​Arlington, Va. (June 20, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International (CI), on CI joining Climate Leadership Council as…
​Arlington, Va. (June 20, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International (CI), on CI joining Climate Leadership Council as a Founding Member.

“Today, Conservation International is proud to become a Founding Member of the Climate Leadership Council. The Climate Leadership Council has put together a wide-ranging coalition from the business and NGO communities to distinguished thought leaders in support of a carbon dividend plan that puts a price on carbon. This market-based approach benefits the environment by encouraging the reduction of carbon emissions and benefits the American people by providing them with a carbon dividend. Climate change poses real threats to nature and the vital services it provides to people such as food and fresh water. Conservation International welcomes innovative ideas that can lead to the reduction of carbon emissions and the mitigation of the impacts of a changing climate while protecting the American economy.”

About Conservation International
C​onservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​Innovative Virtual Reality Film Offered Viewers an Unprecedented Immersive Experience, Included a Call-to-Action to Help Save Rainforest  ​RACINE, Wis., June 7, 2017 – With Amazon rainforest deforestation once again on the…

Innovative Virtual Reality Film Offered Viewers an Unprecedented Immersive Experience, Included a Call-to-Action to Help Save Rainforest  ​

RACINE, Wis., June 7, 2017 – With Amazon rainforest deforestation once again on the rise, SC Johnson and Conservation International (CI) announced today they have completed the largest acre-for-acre match program to conserve the Amazon rainforest. SC Johnson’s match campaign will help CI preserve 10,000 acres of rainforest in the Amazon region.

The acre-for-acre campaign was promoted in conjunction with SC Johnson’s sponsorship of Under the Canopy, an immersive 360-degree virtual reality film that allows viewers to experience the wonders of the Amazon. The film, co-produced by CI and leading cinematic virtual reality company Jaunt, explores the extraordinary landscape of Amazonia guided by the indigenous people who inhabit the region and are essential to its protection. It has been seen by more than half a million viewers worldwide.

The funds from the match campaign – which garnered donations from all 50 U.S. states and 31 countries through CI’s website – will be used to protect tropical forests and replant approximately 3 million trees in the Amazon region.

“We are encouraged by the public response to Under the Canopy and to support efforts to save the Amazon rainforest. It is our hope that we can continue to inspire others to help protect this vital resource for future generations,” said Fisk Johnson, Chairman and CEO of SC Johnson.

The completion of the campaign comes as deforestation in the Amazon is on the rise. Since 2012, deforestation rates have trended upward, with a 29 percent increase last year, much of it in Brazil.  Currently, the Amazon rainforest loses 3.7 million acres-per year – forests that provide habitat for 10 percent of the world’s known species and that account for a significant portion of carbon dioxide absorbed by land each year.

Under the Canopy brings viewers to the heart of the Amazon rainforest and inspires them to protect this irreplaceable resource,” said Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International. “By supporting our Protect an Acre campaign, SC Johnson turned this inspiration into action, engaging viewers around the world in preserving this forest for the benefit of us all.”

Partnership with Conversation International

In 2009, SC Johnson became a founding member of Conservation International’s Team Earth, a worldwide sustainability effort uniting businesses, non-profit organizations, experts and individuals to address the most pressing environmental issues. SC Johnson has also worked with CI through its REDD+ program in the Peruvian Amazon to engage communities in conservation, safeguarding forests and securing livelihoods while offsetting carbon emissions.

SC Johnson, Deforestation and Brazil
As a member of the Consumer Goods Forum, SC Johnson shares its commitment to net zero deforestation by 2020 through the sustainable sourcing of pulp, paper, packaging and palm oil. The company also helped protect two reserves in Brazil’s Caatinga ecoregion in the 1990s.

In 1935, third-generation company leader H.F. Johnson Jr. led an expedition to South America to study the Carnaúba palm, whose wax was the principle ingredient in the company’s products at that time. Several decades later, fourth-generation leader Sam Johnson and his sons, including fifth-generation leader Fisk Johnson, retraced the expedition made by H.F. Johnson Jr.  

This new effort with CI also fits with SC Johnson’s commitment to reducing its own impact:

  • Since 2000, SC Johnson has cut greenhouse gas emissions from its global manufacturing sites by 51.7 percent.
  • More about SC Johnson’s sustainability progress can be found in the company’s 2016 Sustainability Report, its 25th annual report on environmental and social efforts.

About SC Johnson
SC Johnson is a family company dedicated to innovative, high-quality products, excellence in the workplace and a long-term commitment to the environment and the communities in which it operates. Based in the USA, the company is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of household cleaning products and products for home storage, air care, pest control and shoe care, as well as professional products. It markets such well-known brands as GLADE®, KIWI®, OFF!®, PLEDGE®, RAID®, SCRUBBING BUBBLES®, SHOUT®, WINDEX® and ZIPLOC® in the U.S. and beyond, with brands marketed outside the U.S. including AUTAN®, TANA®, BAMA®, BAYGON®, BRISE®, KABIKILLER®, KLEAR®, MR MUSCLE® and RIDSECT®. The 131-year-old company, which generates $10 billion in sales, employs approximately 13,000 people globally and sells products in virtually every country around the world. www.scjohnson.com

About Conservation International (CI)

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all.

CI’s first VR film, “Valen’s Reef,” tells the story of one of the most successful community-driven conservation projects in the world in the world, the Bird’s Head Seascape Initiative in Indonesia. More than 2.0 million people have viewed “Valen’s Reef since its release in June 2016. Learn more about CI, “Valen’s Reef,” and the “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

 


​Arlington, Va. (June, 1, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International: "President Trump's decision today to begin the process…
​Arlington, Va. (June, 1, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, co-founder, chairman and CEO of Conservation International:

“President Trump’s decision today to begin the process of withdrawing from the Paris Agreement is a setback for the national and economic security of the United States. It prevents our nation from having a seat at the table as the global community creates solutions for addressing climate change. This decision isolates the United States, just as our allies and our citizens most need to come together to design new technologies and new ways to manage the ecological health of our extraordinary home, Earth.

Fortunately, the president’s action will not undo the momentum coming from businesses, investors, governme​nts and citizens all around the world to address climate change. The Paris Agreement remains a pillar of international cooperation, backed by nearly every nation on Earth. Already, China and the European Union are asserting renewed leadership to lead the world forward on climate. The agreement also remains a guiding light for millions of Americans, our business community and states for addressing this shared challenge. Governments that work to address the factors of climate change will benefit from cleaner energy, healthier populations and stronger economies. As we forge ahead, Conservation International’s climate commitment — built upon a strong foundation of science and field demonstration — is to encourage and to engage with partners around the globe to reduce the threat of climate change by protecting the forests and ecosystems that can provide at least 30 percent of the solution needed to avoid the worst effects of climate change.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Arlington, Va. (June 1, 2017) -- As the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human…
Arlington, Va. (June 1, 2017) — As the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human rights violations in the seafood industry. Authored by Conservation International and a team of researchers at leading organizations, the paper is the first integrated approach to meeting this global challenge and will be presented as part of the UN Oceans Conference and the Seafood Summit, which both take place June 5-9 in New York and Seattle, respectively.

The article, published today in the journal Science, is in direct response to investigative reports by the Associated Press, The Guardian, The New York Times and other media outlets that uncovered glaring human rights violations on fishing vessels. The investigations tracked the widespread use of slave labor in Southeast Asia and its role in bringing seafood to American restaurants and supermarkets, chronicling the plight of fishermen tricked and trapped into working 22-hour days, often without pay and while enduring abuse. Subsequent investigations have documented the global extent of these abuses in a wide array of countries. 

“The scientific community has not kept pace with concerns for social issues in the seafood sector,” said Jack Kittinger, CI’s Senior Director, Global Fisheries and Aquaculture. “The purpose of this initiative is to ensure that governments, businesses, and nonprofits are working together to improve human rights, equality and food and livelihood security. This is a holistic and comprehensive approach that establishes a global standard to address these social challenges.”

As part of the initiative, Conservation International has organized a volunteer commitment, calling on governments, NGOs, businesses and other organizations to improve social responsibility in the seafood sector. For a list of organizations that have already committed to this call to action, visit: https://oceanconference.un.org/commitments.

The paper identifies three key principles that together establish a global standard for social responsibility in the seafood sector:  protecting human rights, dignity and respecting access to resources; ensuring equality and equitable opportunities to benefit; and improving food and livelihood security.

Seafood is the world’s most internationally traded food commodity. By 2030, the oceans will need to supply more than 150 million metric tons of seafood to meet the demands of a growing population. The paper calls on governments, businesses and the scientific community to take measurable steps to ensure seafood is sourced without harm to the environment and people that work in the seafood industry.

CI’s Human Nature blog provides a first-hand account of enslaved Thai fishermen and the people working at the forefront of this issue.

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​Arlington, Va. (May 24, 2017) – The following is a statement by Peter Seligmann, Conservation International's co-founder, chairman and CEO, on the President's FY2018 Budget Request, which would dramatically reduce funding for cost-effective…
Arlington, Va. (May 24, 2017) – The following is a statement by Peter Seligmann, Conservation International’s co-founder, chairman and CEO, on the President’s FY2018 Budget Request, which would dramatically reduce funding for cost-effective U.S. foreign assistance.

“There is a direct connection between the protection of nature’s assets and America’s economic and national security interests. In flashpoints around the world, the depletion of natural resources such as food and fresh water contributes to instability, conflict, migration, radicalization, and in the worst case, failed states.

“The risks to America’s national and economic security from resource scarcity and wildlife crime are increasingly clear. Strategic investments in international conservation promote effective foreign policy that can mitigate the drivers of violent extremism and transnational organized crime. As nature’s ability to provide essential services becomes further tested, continued U.S. leadership on international conservation funding is essential. 

“Congress has consistently expressed strong bipartisan support for international conservation. Conservation International welcomes the opportunity to work with Congress and the Administration on next steps in the FY2018 appropriations process to sustain strategic international conservation investments that promote U.S. jobs and prosperity, and help to ensure the safety and security of the American people.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

CI-Statement-on-Paris-Climate-Agreement

​Arlington, Va. (May 31, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, cofounder, chairman and chief executive officer of Conservation International: "Conservation International encourages President Trump to keep…
​Arlington, Va. (May 31, 2017) – The following statement was released today by Peter Seligmann, cofounder, chairman and chief executive officer of Conservation International: 
“Conservation International encourages President Trump to keep America’s seat at the table by staying in the Paris Agreement. Confronting climate change is essential for our economy, businesses and jobs, and it demands a global effort. The United States ought to lead the world in addressing this global challenge.” 
About Conservation International
Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

 

 

 

​Co-Founder Peter​ Seligmann Remains Chairman of the Board Arlington, Va. (May 4, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) announced a new executive leadership team today, naming conservation scientist M. Sanjayan chief…


​Co-Founder Peter​ Seligmann Remains Chairman of the Board

Arlington, Va. (May 4, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) announced a new executive leadership team today, naming conservation scientist M. Sanjayan chief executive officer. Sanjayan succeeds longtime CEO and co-founder Peter Seligmann, who has led the organization since its founding in 1987 and will remain chairman of CI’s Board. Jennifer Morris, chief operating officer, has been named president and Sebastian Troëng, senior vice president of the Americas Field Division, has been named executive vice president. ​​

All positions become effective July 1, 2017.

“Today the stakes for the future of our planet and human well-being could not be higher, but I have great faith in passing the torch to a world class leadership team,” said Seligmann on behalf of CI’s Board. “Creating a healthier, more prosperous planet is an urgent task, and requires a diverse team. Sanjayan is a field-tested conservation leader with a remarkable ability to bring people together and inspire action. I have enormous confidence in his vision and his wisdom.”

Seligmann continued, “Jennifer Morris and Sebastian Troëng are gifted leaders. Jennifer is a first-rate expert in both conservation finance and conservation delivery and has guided our operations and field programs for close to two decades. Sebastian began in our marine program, led the Moore Center for Oceans and Science and now leads CI’s Americas Division. These are exceptional people and I am grateful that they are taking on expanded roles at CI. This organization has been my life’s work and I’m honored to be able to continue in my role as chairman of the board and to support its bright future.”

“It is both a privilege and deeply humbling to step into the role of chief executive officer,” said Sanjayan. “Peter Seligmann’s founding vision, that people need nature to thrive, created a global movement that has helped change the trajectory of our planet. I’m honored to partner with Jennifer Morris, our new president, Sebastian Troëng, our new executive vice president, and all of CI’s talented staff on the journey ahead.”

“The board is delighted in this new leadership team, which already has a strong track record of creating solutions to some of today’s most pressing global challenges,” said Rob Walton, chairman of Conservation International’s executive committee. “Each one of these leaders are well-positioned to continue Conservation International’s legacy of delivering on its mission to protect nature for our benefit today and the benefit of generations to come.”

“Today’s announcement is the result of a very thoughtful and thorough process and we are delighted with the results,” said Orin Smith, the retired president and CEO of Starbucks and a CI board member who served on the selection committee. “These are incredibly talented individuals who will, together, continue CI’s legacy of designing and executing the kind of innovative and science-based solutions that deliver results for people across the world.”

Sanjayan joined CI in 2014 as executive vice president and senior scientist and has led several divisions including Oceans, Science, Development, Brand and Communications and Strategic Priorities. Some of his most high profile work includes pioneering CI’s use of virtual reality filmmaking to raise awareness of global conservation issues.” He holds a master’s degree from University of Oregon, a doctorate from University of California, Santa Cruz, and his scientific work has been published in leading peer-reviewed journals including
Science,
Nature and
Conservation Biology. Sanjayan is a visiting researcher at UCLA and distinguished professor of practice at Arizona State University.

Raised in South Asia and Africa, Sanjayan’s unique background has attracted widespread media coverage. In 2008, he was profiled in Time magazine (Changing the White Face of the Green Movement.) Profiles in Outside magazine and Afar magazine followed, and his expertise has received coverage from outlets such as Vanity Fair, Men’s Journal and the New York Times, among others.

Sanjayan is also a leading science communicator, hosting and cohosting a range of documentaries for PBS, BBC, and Discovery including the PBS and BBC live television event
Big Blue Live and hosting the PBS series
Earth – A New Wild. He is the host of the University of California and Vox Media’s new
Climate Lab series and served as a correspondent for
Years of Living Dangerously, Showtime’s Emmy-winning series on climate change.

Morris, a 20-year veteran of CI and a pioneer in the long-term financing of protected areas, will serve as president. Her extensive field work includes Asia, Africa and Latin America. Morris joined CI fresh out of graduate school and rose through the ranks to lead some of CI’s most lasting and influential investment and business engagement initiatives, including CI’s Center for Environmental Leadership in Business and the Global Conservation Fund, which has helped protect nearly 200 million acres worldwide and brought millions of dollars to conservation and communities around the world.

She is one of the conservation movement’s youngest and most prominent female executives and, since 2014, has served as CI’s chief operating officer.

Morris holds a bachelor’s in political science from Emory University and a master’s in international affairs with a business development and micro-finance focus from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

Troëng brings over eight years as member of CI’s senior leadership team, working across the globe on some of the organization’s most high-profile initiatives, including the development of its Ocean Health Index, the first assessment tool that scientifically measures all elements of global ocean health.

Proficient in six languages, Troëng is a prolific writer, fundraiser, and science communicator specializing in the role of nature in supporting both sustainable development and ensuring human well-being worldwide. His research has been published extensively in leading peer-reviewed journals and in 2010 he was recognized
as a “40 Under 40” leader in international development.

Troëng joined CI in 2006 as a director of regional marine strategies and went on to lead CI’s Betty and Gordon Moore Center for Science and Oceans and, later, CI’s Americas Field Division.

He holds a master’s degree in marine environmental protection from the University of Wales and a Doctoral degree in animal zoology from Lund University, Sweden.

Seligmann, along with Spencer Beebe, founded CI in 1987 with the vision that conservation must prioritize the economic well-being of local and indigenous communities, and that environmentalism must move from corporate philanthropy to the corporate bottom line.

“We did not want to create something new, but we did because we had a fundamentally different view of how to achieve conservation in the world,” writes Seligmann in a post published today on CI’s blog, Human Nature.

Seligmann and CI’s former president, Dr. Russell Mittermeier, pioneered new tactics including the first debt-for-nature swap, “biodiversity hot-spot” conservation, shade-grown coffee – all while convincing major corporations like Walmart, HP, Starbucks, Alcoa, HP and others that preserving nature was in their “enlightened self-interest.”

“Our mantra became ‘head in the sky, feet in the mud’ and it still is,” said Seligmann. “Today we are one of the biggest conservation organizations in the world, but we will always be, in spirit, a start-up.”

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking
“Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on
Facebook,
Twitter,
Instagram and
YouTube.

​“May the Fourth Be with You” Brings Discovery of Two New Yoda Lookalike SpeciesArlington, Va. (May 4, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) scientists and collaborators in the U.S., Indonesia and…

​“May the Fourth Be with You” Brings Discovery of Two New Yoda Lookalike Species

Arlington, Va. (May 4, 2017) – Conservation International (CI) scientists and collaborators in the U.S., Indonesia and Australia announced today the discovery of two new species of tarsier. Tarsiers, small nocturnal primates, are believed to have been the inspiration behind the Star Wars character Yoda. The announcement comes as fans commemorate Star Wars Day and primatologists celebrate International Tarsier Day.

Tarsiers have the largest eyes relative to body size of any mammal on earth, each typically larger than their brain. Similar to owls, tarsiers can rotate their necks a full 180 degrees in either direction. Their unique anatomy allows them to be vertical clingers and leapers – they can jump 40 times their body length in a single leap. They are some of the oldest primates on the planet, dating back about 60 million years.

The two new species were found in Sulawesi, one of Indonesia’s main islands, and have been documented in the journal Primate Conservation. One of the two new species, Tarsius supriatnai has been named after Dr. Jatna Supriatna, a primatologist and biodiversity specialist who led CI’s work in Indonesia for 15 years. The second, Tarsius spectrumgurskyae, is named after Dr. Sharon Gursky, professor at Texas A&M University, a close colleague of Dr. Supriatna and an expert on tarsiers. She has dedicated more than 20 years of her academic career to studying them.

The discovery of these species is critical to conservation efforts in a region grappling with the effects of deforestation and climate change. Sulawesi is home to species found nowhere else on earth. This discovery is key to conserving the habitats critical to these species and many more. With these two new tarsiers, the total number of primates in Indonesia rises to 80 and the number of recognized tarsier species from Sulawesi and nearby islands rises to 11.

“These two new species of tarsier from Sulawesi are the 80th and 81st primate species new to science described since the turn of the century. This represents about 16% of all primate species known and is indicative of how little we know of our planet’s unique and wonderful biodiversity,” says Russ Mittermeier, founder of Conservation International and coauthor of the publication. “If we haven’t even gotten a handle on the diversity our closest living relatives, which by comparison are relatively well-studied, imagine how much we still have to learn about the rest of life on Earth.”

The authors of this study include Conservation International’s Executive Vice Chair, Dr. Russell Mittermeier; Dr. Ibnu Maryanto, a senior scientist at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences; Professor Colin Groves, of Australian National University and world leader in primate taxonomy; and Dr. Myron Shekelle, from Western Washington University and Manado State University, who has been studying the evolution of tarsiers for over two decades.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

​Global Effort to Make Your Morning Coffee Sustainable​​​​​​April 17, 2017 -- The Sustainable Coffee Challenge, a coalition of over 65 partners including corporations, governments, NGOs and research organizations, today announced…

Global Effort to Make Your Morning Coffee Sustainable​​​​​​

April 17, 2017 — The Sustainable Coffee Challenge, a coalition of over 65 partners including corporations, governments, NGOs and research organizations, today announced the first four Collective Action Networks to further its effort to make coffee the first sustainable agricultural product in the world.

The future of coffee depends on the ability of the sector to find effective solutions that address the greatest challenges facing coffee.  Sustaining coffee in light of climate variability, aging farmers, aging trees and volatile markets will require new collaborations that effectively replicate and scale up successful programs efficiently.

“A key tenet of the Sustainable Coffee Challenge is to encourage partners to tackle some of the most pressing challenges facing the coffee sector by working collaboratively. We invite all stakeholders to join in these efforts,” said Conservation International’s Bambi Semroc, who leads the Sustainable Coffee Challenge. “By joining together we will be able to transform the coffee sector and ensure its future while also creating a roadmap for other agricultural products to follow.”

The Global Specialty Coffee EXPO taking place this week in Seattle, WA, will kick-start a 100-day process to establish targets and milestones for each of the following Collective Action Networks:

Coffee Farm Renovation and Rehabilitation

Coffee farmers rely on productive and resilient trees to remain in the market and sustain their livelihoods. Yet disease, age, and climate change threaten the ability of current trees to keep up with growing demand. According to a 2015 IDH study, there is a need to replant an estimated 2.2 million hectares globally. Assuming 3,500 trees per hectare, this translates into roughly 7 billion coffee trees to meet future demand. This initiative establishes a 1 billion coffee tree target and will identify best practices for farm renovation and rehabilitation that ensures positive outcomes for both productivity and the environment.

“The objective is to coordinate efforts, share experiences and resources to accelerate renovation of coffee farms and to leverage these commitments to unlock additional resources for rehabilitation of coffee and reforestation on coffee farms.” said Semroc.

Members of this initiative include Arizona State University, Conservation International, Counter Culture Coffee, ECOM, Fairtrade International, Mexico’s Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (SAGARPA), Root Capital, Starbucks, TechnoServe, U.S. Agency for International Development, UTZ and World Coffee Research.

Improved Labor Practices and Labor Supply

Climate change, rural to urban migration, and market volatility are disrupting labor supply and practices across the industry. The coffee sector is increasingly recognizing the need to ensure a continued supply of labor and good labor conditions for these workers and new initiatives are emerging to address these issues. Labor conditions in the agricultural sector, however, are bigger than any one company, government agency or even sector. The group will review these efforts and develop new, scalable approaches to improving labor conditions in high priority areas. 

Members of this initiative include Conservation International, Catholic Relief Services, Counter Culture Coffee, Fairtrade International, Keurig Green Mountain, Inc., the Specialty Coffee Association and UTZ.

Scaling Up Sustainable Coffee Sourcing

Many retailers and roasters are making commitments to sustainably source their coffee – and many others are considering how they could make and achieve such a commitment.  This effort asks participants to work together to achieve sustainable sourcing commitments and inspire others to set sourcing targets. Through this initiative, companies who are advanced in these efforts will share their experiences, metrics, and best practices to help other retailers and roasters along their path to sustainability. 

“There is tremendous opportunity to share experiences and lessons learned to avoid reinventing the wheel and develop sustainable markets even further,” said Semroc.

Conservation International, Fairtrade International, Fair Trade USA, Farmer Brothers, Keurig Green Mountain, Inc., McDonald’s, S&D Coffee & Tea, Solidaridad, The Sustainability Consortium, and UTZ have all initially signed onto this initiative.

Mapping + Monitoring of Coffee and Forests

As rising temperatures, drought and changing weather patterns push coffee crops into new areas, this initiative will enable the industry to better monitor how coffee is impacting forest cover. Participants will work to identify innovative ways of mapping and monitoring the extent of coffee and forests in priority geographies most likely to experience significant shifts in suitable areas due to climate change. This work will enable the industry to understand the role of coffee in deforestation and forest conservation and where additional incentives for conservation are needed.  In addition, members of this initiative will explore opportunities for scaling up innovations that combine productivity with conservation.

Members of the Mapping + Monitoring of Coffee and Forests include Arizona State University, Conservation International, Fairtrade International, The Sustainability Consortium, and UTZ.

Industry members interested in joining the Sustainable Coffee Challenge are encouraged to contact scc@conservation.org. ​

About the Sustainable Coffee Challenge

The Sustainable Coffee Challenge convenes, unites and urges the coffee sector and conservation partners across the industry to spur the actions and investments necessary to make coffee the first sustainable agriculture product in the world. The Challenge is committed to stimulating demand for sustainable coffee across the value chain, from the policymaking level to the final consumer. By encouraging demand for sustainable coffee, it leads to investments that enable the transition to a sustainable production and ensuring the coffee we drink is a sustainable product.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.​

​​​​​Arlington, Va. (April 12, 2017) – New research​ published today in Conservation Letters finds that over half of fish stocks are below levels that would yield greater long-term catches, enhance…

​​​​​Arlington, Va. (April 12, 2017) – New research​ published today in Conservation Letters finds that over half of fish stocks are below levels that would yield greater long-term catches, enhance food security and avoid overfishing. Of those fish stocks, over a third are at 80 percent below sustainable catch.

The new findings are the result of an “ensemble modeling” approach that provides more detailed analysis of fish stocks than previously available.

The study and new methodology, which analyzed 785 fish stocks globally, received funding from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, Conservation International (CI) and The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Approximately three billion people depend on seafood as their main source of protein, and overfishing is a critical issue for food and livelihood security worldwide. Yet previous methods for evaluating fish stocks were only applied to smaller subset stocks or were based on expert input and not consistently calculated, providing an incomplete picture of their status for managers.

“Previous attempts to estimate fish stock status would broadly tell us if a fish stock was fully or overexploited,” said one of the lead authors, Dr. Elizabeth Selig, in an interview posted today on Human Nature, CI’s blog. “Our work shows just how far a given stock is from achieving its ideal or sustainable yield, which can help fisheries managers determine how best to manage their stock to increase yields. In the past, stocks received a pass or fail, which sometimes results in missing the opportunity to deliver greater economic and nutritional benefits to people.”

The authors note their findings hold significant promise for communities who are particularly dependent on seafood, but who have stocks that are not part of large-scale monitoring efforts.

“All of the attention can’t be focused on the major fisheries for the export market — there must also be an emphasis on getting the best results from local fisheries that feed local people,” said Dr. Andrew Rosenberg, director of the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Center for Science and Democracy and lead author of the paper.

“Demand for seafood from a protein-hungry and growing middle class will need to be met by far more sustainable supply within this generation, and we believe understanding data-limited fisheries will be critical for establishing more sustainable supply chains,” explained Sabine Miltner, program director for Moore’s conservation and markets initiatives. “We’re grateful for this important progress on alternative, and perhaps more efficient, means to gaining that understanding.”

To learn more about CI’s work with fisheries, visit the
Human Nature blog.

About the Betty and Gordon Moore Foundation

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation fosters path-breaking scientific discovery, environmental conservation, patient care improvements and preservation of the special character of the Bay Area. Visit Moore.org or follow
@MooreFound.

About Conservation International

Conservation International (CI) uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, CI works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all.
Learn more about CI and its groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign, and follow CI’s work on
Facebook,
Twitter,
Instagram and
YouTube.