coffee depends on the ability of the sector to find effective solutions that address the greatest challenges facing coffee.  Sustaining coffee in light of climate variability, aging farmers, aging trees and volatile markets will require new collaborations that effectively replicate and scale up successful programs efficiently.

“A key tenet of the Sustainable Coffee Challenge is to encourage partners to tackle some of the most pressing challenges facing the coffee sector by working collaboratively. We invite all stakeholders to join in these efforts,” said Conservation International’s Bambi Semroc, who leads the Sustainable Coffee Challenge. “By joining together we will be able to transform the coffee sector and ensure its future while also creating a roadmap for other agricultural products to follow.”

The Global Specialty Coffee EXPO taking place this week in Seattle, WA, will kick-start a 100-day process to establish targets and milestones for each of the following Collective Action Networks:

Coffee Farm Renovation and Rehabilitation

Coffee farmers rely on productive and resilient trees to remain in the market and sustain their livelihoods. Yet disease, age, and climate change threaten the ability of current trees to keep up with growing demand. According to a 2015 IDH study, there is a need to replant an estimated 2.2 million hectares globally. Assuming 3,500 trees per hectare, this translates into roughly 7 billion coffee trees to meet future demand. This initiative establishes a 1 billion coffee tree target and will identify best practices for farm renovation and rehabilitation that ensures positive outcomes for both productivity and the environment.

“The objective is to coordinate efforts, share experiences and resources to accelerate renovation of coffee farms and to leverage these commitments to unlock additional resources for rehabilitation of coffee and reforestation on coffee farms.” said Semroc.

Members of this initiative include Arizona State University, Conservation International, Counter Culture Coffee, ECOM, Fairtrade International, Mexico’s Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (SAGARPA), Root Capital, Starbucks, TechnoServe, U.S. Agency for International Development, UTZ and World Coffee Research.

Improved Labor Practices and Labor Supply

Climate change, rural to urban migration, and market volatility are disrupting labor supply and practices across the industry. The coffee sector is increasingly recognizing the need to ensure a continued supply of labor and good labor conditions for these workers and new initiatives are emerging to address these issues. Labor conditions in the agricultural sector, however, are bigger than any one company, government agency or even sector. The group will review these efforts and develop new, scalable approaches to improving labor conditions in high priority areas. 

Members of this initiative include Conservation International, Catholic Relief Services, Counter Culture Coffee, Fairtrade International, Keurig Green Mountain, Inc., the Specialty Coffee Association and UTZ.

Scaling Up Sustainable Coffee Sourcing

Many retailers and roasters are making commitments to sustainably source their coffee – and many others are considering how they could make and achieve such a commitment.  This effort asks participants to work together to achieve sustainable sourcing commitments and inspire others to set sourcing targets. Through this initiative, companies who are advanced in these efforts will share their experiences, metrics, and best practices to help other retailers and roasters along their path to sustainability. 

“There is tremendous opportunity to share experiences and lessons learned to avoid reinventing the wheel and develop sustainable markets even further,” said Semroc.

Conservation International, Fairtrade International, Fair Trade USA, Farmer Brothers, Keurig Green Mountain, Inc., McDonald’s, S&D Coffee & Tea, Solidaridad, The Sustainability Consortium, and UTZ have all initially signed onto this initiative.

Mapping + Monitoring of Coffee and Forests

As rising temperatures, drought and changing weather patterns push coffee crops into new areas, this initiative will enable the industry to better monitor how coffee is impacting forest cover. Participants will work to identify innovative ways of mapping and monitoring the extent of coffee and forests in priority geographies most likely to experience significant shifts in suitable areas due to climate change. This work will enable the industry to understand the role of coffee in deforestation and forest conservation and where additional incentives for conservation are needed.  In addition, members of this initiative will explore opportunities for scaling up innovations that combine productivity with conservation.

Members of the Mapping + Monitoring of Coffee and Forests include Arizona State University, Conservation International, Fairtrade International, The Sustainability Consortium, and UTZ.

Industry members interested in joining the Sustainable Coffee Challenge are encouraged to contact scc@conservation.org. ​

About the Sustainable Coffee Challenge

The Sustainable Coffee Challenge convenes, unites and urges the coffee sector and conservation partners across the industry to spur the actions and investments necessary to make coffee the first sustainable agriculture product in the world. The Challenge is committed to stimulating demand for sustainable coffee across the value chain, from the policymaking level to the final consumer. By encouraging demand for sustainable coffee, it leads to investments that enable the transition to a sustainable production and ensuring the coffee we drink is a sustainable product.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.​

​​​​​Arlington, Va. (April 12, 2017) – New research​ published today in Conservation Letters finds that over half of fish stocks are below levels that would yield greater long-term catches, enhance…

​​​​​Arlington, Va. (April 12, 2017) – New research​ published today in Conservation Letters finds that over half of fish stocks are below levels that would yield greater long-term catches, enhance food security and avoid overfishing. Of those fish stocks, over a third are at 80 percent below sustainable catch.

The new findings are the result of an “ensemble modeling” approach that provides more detailed analysis of fish stocks than previously available.

The study and new methodology, which analyzed 785 fish stocks globally, received funding from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, Conservation International (CI) and The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Approximately three billion people depend on seafood as their main source of protein, and overfishing is a critical issue for food and livelihood security worldwide. Yet previous methods for evaluating fish stocks were only applied to smaller subset stocks or were based on expert input and not consistently calculated, providing an incomplete picture of their status for managers.

“Previous attempts to estimate fish stock status would broadly tell us if a fish stock was fully or overexploited,” said one of the lead authors, Dr. Elizabeth Selig, in an interview posted today on Human Nature, CI’s blog. “Our work shows just how far a given stock is from achieving its ideal or sustainable yield, which can help fisheries managers determine how best to manage their stock to increase yields. In the past, stocks received a pass or fail, which sometimes results in missing the opportunity to deliver greater economic and nutritional benefits to people.”

The authors note their findings hold significant promise for communities who are particularly dependent on seafood, but who have stocks that are not part of large-scale monitoring efforts.

“All of the attention can’t be focused on the major fisheries for the export market — there must also be an emphasis on getting the best results from local fisheries that feed local people,” said Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Center for Science and Democracy and lead author of the paper.

“Demand for seafood from a protein-hungry and growing middle class will need to be met by far more sustainable supply within this generation, and we believe understanding data-limited fisheries will be critical for establishing more sustainable supply chains,” explained Sabine Miltner, program director for Moore’s conservation and markets initiatives. “We’re grateful for this important progress on alternative, and perhaps more efficient, means to gaining that understanding.”

To learn more about CI’s work with fisheries, visit the
Human Nature blog.

About the Betty and Gordon Moore Foundation

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation fosters path-breaking scientific discovery, environmental conservation, patient care improvements and preservation of the special character of the Bay Area. Visit Moore.org or follow
@MooreFound.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all.
Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on
Facebook,
Twitter,
Instagram and
YouTube.

​​​(Arlington, VA) April 10, 2017 – A seven-year study concluded that the carbon footprint of a steak and shrimp dinner — were it to come from shrimp farms and pasture…

​​​(Arlington, VA) April 10, 2017 – A seven-year study concluded that the carbon footprint of a steak and shrimp dinner — were it to come from shrimp farms and pasture formerly occupied by mangroves — is the same as driving a small car across the continental United States. ​The groundbreaking research is the first time the impact of mangrove deforestation has been put in measurable consumer terms.

The study, led by Oregon State University and the Center for International Forestry Research, was based on the work of Conservation International’s Blue Carbon Initiative, which works to protect and restore coastal ecosystems for their role in reducing impacts of global climate change. The init​​iative’s work has served as a resource for governments looking to better their marine policy and preservation programs. The study’s findings fills a significant data gap for policymakers. The findings are published online today in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.

Mangroves help to fight climate ch​​ange, yet remain one of the world’s most threatened tropical ecosystems. Mangrove forests can store up to 10 times as much carbon as a similarly sized area of rainforest. When converted for other uses such as shrimp farms or cattle pastures, that carbon is slowly released back into the atmosphere. What was not fully understood — until this study — was the full carbon footprint of food production in mangrove areas.

“On a personal scale, this means a typical steak and shrimp cocktail dinner produced through mangrove conversion would burden the atmosphere with 1795 pounds of carbon dioxide,” said J. Boone Kauffman, an ecologist at Oregon State University who led the study. “This is approxim​​ately the same amount of greenhouse gases produced by driving a fuel-efficient automobile from Los Angeles to New York City.”

Th​​​e study was conducted on 30 relatively undisturbed mangrove forests and 21 adjacent shrimp ponds or cattle pastures across five countries. The findings led to a startling comparison.

If two people were to order a “surf and tur​f” special of 100 grams (4 ounces) of shrimp and a 450-gram (16-ounce) steak and the shrimp and beef were grown in an area of converted mangrove forest, the carbon footprint of the two meals combined would be the same as burning 695 liters (182 gallons) of gasoline.

“This study is critical for starting a conversation about the real impact of some of the ways we’re losing these vital ecosystems,” said Emily Pidgeon, Conservation International’s Senior Director of Strategic Marine Initiatives. “For countries to account for this properly in their na​tional greenhouse gas accounting, you need those numbers. They have huge policy significance.”

“Conservation International played an integral role in this publication through leadership in the Blue Carbon Initiative,” said Kauffman. “The inspiration and ideas derived from discussions with the world’s foremost scientists in coastal ecosystems that comprise the Initiative led to the r​esearch and publication of these relevant results.”

Ab​out Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About the OSU College of Agricultural Sciences: The college contributes in many ways to the economic and environmental sustainability of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. The college’s faculty are leaders in agriculture and food systems, natural resources management, rural economic development research, environmental toxicology and human health research.
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​​CI's Earth Day List: Four Actions to Support the Planet This AprilArlington, Va. (April 7​, 2017) - Today Conservation International (CI) announced four actions individuals can take to support science…

​​CI’s Earth Day List: Four Actions to Support the Planet This April

Arlington, Va. (April 7​, 2017) – Today Conservation International (CI) announced four actions individuals can take to support science and innovation this Earth Day, including a matching gift challenge that will protect 10,000 acres of rainforest.  The actions are all a part of the CI #ScienceMatters campaign spotlighting the role of applied science in helping build a healthier, more prosperous and productive world.

“Science is the only system we have to objectively use data to improve decisions critical to our planet and our way of life.  In a rapidly changing world, it’s now more important than ever,” said Dr. M. Sanjayan, Conservation International’s executive vice president and senior scientist. “This April, all actions, no matter how small, will collectively deliver a powerful message that science matters to all of us.”​​​

CI’s Earth Day List – Four Actions to support Science and Earth this April:

1.     Donate $25 to Help “Protect an Acre” of Rainforest

 The Amazon region is vital to human well-being across the globe. It provides 20 percent of the world’s breathable oxygen, 20 percent of the world’s fresh water and more species of plants and animals than anywhere else on the planet.

For every acre of rainforest protected through a $25 donation to the CI Protect an Acre campaign, SC Johnson will provide an acre-for-acre match up to 5,000 acres for a total of 10,000 acres.

To experience the extraordinary landscape of Amazonia, watch and share CI’s virtual reality (VR) film, “Under the Canopy.”

2.     Submit a Question to the CI “Ask A Scientist” Facebook Live Event

CI scientists are working at the forefront of protecting nature. Join CI for a Facebook Live event with three of its leading scientists and experts on April 20 at 12:00 p.m. Our distinguished panel will answer questions about climate, forests, fresh water, wildlife, oceans and encourage public dialogue about why nature needs science. Questions for our experts are welcome ahead of the chat, beginning April 10.  

3.     Celebrate Science: Tweet and Share the Facts Today if you Believe #ScienceMatters”

This Earth Day, take action with Conservation International by showing the world that #ScienceMatters to you. Join the movement in support of science and innovation by visiting our digital activation hub.

4.     Be Optimistic – At the Earth Optimism Summit

Join Conservation International via livestream at the Earth Optimism Summit, a three-day event taking place April 21 – 23 in Washington, DC, which will highlight what is working in conservation.  Listen to CI’s Sebastian Troeng, Senior Vice President, Americas Field Division, to discover how small groups are taking big steps Working with Local Communities. Then, discover how Incomes from Nature are helping protect biodiversity around the globe with CI’s Laure Katz, Director, Seascapes Program. Experience a virtual reality viewing of CI’s “Under the Canopy” film with screenings available throughout the summit.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

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​Arlington, Va. (April 5, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) Senior Vice President and Managing Director of The Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science Daniela Raik, Ph.D., made the following…

​Arlington, Va. (April 5, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) Senior Vice President and Managing Director of The Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science Daniela Raik, Ph.D., made the following statement today on the sapphire mining crisis in Madagascar:

 “Conservation International has worked in Madagascar for over 20 years, helping communities there protect nearly 400,000 acres of rainforest for the benefit of the people of Madagascar. The forest is home to approximately 325,000 people and provides services such as clean water, dependable food sources and sustainably harvested materials that millions of people depend on for their well-being.  The illegal sapphire mining threatens these essential services by bringing deforestation and destruction and no meaningful benefit to the community. Much like other illegal activity elsewhere in the world, like the poaching of wildlife, this mining activity does not benefit the people Madagascar. They are only left with the destruction and depletion of their natural resources. Conservation International is committed to our work in this area and we are asking our partners in the government to step up their efforts to put an end to this illegal activity.” 

 About Conservation International

​​Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.​

Abstract: Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of funds ​Arlington, Va. (March 22, 2017)…
Abstract: Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of funds

​Arlington, Va. (March 22, 2017) — Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of funds and personnel are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff.

MPAs, which include marine reserves, sanctuaries, parks and no-take zones, are areas designated to protect marine species and habitats from both global and local threats.

The research paper, “Capacity shortfalls hinder the performance of marine protected areas globally” was published in Nature today. ​

After four years assessing data on site management and fish populations in 589 MPAs worldwide, Dr. David Gill of Conservation International (CI) and his co-authors discovered that shortfalls in staffing and funding are hindering the recovery of MPA fish populations.

While fish populations grew in 71 percent of MPAs studied, the level of recovery of fish was strongly linked to the management of the sites. At MPAs with sufficient staffing, increases in fish populations were nearly three times greater than those without adequate personnel. Despite the critical role of local management capacity, only 35 percent of MPAs reported acceptable funding levels.

“Our study identified critical gaps in the effectiveness and equity of marine protected areas,” said Gill, who conducted the research during a postdoctoral fellowship supported by the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) and the Luc Hoffmann Institute. “We set out to understand how well marine protected areas are performing and why some perform better than others. What we found was that while most marine protected areas increased fish populations, including MPAs that allow some fishing activity, these increases were far greater in MPAs with adequate staff and budget.”

Marine protected areas are rapidly expanding in number and total area around the world. In 2011, 193 countries committed themselves to the Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Targets, including a goal of “effectively and equitably” managing 10 percent of their coastal and marine areas within MPAs and “other effective area-based conservation measures” by 2020. In the last two years alone, over 2.6 million km2 have been added to the portion of the global ocean covered by MPAs, bringing the total to over 14.9 million km2.

As countries continue to expand their coverage and create new MPAs to achieve national targets, many unanswered questions remain: Are MPAs meeting their social and ecological objectives? Are they being managed “effectively and equitably”? How can we ensure that MPAs deliver the ecological and social benefits they were designed to produce?

Led by Gill, a multinational and multidisciplinary research team worked to answer these key questions. The study used rigorous statistical methods to identify changes in fish populations attributable to the MPA and not due to other pre-existing factors, such as preferentially locating MPAs where threats are low. 

“These results highlight the potential for an infusion of resources and staff at established MPAs – and at MPAs in the pipeline – to enhance MPA management and ensure that MPAs realize their full potential,” said Dr. Helen Fox of the National Geographic Society, who led the research initiative together with Dr. Michael B. Mascia of CI.  “The good news is that this is a solvable problem. MPAs perform better when they have enough staff and an adequate budget.”

 “The risk is that MPAs proliferate without further investment in MPA management, leaving new sites without the resources they need to deliver on their promises. If resources are reallocated to new MPAs from currently protected areas, that could weaken these older sites, too,” added Mascia.

The authors propose policy solutions including increasing investments in MPA management, prioritizing social science research on MPAs and strengthening methods for monitoring and evaluation of MPAs.

David Gill is currently a David H. Smith Research Fellow at CI and George Mason University. Helen Fox and Mike Mascia began the work from the Conservation Science Program of WWF; they are now at National Geographic Society and CI, respectively.

About the study

This research was supported by the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) under funding received from the National Science Foundation DBI-1052875, as part of the working group: Solving the Mystery of Marine Protected Area (MPA) Performance: Linking Governance, Conservation, Ecosystem Services and Human Well Being. David Gill was jointly supported by postdoctoral fellowships from the Luc Hoffmann Institute and SESYNC.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. CI’s first VR film ‘Valen’s Reef’ tells the story of one of the most successful community-driven conservation projects in the world in the world, the Bird’s Head Seascape Initiative. “Valen’s Reef has been viewed by more than 1.7M people since its release in the end of June 2016.   Learn more about CI and the “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About SESYNC

SESYNC’s mission is to support synthetic, actionable team science on the structure, functioning and sustainability of socio-environmental systems. The center’s five core objectives are to: enhance the effectiveness of interdisciplinary collaborations among natural and social science research teams focused on environmental problems; build capacity and new communities of socio-environmental researchers; provide education programs to enhance interdisciplinarity and understanding of socio-environmental synthesis; enhance computational capacity to promote socio-environmental synthesis; and enhance relevance of socio-environmental research to decisions and behaviors via actionable scholarship. For more information on SESYNC and its activities, please visit www.sesync.org.​

Arlington, Va. (March 17, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) Co-founder, Chairman and CEO Peter Seligmann responded today with the following statement regarding President Donald Trump’s proposed funding cuts as a…

Arlington, Va. (March 17, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) Co-founder, Chairman and CEO Peter Seligmann responded today with the following statement regarding President Donald Trump’s proposed funding cuts as a part of his FY2018 budget:

“The risks to America’s national and economic security from resource scarcity are increasingly clear, as diminishing resources such as food and fresh water lead to instability, conflict, mass migration and radicalization. International conservation is a vital component to ensure our national security.

“There is a direct connection between resource scarcity, international conservation and America’s national and economic security. We hope that, as the Trump Administration develops its final FY2018 budget request, and as Congress considers this request, that they recognize this connection and protect America’s security by supporting international conservation.”

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work ​on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​​Arlington, Va. (March 7, 2017) — Anastasia Khoo has been named Chief Marketing Officer of Conservation International (CI). Khoo joins CI from the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), where she led…
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Arlington, Va. (March 7, 2017) — Anastasia Khoo has been named Chief Marketing Officer of Conservation International (CI). Khoo joins CI from the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), where she led historic communications and marketing campaigns for the organization as Chief Marketing Officer. Her appointment was announced by Peter Seligmann, Chairman and CEO of CI. Khoo will join CI on April 3.

Khoo is an award-winning marketer whose experience at HRC spans several landmark Supreme Court decisions, four election cycles and numerous campaigns that have helped change the course of history. “Anastasia is a gifted and strategic marketer who has set new standards for modern-day campaigns,” said Conservation International’s Chairman and CEO Peter Seligmann, who noted that her appointment followed an extensive national search. “We are thrilled to have her join our leadership team and bring her intellectual passion and storytelling abilities to some of the most important issues facing the planet.”

Dr. M. Sanjayan, Conservation International’s Executive Vice President and Senior Scientist added: “I have long admired Anastasia’s ability to engage audiences in ways that result in lasting change. Her timing in joining CI couldn’t be better. More than ever before, our message – that people need nature – is urgent and relevant, especially to the younger generations who are so crucial to our mission.”

During Khoo’s 11-year tenure with HRC, she powerfully used data and technology to deliver a series of ground-breaking marketing and communications campaigns around critical moments in America’s history such as the recent Obergefell v. Hodges marriage equality decision, the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” and the introduction of the Equality Act. She was the architect of HRC’s 2013 record-breaking “red equal sign” campaign that became Facebook’s most viral campaign in the platform’s history and most recently, the #LoveWins effort that garnered over 7 million retweets worldwide.

Her work has earned top honors including Mashable’s “Best Social Media Campaign”, PR Week’s “Best Digital Campaign”, Shorty Award for Social Good & “Best Facebook Campaign”, APA Pollie Gold, PR News’ “Best Social Good Campaign”, and SXSW’s prestigious “Best Digital Campaign”, “Best Social Media Campaign” and the highly-coveted “Best in Show” awards. Khoo has also received a wide variety of accolades including “Digital Innovator of the Year”, “Gamechanger” and PR News “Top Women in PR.” Most recently, Khoo joined an elite group of PR professionals to earn the “Champion of PR” award distinction from PR Week.

Khoo is also a widely sought-after commentator by top media outlets, including The Today Show, The New Yorker, Washington Post, Stanford Social Innovation Review and Marketing Power. Her appearances also include conferences such as The Guardian’s Activate London Summit, Mashable Social Good and SXSW.

Prior to HRC, Khoo spent six years with Greenpeace, developing its brand and communications strategy. Khoo holds a bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College. She will be based at CI’s headquarters in Arlington, Va.

About Conservation International (CI)
Building upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, CI empowers societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature, our global biodiversity for the well-being of people. Founded in 1987, CI is headquartered in the Washington, D.C. area and employs more than 800 staff in 30 countries on six continents, and has nearly 1,000 partners around the world. For more information, please visit our website at: www.conservation.org/ or visit us on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter​.

Arlington, Va. (March 1, 2017) – Research published today in the journal Climatic Change details the severe consequences of climate change across Central America, including its impact on agriculture and…

Arlington, Va. (March 1, 2017) – Research published today in the journal Climatic Change details the severe consequences of climate change across Central America, including its impact on agriculture and ecosystems. The research is the first to both frame the current challenges facing the region and to identify policy strategies that could help the region adapt.

The research papers, by scientists from Conservation International (CI) and partners from over 20 institutions including academia and research centers, are available online at https://link.springer.com/journal/10584/141/1/page/1.

Key research findings include:

“These results show that climate change will have major impacts on crop productivity and smallholders in Central America,” said Lee Hannah, a senior scientist at Moore Center for Science and co-author and co-editor of the special issue. “This research improves our ability to help the most vulnerable small farmers and those in poverty.”

The effects of climate change are already evident in Central America, with changes in rainfall, temperature and water availability affecting the region’s large population of smallholder farmers. Their crops reliant on rainfall, these farmers are especially vulnerable to changes in climatic conditions and often have limited financial resources and capacity to cope with climate stresses and shocks.

The research addresses the region’s consistent lack of access to information needed to guide policymaking. This lack of information has impeded policy makers, practitioners and leaders from implementing policy strategies that could help smallholder farmers and the overall region to adapt.

As part of CI’s CASCADE Project, the research is a joint venture with the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE) and CIRAD, a research center working with developing countries to tackle international agricultural and development issues. CI’s CASCADE Project is funded by the International Climate Initiative of the German Government. The CASCADE “Ecosystem-based Adaptation for Smallholder Subsistence and Coffee Farming Communities in Central America” project is identifying and testing ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) strategies to help smallholder farming communities adapt to these climate changes in Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube​.

Blue-Abadi-Fund-raises-23-million

Bali, Indonesia: February 24, 2017 – At the World Ocean Summit today, Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife Fund and the Indonesian government announced US$23 million in support for…

Bali, Indonesia: February 24, 2017 – At the World Ocean Summit today, Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife Fund and the Indonesian government announced US$23 million in support for the Blue Abadi Fund, which is on track to be the world’s largest marine conservation trust. The Fund is uniquely designed to support local community stewardship of the protected areas of the world’s most biodiverse reefs, Indonesia’s Bird’s Head Seascape.

The announcement comes just 5 months after the Fund initiative was announced. Once the Fund is fully capitalized, the Seascape will contain Indonesia’s first sustainably financed marine protected area network (MPAs).

Located in West Papua, the Bird’s Head Seascape encompasses more than 2,500 islands and reefs and supports thousands of species — including 70 that can be found nowhere else on Earth.

The Blue Abadi Fund will help secure the long-term financial sustainability of the Bird’s Head Seascape by providing grants to local communities and agencies so they can sustainably manage their marine resources into the future.

The Fund is a powerful example of how local leadership combined with coordinated global support can deliver sustained conservation goals. Founding supporters include: the Walton Family Foundation, USAID, MacArthur Foundation, Global Environment Facility and others.

“These protected areas exist thanks to the support and involvement of local communities and fishermen,” said Rob Walton of the Walton Family Foundation, which has been working in the Bird’s Head region for more than a decade. “Of course it is not enough to create marine protected areas, you have to have long-term management and enforcement. That is what the Blue Abadi fund is all about.”

The Bird’s Head Seascape coalition was launched in 2004 by Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy and World Wildlife Fund and now includes 30 conservation partners, including local and national governments, international and local NGOs, and academic institutions. Its mission is to ensure sustainable management of the Bird’s Head Seascape’s resources in a way that empowers local indigenous communities while enhancing their food security and livelihoods.

“The future of our planet depends upon the wisdom of communities,” said Peter Seligmann, chairman and CEO of Conservation International. “Through the Blue Abadi Fund the global community joins with local communities to secure the long-term health of the Bird’s Head seascape, arguably the most diverse marine region of Planet Earth.”

Since the launch of the Coalition 12 years ago, the MPA Network in the Bird’s Head Seascape has grown to include 3.6 million hectares of MPAs or approximately 20 percent of all MPAs in Indonesia. Locally managed by communities and government, the MPA Network prioritizes biodiversity conservation and sustainable local fisheries. Working together, they have reduced overfishing by outside poachers by 90 percent while enjoying growth in sustainable fisheries, food security and tourism.

Overall, the Coalition effort has engaged 30 partner organizations — including Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy, the World Wildlife Fund — and 70 donors, both local and global. The governments of Indonesia and the West Papua Province, along with local communities, have played fundamental roles in managing the MPA network and local fisheries.

The Bird’s Head Seascape Coalition will complete a full transfer of MPA management responsibilities to local communities and the government by June 2017, who will then co-manage them into the future. Local funding sources will provide 70 percent of the financing needed for the seascape, with the Indonesian government being the largest source of funding, and the Blue Abadi Fund providing the remaining 30 percent.

In a demonstration of their commitment to the MPA network and as a match to the Blue Abadi Fund, the West Papuan government has committed to provide a minimum of Rp. 7.215.000.000 (US$555,000) per year to the management of the MPA network starting in 2018. Budget allocations from the National government as well as revenues generated from tourism user fees will also contribute to the MPA costs.

“As a conservation province, our natural resources are of strategic value and importance for West Papua. To ensure that we continue to benefit from conservation, we need to work together to ensure that our MPAs are sufficiently and sustainably funded,” said Drs. Nathaniel D. Mandacan, M.Si, the Secretary General of the West Papua Provincial Government.

Local communities and agencies will use the funds to implement comprehensive management plans for the 12 MPAs that support activities such as effective patrol systems, community outreach and development, and ecological and social monitoring so management activities can be adapted over time. Funds will also be available to Papuan civil society for innovative community conservation and fishing projects, and more.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses an innovative blend of science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water, and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and follow our work on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

About WWF

WWF is one of the world’s leading conservation organizations, working in 100 countries for over half a century. With the support of almost 5 million members worldwide, WWF is dedicated to delivering science-based solutions to preserve the diversity and abundance of life on Earth, halt the degradation of the environment, and combat climate change. Visit www.worldwildlife.org to learn more and follow our news conversations on Twitter @World_Wildlife.

About The Nature Conservancy

The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world’s toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at unprecedented scale, and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in more than 65 countries, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. In Indonesia, TNC has been working to transform practices and informs policies for more than 25 years. To learn more, visit www.nature.or.id or follow @ID_Nature​ on Twitter.