​Arlington, Va. (August 9, 2018) – "Dulce," a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, has been selected to screen at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival running September 6…
​Arlington, Va. (August 9, 2018) – “Dulce,” a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, has been selected to screen at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival running September 6 – 16, 2018 in Toronto, Ontario. Tickets are available here.  

Filmed in La Ensenada on the Pacific coast of Colombia, the film follows a young girl, Dulce, whose small fishing community is struggling with the effects of climate change on their lives. In Dulce’s community, climate change means higher tides from rising sea levels in the Pacific Ocean.

“Dulce” was co-directed by Guille Isa and Angello Faccini and produced by filmmakers Jungles in Paris. It was executive produced by actor and activist Lee Pace, and Margarita Mora and Anastasia Khoo on behalf of Conservation International.

As the film opens, Dulce is being taught to swim by her mother, Betty. For this community, swimming is survival: It is a skill Dulce needs to carry on her family’s livelihood harvesting piangua, a cockle, from nearby mangroves. Meanwhile, rising tides have wiped out entire villages in recent years near La Ensenada, heightening Betty’s urgency to help Dulce master this skill.

For generations, Afro-Colombian residents of the Iscuandé River delta, which includes La Ensenada, have fished and harvested piangua. But the cockle have been in decline due to overharvesting – a development that has spurred communities like Dulce’s to learn to conserve coastal areas from pollution and ocean erosion.

“The decision to tell this story through the eyes of a mother and daughter was deliberate. Across the globe, women are on the front lines of climate change. The urgency we feel as Betty struggles to teach her daughter to swim reminds us that that women are more likely than men to feel the impacts of climate change, especially in the developing world,” said Anastasia Khoo, Conservation International’s Chief Marketing Officer. “Increasingly, they are also the ones rising to the challenge to speak up and force change.”

This film arrives at a promising moment in Colombia’s environmental history. Last year, President Juan Manuel Santos expanded the coastal ecosystems protected under the Malpelo Fauna and Flora Sanctuary along the Pacific Ocean. The national park expanded by 1.7 million hectares, from 950,000 hectares to 2.7 million hectares.

Conservation International and Fondo Acción have joined in the creation of a conservation trust fund, La Minga, to benefit the Colombia’s Pacific coast as well. It is home to over 30,000 people of primarily Afro-Colombian descent, as well as 1,400 species, including 80 percent of the region’s humpback whale breeding grounds, and some of the country’s most intact mangrove forests.

In the tradition of Conservation International’s other films (“Nature is Speaking,” “Valen’s Reef,” “Under the Canopy” and the recently released “My Africa”), “Dulce” puts a human face on the quest for environmental protection.  

For Conservation International, it is an effective strategy. Viewers of “Under the Canopy” responded by helping the organization, with the backing of SC Johnson, to protect 10,000 acres of rainforest in record time. 

Jungles in Paris, cofounded by Oliver and Darrell Hartman in 2013, also has been recognized for its environmental-themed films. The mission-driven media company focuses on subjects of nature and culture, having produced short documentaries featured at festivals such as Hot Docs, Atlanta and Big Sky.

Co-directors Isa and Faccini have also seen their work presented in numerous international film festivals. Isa’s films have appeared at Barcelona, Amsterdam, Riverrun, Sidewalk and more. Faccini has among his film credits Lina (2016), a winner of a Young Director’s Award at Cannes and Best Direction Award at the Malaga Film Festival.

Assets for media use:

Social media: https://www.facebook.com/DulceDoc/

Images: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Wj-qv4mnUkBmiEaisPWC2hLTH-3tkaA0     

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube

About Jungles in Paris
Jungles in Paris, founded in 2013 and based in New York City, tells stories about nature and culture. We use a range of media to explore planet Earth in all its multi-colored diversity, with a special focus on roots and place. Spotlighting craft, culture, geography and wildlife, we aim to celebrate subjects — human and non-human alike — that are often at risk of extinction in a globalized, growth-driven 21st century. We prioritize the local, the endemic, the time-honored, and the meaningful. Rather than pure advocacy, we practice purpose-driven media. We aim in our work to restore a sense of enchantment
around the things that matter, employing creative nonfiction methods to propose a more enlightened way of engaging with the ecosystems and cultural possibilities around us.

​Arlington, Va. (July 23, 2018) – Today, Conservation International announced that former President of the Republic of Botswana, Ian Khama, will join as a Distinguished Fellow. Khama, Botswana's fourth president,…
​Arlington, Va. (July 23, 2018) – Today, Conservation International announced that former President of the Republic of Botswana, Ian Khama, will join as a Distinguished Fellow. Khama, Botswana’s fourth president, previously served as a Conservation International board member for 19 years. 

In his role as a Distinguished Fellow, Khama will represent Conservation International across Africa and build on his decades-long legacy of forging a more sustainable development path for the region. Khama, a driving force behind the Gaborone Declaration for Sustainability in Africa (GDSA), will continue to work with member countries and engage new ones to align economic development and sustainability goals.

Khama will also work with the international community to combat the illegal wildlife trade through the Elephant Protection Initiative; a multi-national coalition where Conservation International serves as secretariat.  

Building on his success in helping to make Botswana a beacon of sustainable tourism, Khama will also continue to provide leadership in ensuring tourism supports the region’s environmental and cultural heritage.

“What President Khama brings to Conservation International is immeasurable. For decades, he has provided us with a unique perspective as an exceptional leader who shares our commitment to securing nature for the benefit of people. We’re thrilled to continue to benefit from his vision and institutional knowledge to preserve Africa’s rich natural resources,” said Conservation International Chairman Peter Seligmann.

“Over 30 years ago, Conservation International was founded on the principle that community-led conservation was the approach that best benefited people and ecosystems. President Khama embodies this approach and has successfully led environmental initiatives in Botswana and the broader African region to implement this idea. We are honored to have President Khama continue to lend us his leadership and expertise as a Distinguished Fellow,” said Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​Arlington, Va. (July 17, 2018) – Today Conservation International announced new leadership for its Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Americas Field Division. Dr. Mike Mascia, currently Senior…
​Arlington, Va. (July 17, 2018) – Today Conservation International announced new leadership for its Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Americas Field Division. Dr. Mike Mascia, currently Senior Director of Social Science at the Moore Center for Science, will become Senior Vice President.  The Moore Center’s current Senior Vice President, Dr. Daniela Raik, will be Senior Vice President for the organization’s Americas Field Division. 

“With Mike heading up our scientific research and Daniela managing our conservation programs, Conservation International is well positioned to effectively develop, deliver, and measure our efforts to  save nature for the benefit of people worldwide,” said Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan.

In his new role, Mascia will direct the Moore Center’s efforts to better understand humanity’s dependence upon and relationship with nature. Through research, technical assistance, and capacity-building, the Moore Center strives to address three questions: how much nature do people need, how can we best conserve nature, and what are the impacts of conservation on nature and the people who depend upon it?

Mascia joined Conservation International in 2014 as the Senior Director of Social Science at the Moore Center, where he concentrated his research on the ebb and flow of protected areas, why conservation interventions go viral, and the impacts of conservation. Previously, he led social science at the World Wildlife Fund and worked for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

He is published widely in scientific literature such as Nature, Science, Conservation Letters (where he served as founding co-editor in chief), Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Conservation Biology. He received his Ph.D. from Duke University in environmental politics and policy and holds a B.A. from Bowdoin College in biology and government. Mike is also currently serving as the President of the Board of the Society for Conservation Biology, the first social scientist to do so.

Raik steps into the role of Senior Vice President for the Americas Field Division, having served as the Senior Vice President and managing director of the Moore Center since 2016.  Conservation International has over 20 years of experience throughout Central and South America executing major conservation programs in fields ranging from green development to remote sensing and land-use planning, among others.

In March 2016, Daniela returned to Conservation International after leading the Climate Change, Natural Resources and Biodiversity department at International Resources Group. Previously, she worked at Conservation International for 10 years, serving in a number of roles, including as Vice President of Field Program Management, guiding the work of its field division in nearly 30 countries.

She has a Ph.D. and M.S. in Natural Resources from Cornell University, and a B.A. in Biology from New York University. 

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About the Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science
The Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science uses research and science to guide the development, delivery and evaluation of Conservation International’s efforts to protect nature and sustain life on Earth. In support of field programs in 30 countries worldwide, the Moore Center serves as a bridge between academia and the field through partnerships with MIT, Arizona State University, University of Hawaii, University of Adelaide, UC Santa Barbara, and King’s College of London in addition to work with government agencies such as NASA, the European Space Agency and Stockholm Environment Institute. The Center’s scientists are frequently published in leading scientific journals and many hold faculty positions at top universities throughout the U.S. 

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​Arlington, Va. (July 13, 2018) – "My Africa", the latest virtual reality project from Conservation International, has been shortlisted for VR Film of the Year for the VR Awards 2018,…
​Arlington, Va. (July 13, 2018) – “My Africa”, the latest virtual reality project from Conservation International, has been shortlisted for VR Film of the Year for the VR Awards 2018, taking place this October in London, England. Organized by VR Bound, the VR Awards 2018 celebrate achievement involving immersive technology. 

Narrated by Academy Award-winning and Kenyan-raised actress Lupita Nyong’o, “My Africa” transports viewers to an elephant sanctuary in Kenya, where a community is reknitting the bonds that have long enabled people and wildlife to coexist.

Directed by four-time Emmy winner David Allen, the project was captured with virtual reality cameras in the Namunyak Wildlife Conservancy in Samburu County of northern Kenya at the Reteti Elephant Sanctuary, the first elephant orphanage in Africa owned and operated by the local community. In a region where wealthy outsiders have traditionally pursued conservation, Reteti, and the surrounding conservancy organization, Northern Rangelands Trust, offer a different model — one grounded in local leadership and traditional knowledge.

Produced by Passion Planet in association with Vision3 and with the support of The Tiffany & Co. Foundation, “My Africa” received additional support for distribution from glassybaby.  

“My Africa” is viewable in the WITHIN app and in 360-degree video at conservation.org/MyAfrica. The film is available in seven languages: English, French, Mandarin, Portuguese, Samburu, Spanish and Swahili.  

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”,  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef”. Follow Conservation International’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

New collaboration established between ExxonMobil Foundation, Conservation International and University of GuyanaProgram to advance Guyana’s sustainable economy through investments in education, research, sustainable management and conservation of the country’s vast…
  • New collaboration established between ExxonMobil Foundation, Conservation International and University of Guyana
  • Program to advance Guyana’s sustainable economy through investments in education, research, sustainable management and conservation of the country’s vast ecosystems
  • Part of ExxonMobil’s long-term investment in supporting local priorities in Guyana
​IRVING, Texas & GEORGETOWN, Guyana–(BUSINESS WIRE)–ExxonMobil Foundation said today that it will contribute US$10 million to a new collaboration with Conservation International and the University of Guyana to train Guyanese for sustainable job opportunities and to expand community-supported conservation.

The investment is also intended to support Guyana’s Green State Development Plan, the country’s 15-year development plan that aims, among other things, to diversify Guyana’s economy and balance economic growth with the sustainable management and conservation of the country’s ecosystems. The ExxonMobil Foundation will provide the investment over five years.
Initial grant money will fund a feasibility study driven by Conservation International, through its affiliate, Conservation International Guyana, to further define the details of the program. Once defined, Conservation International Guyana and the University of Guyana will deliver the education, training, research and retention programs that will help ensure that economic growth reinforces Guyana’s environmental development goals.

The investment is also intended to expand conservation areas in the Rupununi Wetlands, aid mangrove restoration and management and support improvements to community-based fishing on Guyana’s coast, a sector the government of Guyana has identified as critically important to the wellbeing of the Guyanese people, and support the work of the University of Guyana’s Greening Research and Innovation Centres.

“This partnership will support the highest conservation priorities for the country as well as education and training for sustainable employment,” said Kevin Murphy, president of the ExxonMobil Foundation. “It reinforces the government’s objectives as outlined in its Green State Development Strategy and demonstrates the value we place on our long-term relationship with the citizens of Guyana.”

“Guyana stands at a critical crossroads in its development,” said Jennifer Morris, president of Conservation International. “By investing in both people and nature, this partnership will play an important part in helping Guyana execute its vision for a green future.”

“A central feature of Guyana’s development plans is its Green State Development Strategy which envisions a commitment to a green economy, sustainable development and protection of its forests and fresh water resources aligned with the UN’s 2030 Sustainable Development Goals,” said Professor Nigel E. Harris, chairman of the University of Guyana Council. “Funding support for a collaborative effort between Guyana’s leading university, Conservation International and ExxonMobil Foundation promises a critical opportunity to build relevant teaching, research and outreach capacity at our university that is necessary to underpin Guyana’s 2030 Vision for an inclusive, green and prosperous state.”

At this stage, Conservation International anticipates that training will be focused on environmental innovation and sustainability, and on entrepreneurship in nature-based sectors. Conservation International will tap its partnerships with key international universities such as Arizona State University in the United States to help develop the programs.

Conservation International is the grantee and the University of Guyana a key beneficiary. Conservation International, with over 20 years’ experience in Guyana, will take the lead in managing project objectives and implementation, including success measures as well as financial and reporting requirements of this multi-year partnership. Conservation International has been working in Guyana with over 50 communities to protect nearly 3 million acres of indigenous lands while also improving livelihoods.

ExxonMobil is placing an emphasis on supporting local priorities, including business and employment opportunities as well as broader community programs in Guyana. The company has spent about US$39 million with local suppliers in Guyana through 2017 and first quarter 2018. Approximately 68 percent of ExxonMobil’s current in-country employees are Guyanese.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”, “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef”. Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About the ExxonMobil Foundation
The ExxonMobil Foundation is the primary philanthropic arm of Exxon Mobil Corporation (NYSE:XOM) in the United States. The foundation and the corporation engage in a range of philanthropic activities that advance education, with a focus on math and science in the United States, promote women as catalysts for economic development and combat malaria. In 2017, the ExxonMobil Foundation, together with Exxon Mobil Corporation, its divisions and affiliates along with employees and retirees, provided $204 million in contributions worldwide.

About ExxonMobil
ExxonMobil, the largest publicly traded international energy company, uses technology and innovation to help meet the world’s growing energy needs. ExxonMobil is a global leader in LNG project execution and holds an industry-leading inventory of resources, is one of the largest refiners and marketers of petroleum products, and its chemical company is one of the largest in the world. For more information, visit www.exxonmobil.com or follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/exxonmobil. Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited is the affiliate in Guyana.

About University of Guyana
The University of Guyana (UG) was established by act of parliament in 1963. It is the country’s leading tertiary institution and Guyana’s only national university. With a current enrollment of some 8,000 students, UG has graduated more than 40,000 students who have gone on to successful careers locally, regionally and internationally. Over 65 percent of its graduates are absorbed in the local workforce. The university is also a major contributor to the national economy and to business and industry. UG expanded in 2000 with the addition of the Tain Campus. It now offers more than 90 undergraduate and post-graduate programs including engineering, environmental studies, forestry, urban planning and management, tourism studies, education, creative arts, economics, law, medicine, optometry and nursing. Several online programs are available and UG also offers extra-mural classes at four locations across Guyana through its Institute of Distance and Continuing Education. UG also offers the opportunity for student engagement in debating, sports, and cultural, religious and professional activities. Visit www.uog.edu.gy.

​Arlington, Va. (June 21, 2018) – "Dulce," a short documentary film by Conservation International, has been selected for the 2018 Palm Springs International ShortFest running June 19-25, 2018, at Camelot…
​Arlington, Va. (June 21, 2018) – “Dulce,” a short documentary film by Conservation International, has been selected for the 2018 Palm Springs International ShortFest running June 19-25, 2018, at Camelot Theatres in Palm Springs, Calif. The film will have its world premiere on June 21st at 5:00 pm local time in the PS Cultural Center. Tickets are available here.

Filmed in La Ensenada on the Pacific coast of Colombia, the film follows a young girl, Dulce, whose small fishing community is struggling to surmount the effects of climate change on their lives. In Dulce’s community, climate change means higher tides from rising sea levels in the Pacific Ocean.

“Dulce” was co-directed by Guille Isa and Angello Faccini and produced by filmmakers Jungles in Paris. It was executive produced by actor and activist Lee Pace, and Margarita Mora and Anastasia Khoo on behalf of Conservation International.

As the film opens, Dulce is being taught to swim by her mother, Betty. For this community, swimming is survival: It is a skill Dulce needs to carry on her family’s livelihood harvesting piangua, a cockle, from nearby mangroves. Meanwhile, rising tides have wiped out entire villages in recent years near La Ensenada, heightening Betty’s urgency to help Dulce master this skill.

For generations, Afro-Colombian residents of the Iscuandé River delta, which includes La Ensenada, have fished and harvested piangua. But the cockle have been in decline due to overharvesting – a development that has spurred communities like Dulce’s to learn to conserve coastal areas from pollution and ocean erosion.

“The decision to tell this story through the eyes of a mother and daughter was deliberate. Across the globe, women are on the front lines of climate change. The urgency we feel as Betty struggles to teach her daughter to swim reminds us that that women are more likely than men to feel the impacts of climate change, especially in the developing world,” said Anastasia Khoo, Conservation International’s Chief Marketing Officer. “Increasingly, they are also the ones rising to the challenge to speak up and force change.”

This film arrives at a promising moment in Colombia’s environmental history. Last year, President Juan Manuel Santos expanded the coastal ecosystems protected under the Malpelo Fauna and Flora Sanctuary along the Pacific Ocean. The national park expanded by 1.7 million hectares, from 950,000 hectares to 2.7 million hectares.

Conservation International and Fondo Acción have joined in the creation of a conservation trust fund, La Minga, to benefit the Colombia’s Pacific coast as well. It is home to over 30,000 people of primarily Afro-Colombian descent, as well as 1,400 species, including 80 percent of the region’s humpback whale breeding grounds, and some of the country’s most intact mangrove forests.

In the tradition of Conservation International’s other films (“Nature is Speaking,” “Valen’s Reef,” “Under the Canopy” and the recently released “My Africa”), “Dulce” puts a human face on the quest for environmental protection.  

For Conservation International, it is an effective strategy. Viewers of “Under the Canopy” responded by helping the organization, with the backing of SC Johnson, to protect 10,000 acres of rainforest in record time. 

Jungles in Paris, cofounded by Oliver and Darrell Hartman in 2013, also has been recognized for its environmental-themed films. The mission-driven media company focuses on subjects of nature and culture, having produced short documentaries featured at festivals such as Hot Docs, Atlanta and Big Sky.

Co-directors Isa and Faccini have also seen their work presented in numerous international film festivals. Isa’s films have appeared at Barcelona, Amsterdam, Riverrun, Sidewalk and more. Faccini has among his film credits Lina (2016), a winner of a Young Director’s Award at Cannes and Best Direction Award at the Malaga Film Festival.

Assets for media use*:

Websites:

18 seconds: https://www.conservation.org/Pages/video.aspx?ytVideoId=OkcykawT5GM&autoplay=true

28 seconds: https://www.conservation.org/Pages/video.aspx?ytVideoId=14dFHsLEMhA&autoplay=true

YouTube trailers:

28 Second Clip: https://youtu.be/14dFHsLEMhA

18 Second Clip: https://youtu.be/OkcykawT5GM

Images: http://ci.tandemvault.com/lightboxes/2P4W8uh1d?t=1Z0ATGT1Y

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About Jungles in Paris
Jungles in Paris, founded in 2013 and based in New York City, tells stories about nature and culture. We use a range of media to explore planet Earth in all its multi-colored diversity, with a special focus on roots and place. Spotlighting craft, culture, geography and wildlife, we aim to celebrate subjects — human and non-human alike — that are often at risk of extinction in a globalized, growth-driven 21st century. We prioritize the local, the endemic, the time-honored, and the meaningful. Rather than pure advocacy, we practice purpose-driven media. We aim in our work to restore a sense of enchantment around the things that matter, employing creative nonfiction methods to propose a more enlightened way of engaging with the ecosystems and cultural possibilities around us.

About Palm Springs International ShortFest 
Designated by AMPAS, BAFTA and BIFA as an award-qualifying festival, and accredited by the International Short Film Conference, the Palm Springs International ShortFest & Short Film Market, one of the most acclaimed short film showcases in the world, will take place in Palm Springs on June 19-25. Now in its 23rd year, ShortFest will showcase 338 short films from 60 countries. The concurrent Short Film Market, the only one in North America, will feature a library of more than 4,200 films available to film buyers, industry and press.  The ShortFest Forum programs are a four-day schedule of seminars, panel discussions, roundtables and master classes staged free of charge for attending filmmakers.   

Arlington, Va. (June 19, 2018) – A new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) found that sharks populations are disappearing in waters where…
Arlington, Va. (June 19, 2018) – A new study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) found that sharks populations are disappearing in waters where humans are fishing – even in marine protected areas.

The study, conducted by Conservation International Senior Director, Global Fisheries and Aquaculture Program Jack Kittinger, Ph.D. and 36 scientists, assessed about 1,800 tropical coral reefs and found that sharks and other reef predators, such as large snappers, were present in just 28 percent of the scientists’ observations. Also, they were hardly seen at all at reefs where human pressure, through fishing or pollution, was high.

The research provides vital evidence on the most effective ways to protect fish populations, especially sharks. The study showed that the number of top predators in large remote marine reserves in areas with very low human pressures is much higher – more than quadruple the numbers found in remote lightly fished unprotected areas.

“Coral reefs are in a trade war and the conservationists’ solution of choice is Marine Protected Areas,” said Kittinger. “This research tells us that the closer a reef is to a major market, the more we have to temper our expectations about conservation gains, and the more important remote protected areas become for populations of top predators.”

Researchers used a new way of measuring the human pressures, such as fishing and pollution, to study the effects these are having on fish on the world’s reefs. The ‘human gravity’ scale calculates factors such as human population size, distance to reefs, and the transport infrastructure on land – which can determine reefs’ accessibility to fishermen and markets.

Where human pressure was high, the probability of encountering a top predator dropped to almost zero (less than 0.005). This scarcity is regardless of whether there are protections in place, such as ‘no-take’ marine reserves or restrictions on fishing equipment.

Research failed to pinpoint why sharks do better in remote reserves, however, the market value of fins expose sharks to fishing. In addition, scientists believe the size of reserves in heavily fished areas are likely to be too small to protect sharks as they have large hunting ranges that likely expose them to fishing when they stray outside reserves.

The study also reveals that people are profoundly degrading communities of fish on coral reefs. Marine reserves located in remote areas with little human pressure have more than four times as many fish compared to reserves near highly fished areas.

Although those reserves within areas of high human pressure are relatively depleted, the research shows that they play a vital conservation role, containing around five times as many fish as openly fished areas under similar human pressure. 

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”,  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef”. Follow Conservation International’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

​New Tool Will Be Used to Develop Future Sustainability InitiativesKo Olina, Hawaii (June 8, 2018) – Today, at the 2nd Annual World Oceans Day Celebration in Ko Olina, Hawaii, Conservation International…
​New Tool Will Be Used to Develop Future Sustainability Initiatives

Ko Olina, Hawaii (June 8, 2018) – Today, at the 2nd Annual World Oceans Day Celebration in Ko Olina, Hawaii, Conservation International and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the Ocean Health Index score for Hawaii.  The Index scored the Main Hawaiian Islands at 74 out of possible 100, citing loss and degradation of beaches, coral reefs, and coastal wetlands.  

Called the “Fitbit for oceans,” the Ocean Health Index was created by Conservation International and is used to assess ocean health on the local and regional scale. This is the first time a score has been indexed for Hawaii.  The full report can be found here.

The Ocean Health Index, says Eva Schemmel, science adviser for Conservation International Hawaii, is not simply to keep score of ocean health, but rather to inform policy for better management of Hawaii’s natural resources.

“The Ocean Health Index allows us to assess the benefits that current policies and management actions are having to protect our oceans and coastal environments, highlighting effective interventions. The Hawaii Ocean Health Index will be repeated into the future to track sustainability initatives and local management actions to ensure a healthy future for future generations,” said Eva Schemmel, science adviser for Conservation International Hawaii. 

“Maintaining a healthy ocean is absolutely critical for sustaining the needs and livelihoods of our island communities. An integrated assessment of our ocean ecosystems, such as the Ocean Health Index, is key to tracking changes in ocean health and devising management strategies that promote sustainable use of the environment,” said Dr. Jamison Gove National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center.

The Hawaii Ocean Health Index is part of the Aloha+ Challenge, Hawaii’s statewide commitment to achieve six integrated sustainability goals by 2030 for clean energy, local food, natural resource management, solid waste, smart sustainable communities, and green education and workforce. It will be used to track progress towards achieving these sustainability goals and provides an all-encompassing indicator that can be referred to for policy development.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”,  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef”. Follow Conservation International’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About the Ocean Health Index
The Ocean Health Index is a partnership between the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International. Every year since 2012, the Ocean Health Index team has tracked change in global ocean health for 220 coastal nations and territories. The team has also helped foster a growing network of independent groups around the world that are using our science to measure how healthy their own oceans are. To learn more about the global Ocean Health Index visit www.oceanhealthindex.org.

 

 

 

 

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​Arlington, Va. (May 30, 2018) – Today Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International, was named one of Fast Company's 100 Most Creative People in Business for 2018. Sanjayan joins a list featuring some…
​Arlington, Va. (May 30, 2018) – Today Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International, was named one of Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People in Business for 2018. Sanjayan joins a list featuring some of the most influential and diverse industry leaders worldwide – 56 women, 44 men, over two dozen people of color and twelve recipients from outside the U.S.

Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business issue (Summer 2018) is available online now. The official newsstand on-sale date for the print issue is June 5.

In forming the final list, Fast Company researchers scoured over candidates from numerous industries, such as technology, healthcare, and finance, who have achieved a momentous impact in their field as scientists, executives, programmers and more. The list showcases creative leaders who are driving global change and solving societal problems within their industry. This year’s list has representatives from companies such Amazon, Google, Disney, Netflix, and Lyft.

Named CEO about a year ago, Sanjayan has overseen the development and launch of the world’s largest tropical reforestation project in the Amazon, which will lead to the planting of 73 million trees and create 70,000 acres of new forests. He also served as executive producer for Conservation International’s latest virtual reality project, “My Africa,” a film that transports viewers to northern Kenya, where a community is reknitting the bonds that have long enabled people and wildlife to coexist.  He joined Conservation International as executive vice president in 2014.

Raised in Southeast Asia and Africa, Sanjayan’s unique background and expertise have attracted widespread media coverage. His appearances have included “The Today Show”, “CBS This Morning”, and “CBS Evening News”. He has also hosted or co-hosted documentaries for PBS, BBC, Discovery and Showtime. Most recently, Sanjayan hosted the Climate Lab Series for University of California and Vox Media.

Sanjayan is also a Disneynature Ambassador, a Catto Fellow at the Aspen Institute and a member of National Geographic Society’s Explorers Council.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”,  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef”. Follow Conservation International’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About Fast Company
Fast Company is one of the world’s leading business media brands, with an editorial focus on creativity, innovation, social impact, leadership, and design. Headquartered in New York City, Fast Company is published by Mansueto Ventures LLC, along with our sister publication Inc., and can be found online at fastcompany.com.

​Monrovia, Liberia (May 22, 2018) – Today, Conservation International and the Government of Liberia launched The Liberia Conservation Fund - Liberia's first independent conservation fund to provide sustainable, long-term financing for…
​Monrovia, Liberia (May 22, 2018) – Today, Conservation International and the Government of Liberia launched The Liberia Conservation Fund – Liberia’s first independent conservation fund to provide sustainable, long-term financing for the country’s protected areas. 

Conservation International has committed $1 million USD to the Fund via its Global Conservation Fund and the Government of Liberia has made a matching pledge to contribute to the Fund through the Liberia Forestry Development Authority

The Liberia Conservation Fund will direct funds from a range of conservation finance sources and set up multiple endowments to support individual protected areas throughout the country. The Fund has already established an endowment for the East Nimba Nature Reserve, one of Liberia’s five existing protected areas.

“Liberia’s protected areas are essential in maintaining the country’s rich biodiversity and ecosystems and help mitigate global climate change,” said Jessica Donovan, Conservation International Liberia Country Director. “The establishment of the Liberia Conservation Fund means the country has a guaranteed source of funding for long-term conservation initiatives.” 

“The Forestry Development Authority is committed to conserving at least 30 percent of Liberia’s forest in accordance with the 2006 Forest Reform Law. Our relationship with Conservation International has led to the establishment of the Liberia Conservation Fund and is a testament to the Liberian government’s commitment to conserving Liberia’s vast natural resources for current and future generations,” said C. Mike Doryen, Managing Director of the Liberia Forestry Development Authority.

Conservation International’s work in Liberia spans nearly two decades and includes work in improved protected area management, incentive-based community conservation, sustainable production, and national environmental policy support. Conservation International aims to demonstrate that we can achieve sustainable development in Liberia through an integrated landscape approach that seeks to balance nature conservation, production and economic development for Liberia’s people.      ​

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”,  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef”. Follow Conservation International’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About Global Conservation Fund
Since 2001, Conservation International’s Global Conservation Fund (GCF) has labored to ensure the permanent protection of natural areas most essential to human well-being through long-term financing solutions.  Made possible by a grant from the Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation, the GCF has catalyzed more than US$ 340 million for conservation in over 35 countries, supporting the conservation of 15 protected areas in over 9 countries in Africa.