​​New Memorandum of Understanding between the Government and NGO Conservation International will use one of the world's largest marine protected areas to demonstrate a win-win for nature, people and economy.Noumea,…
​​New Memorandum of Understanding between the Government and NGO Conservation International will use one of the world’s largest marine protected areas to demonstrate a win-win for nature, people and economy.

Noumea, New Caledonia (February​ 12, 2019) – Today the Government of New Caledonia and non-profit NGO, Conservation International inked a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate on the protection and improved management of the Natural Park of the Coral Sea, which at 1.3M square kilometers is one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, through integrated sustainable development and regional cooperation.

The partners aim to use the marine protected area – an area more than twice the size of mainland France – to demonstrate the importance of nature and how its sustainable use can support not only economic development and provide lasting gains, but also ensure long-term human wellbeing. They noted that the involvement of local people  as active stakeholders and stewards of nature is essential to this effort, so that all needs and uses, public, private, and industrial are addressed.

Dr. Richard Jeo, the Senior Vice-President of Conservation International’s Asia Pacific Field Division, and signee, said, ‘We’re excited about this partnership with New Caledonia as they are leaders in sustainable development and nature conservation.  New Caledonia is committed to reinventing itself as a nature-based economy.’

‘While our work is aimed at primarily benefitting the citizens and protecting the pristine and unique biodiversity found in these waters, the ultimate measure of success for our organisation is to make this, and every other investment made in nature, an effective and significant model to inspire others. Never before in human history has nature-based solutions been more important.’

Dr. Jeo paid respects to other ground-breaking marine conservation commitments from the Pacific Islands region, which Conservation International have helped design and remain highly involved in through the Pacific Oceanscape, including the Cook Islands’ Marae Moana and Kiribati’s Phoenix Islands Protected Area, noting that it is Conservation International’s experience, knowledge and learnings from these efforts from which this conservation model builds on.

The agreement describes plans to develop tools and innovative conservation projects that promote the link between nature and culture in New Caledonia. This includes the amplification of Conservation International’straditional voyaging project in Samoa which the NGO has implemented with the Samoa Voyaging Society and Government, providing powerful conservation workshops to coastal communities, using shared culture and modern science. The partners also plan to promote and strengthen the Caledonian model of sustainable fisheries by extending cooperation with Arctic Circle and neighboring countries on Responsible Fisheries, especially in the areas of transparency, efficiency, and certification.

For more information, contact:

Emmeline Johansen, Communications Director, Asia Pacific Field Division, Conservation International | Mobile +64 277 793 401 | Email: ejohansen@conservation.org  

About Conservation International in New Caledonia

With over 30 years of experience in global conservation, and over 16 years working directly in New Caledonia with communities, government and the private sector, the CI New Caledonia office have helped to define environmental policies and strategies in New Caledonia, define key biodiversity areas for protection in all three provinces, and create their single protected area in co-management between indigenous people and provincial authority. Building upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, CI empowers societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature and its global biodiversity to promote the long-term well-being of people. Founded in 1987 and headquartered in the Washington, D.C. area. CI employs 900 staff in nearly 30 countries on four continents and works with more than 1,000 partners around the world. Learn more about our work in the Pacific:

http://www.conservation.org/where/pages/pacific-oceanscape.aspx

About New Caledonia and the Natural Park of the Coral Sea
The Natural Park of the Coral Sea (NPCS) is the world’s largest multiple use marine park encompassing the entire EEZ at the time of establishment in April, 2014). These waters are sanctuaries to sharks, whales, turtles and Manta Rays and are home to the world’s third-largest population of dugong. Additionally, the New Caledonia territory boasts one of the world’s largest lagoons at 24,000 km2, circled by a 1,600 km2 coral reef which 1.5M ha are listed as World Heritage Sites. On land, New Caledonia is the smallest hotspots in the world (the size of New Jersey) but boasts the highest endemic species diversity per square kilometer. The greatest challenges to nature in New Caledonia include climate change, invasive species, mining, bushfires and erosion.

 

​ 

Arlington, Va. (January 25, 2019) – "Dulce," a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, began screening today as a selection in the Documentary Short section of the Sundance Institute's 2019 Sundance Film…

Arlington, Va. (January 25, 2019) – “Dulce,” a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, began screening today as a selection in the Documentary Short section of the Sundance Institute’s 2019 Sundance Film Festival. It will run from January 24 – February 3, 2019 in Park City, Utah. Tickets are available here.

In June, “Dulce” premiered at the Palm Springs International ShortFest where it won Best Documentary Short. At the Toronto International Film Festival in August, the short documentary film was selected to screen. It is currently featured on The New York Times Op-Docs channel. 

Filmed in La Ensenada on the Pacific coast of Colombia, the film follows a young girl, Dulce, whose small fishing community is struggling with the effects of climate change on their lives. In Dulce’s community, climate change means higher tides from rising sea levels. 

“Dulce” was co-directed by Guille Isa and Angello Faccini and produced by filmmakers Jungles in Paris. It was executive produced by actor and activist Lee Pace, and Margarita Mora and Anastasia Khoo on behalf of Conservation International. 

As the film opens, Dulce is being taught to swim by her mother, Betty. For this community, swimming is survival: It is a skill Dulce needs to carry on her family’s livelihood harvesting piangua, a type of clam, from nearby mangroves. Meanwhile, rising tides have wiped out entire villages in recent years near La Ensenada, heightening Betty’s urgency to help Dulce master this skill. 

“The decision to tell this story through the eyes of a mother and daughter was deliberate. Across the globe, women are on the front lines of climate change. The urgency we feel as Betty struggles to teach her daughter to swim reminds us that that women are more likely than men to feel the impacts of climate change, especially in the developing world,” said Anastasia Khoo, Conservation International’s Chief Marketing Officer. “Increasingly, they are also the ones rising to the challenge to speak up and force change.”

In the tradition of Conservation International’s other films (“Nature is Speaking,” “Valen’s Reef,” “Under the Canopy” and the recently released “My Africa”), “Dulce” puts a human face on the quest for environmental protection. 

For Conservation International, it is an effective strategy. Viewers of “Under the Canopy” responded by helping the organization, with the backing of SC Johnson, to protect 10,000 acres of rainforest in record time. 

Jungles in Paris, cofounded by Oliver and Darrell Hartman in 2013, also has been recognized for its environmental-themed films. The mission-driven media company focuses on subjects of nature and culture, having produced short documentaries featured at festivals such as Hot Docs, Atlanta and Big Sky. 

Co-directors Isa and Faccini have also seen their work presented in numerous international film festivals. Isa’s films have appeared at Barcelona, Amsterdam, Riverrun, Sidewalk and more. Faccini has among his film credits Lina (2016), a winner of a Young Director’s Award at Cannes and Best Direction Award at the Malaga Film Festival. 

Assets for media use:

Social media: https://www.facebook.com/DulceDoc/

Images: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Wj-qv4mnUkBmiEaisPWC2hLTH-3tkaA0      

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy”and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

About Jungles in Paris 
Jungles in Paris, founded in 2013 and based in New York City, tells stories about nature and culture. We use a range of media to explore planet Earth in all its multi-colored diversity, with a special focus on roots and place. Spotlighting craft, culture, geography and wildlife, we aim to celebrate subjects — human and non-human alike — that are often at risk of extinction in a globalized, growth-driven 21st century. We prioritize the local, the endemic, the time-honored, and the meaningful. Rather than pure advocacy, we practice purpose-driven media. We aim in our work to restore a sense of enchantment 
around the things that matter, employing creative nonfiction methods to propose a more enlightened way of engaging with the ecosystems and cultural possibilities around us.

About Sundance Institute
Founded in 1981 by Robert Redford, Sundance Institute is a nonprofit organization that provides and preserves the space for artists in film, theatre, and new media to create and thrive. The Institute’s signature Labs, granting, and mentorship programs, dedicated to developing new work, take place throughout the year in the U.S. and internationally. The Sundance Film Festival and other public programs connect audiences to artists in igniting new ideas, discovering original voices, and building a community dedicated to independent storytelling. Sundance Institute has supported such projects as Mudbound, Get Out, The Big Sick, Strong Island, Blackfish, Top of the Lake, Winter’s Bone, The Wolfpack, Dear White People, Brooklyn, Little Miss Sunshine, 20 Feet From Stardom, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fruitvale Station, Spring Awakening, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder and Fun Home.

​ 

​​Partnership to Improve Fisheries in Developing Regions of the WorldArlington, Va. (January 14, 2019) – Conservation International and Ocean Outcomes (O2) today announced a global partnership to establish a more…
​​Partnership to Improve Fisheries in Developing Regions of the World

Arlington, Va. (January 14, 2019) – Conservation International and Ocean Outcomes (O2) today announced a global partnership to establish a more sustainable seafood supply chain. By leveraging each other’s experience and expertise, both organizations will develop and apply strategic approaches that will shift fisheries toward more environmentally sustainable, socially responsible and economically viable models.

Through the partnership, organizations will jointly demonstrate the benefits of sustainable fisheries at any scale based upon best practices in ecological, social and business performance. In addition to existing efforts, Conservation International and O2 will jointly fundraise for future projects which address the myriad environmental, social and economic issues facing many fisheries.

“Conservation International’s partnership with Ocean Outcomes brings together our respective strengths to support the transition of fisheries to sustainable production,” said Dr. Jack Kittinger, Senior Director, Global Fisheries and Aquaculture Program at Conservation International. “Our strengths in policy reform and capacity development, together with the market and entrepreneurship expertise of Ocean Outcomes creates a powerful alliance that will improve ecosystem stewardship and support sustainable livelihoods globally.”

This alliance will combine Conservation International’s worldwide success working with communities and governments to transform fisheries towards sustainability using a three-tiered approach of 1) implementation of effective governance; 2) building community capacities and 3) alignment of incentives for sustainable harvesting with Ocean Outcomes’ expertise in fishery improvement, management, science and supply chain. 

“From a sustainability needs perspective, developing-world fisheries are highly complex. Approaches which leverage collective tools, strategies and relationships – such as those provided with our new partnership with Conservation International – broaden the scope of our toolbox so we can collectively better address fishery needs across the globe,” said Dick Jones, President and CEO at Ocean Outcomes.

Already, Conservation International has co-created assessment tools for evaluating fisheries’ social sustainability performance and local fishers’ organizational capacities, linking these with Ocean Outcomes’ co-developed Rapid Assessment Tool for Fisheries Improvement projects (FIPs) and market and supply chain understanding. This ensures that fisheries pursuing social, environmental and economic improvements can work through a consistent and familiar process.

Conservation International and Ocean Outcomes have been on the ground together in Costa Rica, working to understand and advance improvement of socioeconomic and environmental viability of queen croaker fisheries in the Gulf of Nicoya. They are also in Suriname, assessing the actions needed to improve the sustainability of small-scale finfish fisheries. Currently, both organizations are developing joint projects in Mexico and the Galápagos Islands, among others.

Find out more information about Conservation International’s work in sustainable fisheries here.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About Ocean Outcomes
Ocean Outcomes is an international organization that works with local communities, fisheries, and the seafood industry to improve the environmental, social, and economic sustainability of fisheries and aquaculture operations. Learn more at oceanoutcomes.org

​Cape Town, South Africa (January 15, 2019) – Conservation International and Peace Parks Foundation are urging policy makers in South Africa to use a non-geographic based trade approach following an…
​Cape Town, South Africa (January 15, 2019) – Conservation International and Peace Parks Foundation are urging policy makers in South Africa to use a non-geographic based trade approach following an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in cattle in the Vhembe District of Limpopo, South Africa. Foot-and-mouth disease, which affects cloven hoofed livestock and wildlife, has the potential to not only devastate southern Africa’s agriculture, but to also pose a huge threat to conservation and rural development. While the virus is highly contagious, it does not affect people or pose a public health risk like listeria or mad cow disease.

The management of the outbreak has the potential to have a significant economic impact due to bans on movement and exports of livestock. Farmers in the infected zones cannot move their animals and associated products outside of the area, effectively eliminating their ability to sell and earn income. The export ban also affects the entire livestock industry due to the crash in domestic prices.

Geographic-based bans also have negative environmental impacts. In southern Africa and across the region, foot-and-mouth disease naturally occurs in free roaming African buffalo that reside in large conservation areas. These areas and surrounding landscapes, are therefore deemed infected zones. As a result, communities living adjacent to wildlife areas have no way to derive a livelihood from their livestock, resulting in reduced animal off-take during dry periods. Guided by outdated international trade standards, governments spend fortunes to build or try to maintain game-proof fences that separate infected zones from others. In many instances, such fences severely affect biodiversity conservation and tourism development efforts. 

Sarah Frazee, Chief Executive Officer, Conservation International South Africa, joins others in making the following policy recommendations: 

1. Policy-makers must adopt and implement an already available “commodity-based trade” (CBT) standard that focuses on the risk associated with the product to be traded as opposed to the risk associated with the area of origin. This non-geographic based trade approach does not require disease free status for exports or local trade, but rather relies on risk mitigation measures implemented along the value chain of a product. This approach radically reduces the impact of an outbreak by ensuring non-infected animals are still able to be used to generate revenue and livelihoods if products derived from it can be proved to pose negligible risk. 
2. Legislatures must respond to this latest threat by integrating and creating an enabling policy framework for commodity-based trade that is science-based. The testing and development of non-geographic trade standards for both domestic and international trade must become a national priority in line with the vision of the Southern African Development Community who resolved to support CBT since the Phakalane Declaration in 2012.”Establishing “no trade zones” and placing blanket export bans hurt livestock farmers and conservation alike,” said Frazee. “A non-geographic, science based trade approach is much more effective in mitigating socio-economic losses for farmers and for conservation and development, while still maintaining the appropriate health and biosafety measures.”​
“Establishing “no trade zones” and placing blanket export bans hurt livestock farmers and conservation alike,” said Frazee. “A non-geographic, science based trade approach is much more effective in mitigating socio-economic losses for farmers and for conservation and development, while still maintaining the appropriate health and biosafety measures.” 
Since 2017, through the Herding for Health Programme, Conservation International, Peace Parks Foundation and South African National Parks have supported a new social enterprise, Meat Naturally, to pioneer the use of commodity-based trade protocols to facilitate market access for communal farmers living adjacent to Kruger National Park in exchange for improved rangeland management and wildlife protection in the buffer zone. Gerbrand Nel, general manager of Meat Naturally, states, “the outbreak has already caused a 50 percent decrease in prices paid to farmers in our operating areas.”

For media interviews contact Dr. Jacques van Rooyen, jvanrooyen@conservation.org; +27-83-289-1312; or +258-87-0374803.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.  

About Peace Parks Foundation
The Peace Parks Foundation dream is to reconnect Africa’s wild spaces to create a future for man in harmony with nature. In order to achieve its vision of “Restoring Tomorrow” for life on earth, the Foundation works to renew and preserve large, functional ecosystems that stretch across international boundaries through the establishment of transfrontier conservation areas.  In so doing Peace Parks safeguards the integrity of biological diversity, whilst protecting and regenerating vital natural resources and cultural heritage. At the same time the Foundation contributes to the development of shared economic benefits and poverty alleviation by harnessing the potential for ecotourism development to provide sustainable economic growth, as well as fosters community engagement and beneficiation initiatives for those living in and around these conservation areas.

​​Arlington, Va. (January 15, 2019) – Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan today released the following statement after President Donald Trump signed into law the Tropical Forest Conservation Reauthorization Act. "Make…
​​Arlington, Va. (January 15, 2019) – Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan today released the following statement after President Donald Trump signed into law the Tropical Forest Conservation Reauthorization Act.

“Make no mistake about it, this legislation is climate leadership,” said Sanjayan. “We all know by now that tropical forests provide the air we breathe and the water we drink – reasons enough to fight for their preservation. But tropical forests are also the best carbon capture and storage technology we have.

“That’s because there is more carbon stored in the world’s tropical forests than present in the entire atmosphere. And when these carbon-rich stores are cutdown and cleared, that carbon is released into the atmosphere, accelerating climate change.  

“This legislation represents the kind of bold, bipartisan leadership we need if we are going to preserve the nature we all rely on for our well-being and a stable climate. I thank the bill’s sponsors – many of whom have been strong supporters of the environment – Representatives Chabot, Sherman, Royce, Engle, Fortenberry, McCollum, Smith and Grijalva and Senators Portman, Udall, Burr, Whitehouse and Schatz for their support and the president for signing it into law.”

The Act reauthorizes a highly successful debt-for-nature program that has saved more than 68 million acres of tropical forests – roughly the equivalent of taking nearly 12 million cars off the road for one year. The reauthorization also expands these efforts to conserve coral reef ecosystems. 

Debt-for-nature swaps were first pioneered by Conservation International over 30 years ago.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.  

 

 

​ 

​Arlington, Va. (January 9, 2019) – Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan released the following statement on H.R. 4819, the Defending Economic Livelihoods and Threatened Animals (DELTA) Act, becoming law.…
​Arlington, Va. (January 9, 2019) – Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan released the following statement on H.R. 4819, the Defending Economic Livelihoods and Threatened Animals (DELTA) Act, becoming law. The Act is a bipartisan effort that will promote inclusive economic growth and conservation and biodiversity programs in southern Africa’s important Okavango watershed region. 

“Environmental leadership in the U.S. has long been a bipartisan effort and today, the DELTA Act joins that proud history. 

“The greater Okavango delta is like no other place in the world. Sometimes called Africa’s ‘Last Eden,’ the Okavango delta supports the largest population of elephants in the world and is crucial to jobs and livelihoods of over a million people across three countries. Rich in nature and culture, and a magnet for tourists from the US and around the world, the delta is under threat from unsustainable development, demands on water, and wildlife poaching.  

“With this legislation, the U.S. will be able to lend its expertise to help combat wildlife trafficking and promote sound development practices that will meet the needs of the communities who are dependent on the delta and increase social and economic stability in southern Africa.  

“This legislation is a great example of U.S. global leadership in international conservation. Conservation International has a long history in supporting the people and nature, which also happens to be one of my favorite places in the world. I’d like to thank the bill’s sponsors, many of whom have been strong supporters of the environment, Representatives Jeff Fortenberry, Ed Royce, and Eliot Engle and Senators Portman, Udall, Burr, Coons, and Whitehouse for their hard work on this legislation,” said Sanjayan.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

​​

​​Arlington, Va. (January 8, 2019) – Richard Jeo has been named Senior Vice President of Conservation International's Asia-Pacific Field Division. Dr. Jeo has more than 20 years of experience working in conservation…
​​Arlington, Va. (January 8, 2019) – Richard Jeo has been named Senior Vice President of Conservation International’s Asia-Pacific Field Division. Dr. Jeo has more than 20 years of experience working in conservation and conservation science around the globe.

Most recently, he served as the State Director for The Nature Conservancy in Montana, where he led programs that permanently protected over 250,000 acres of critically important private lands, facilitating large-scale connectivity across forest, freshwater and grassland ecosystems. During his long career at The Nature Conservancy, Dr. Jeo played leadership roles in some of the largest successful conservation deals ever completed including the 2009 Great Bear Rainforest agreements with Coastal First Nations in Canada that encompassed over 21 million acres and the $500 million Montana Legacy project that transferred over 310,000 acres of forest to public ownership.   

Dr. Jeo has extensive experience in strategy, management and private philanthropy in the United States, Canada, Kenya and Namibia, including the design and launch a $120M comprehensive capital campaign in 2017 in Montana. He has led a wide variety of scientific research programs ranging from coral reefs and tropical island ecosystems in the Caribbean to reducing conflicts between cheetahs and local communities in Namibia. His career has consistently yielded high impact conservation results, working effectively with partners, and ensuring that those results are sustained through significant funds raised for conservation. All of these and many other skills he brings are directly transferable to Conservation International’s work in the Asia-Pacific region.

“Asia-Pacific is immense in its scale, its human potential, its biodiversity — that’s why this region is critical to Conservation International’s mission to protect the nature that people need to thrive,” said Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International. “The stakes could not be higher, and Dr. Jeo brings the experience, entrepreneurial spirit and the strong record of conservation impact that we need to meet this challenge. I’m thrilled that he is joining our team.”

Dr. Jeo received a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the California Institute of Technology in 1998 and continues to maintain an active presence conducting research in conservation science. He will be based in Conservation International’s Asia-Pacific Division Office in Singapore.

For interviews, please contact Emmeline Johansen, Communications Director, Asia-Pacific and New Zealand Field Divisions, Conservation International, at ejohansen@conservation.org.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.  

Contact:

Emmeline Johansen
Communications Director – Asia-Pacific and New Zealand Field Divisions
Conservation International
ejohansen@conservation.org.

​Conservation International nomme Richard Jeo au poste de vice-président principal de la division de terrain Asie-Pacifique

Arlington, Virginie (9 janvier 2019) – Richard Jeo vient d’être nommé vice-président principal de la division de terrain Asie-Pacifique de Conservation International. Le Dr Jeo a de plus de 20 ans d’expérience dans le domaine de la conservation et de la science de la conservation à travers le monde.

Plus récemment, il a exercé les fonctions de directeur d’État pour The Nature Conservancy au Montana, où il a dirigé des programmes protégeant de manière permanente plus de 250 000 acres de terres privées d’une importance cruciale, facilitant ainsi la connectivité à grande échelle des écosystèmes de forêts, d’eau douce et de prairie. Au cours de sa longue carrière chez The Nature Conservancy, le Dr Jeo a joué un rôle de premier plan dans certains des plus importants accords de conservation jamais conclus, notamment les accords de 2009 relatifs à la forêt pluviale Great Bear conclus avec les Premières nations côtières du Canada, qui couvraient plus de 21 millions d’acres, et le projet Montana Legacy, représentant 500 millions USD, qui a transféré à la propriété publique plus de 310 000 acres de forêts.

Le Dr Jeo bénéficie d’une vaste expérience de la stratégie, de la gestion et de la philanthropie privée aux États-Unis, au Canada, au Kenya et en Namibie, et ses réalisations comprennent notamment la conception et le lancement en 2017 dans le Montana d’une campagne de capitalisation globale représentant 120 millions USD. Il a dirigé une grande variété de programmes de recherche scientifique portant sur divers sujets parmi lesquels les récifs coralliens et les écosystèmes insulaires tropicaux des Caraïbes, ou encore la réduction des conflits entre les guépards et les communautés locales en Namibie. Sa carrière a toujours produit des résultats significatifs en matière de conservation, et il sait travailler efficacement avec ses partenaires et veiller à ce que ces résultats soient maintenus grâce à des fonds importants réunis à des fins de conservation. Toutes les compétences qu’il apporte sont directement transférables aux travaux de Conservation International dans la région Asie-Pacifique.

« L’Asie-Pacifique est immense par son ampleur, son potentiel humain, et sa biodiversité – pour cette raison, cette région est essentielle à la mission de Conservation International, qui est de protéger la nature dont les personnes ont besoin pour prospérer », a déclaré le Dr M. Sanjayan, PDG de Conservation International. « Les enjeux ne pourraient pas être plus importants, et le Dr Jeo apporte l’expérience, l’esprit d’entreprise et de solides antécédents en matière d’impact sur la conservation dont nous avons besoin pour relever ce défi. Je suis ravi qu’il rejoigne notre équipe. »

Le Dr Jeo a obtenu un doctorat en neurosciences du California Institute of Technology en 1998 et continue de maintenir une présence active en menant des recherches sur la science de la conservation. Il sera basé au bureau de la division Asie-Pacifique de Conservation International à Singapour.

Pour des entretiens, veuillez contacter Emmeline Johansen, directrice des communications, Divisions de terrain Asie-Pacifique et Nouvelle-Zélande, Conservation International, à l’adresse ejohansen@conservation.org.

À propos de Conservation International
Conservation International utilise la science, les politiques et les partenariats pour protéger la nature dont les personnes tirent leur nourriture, leur eau potable et leur subsistance. Créée en 1987, Conservation International travaille dans plus de 30 pays sur six continents pour garantir à chacun une planète saine et prospère au service de tous. Pour en apprendre davantage sur Conservation International, la campagne révolutionnaire « La Nature parle » et sa série de projets de réalité virtuelle : « Mon Afrique », « Sous la canopée »et « Le récif de Valen », suivez le travail de Conservation International sur notre blog Human Nature, ainsi que sur Facebook, Twitter, Instagram et YouTube

Contact :

Emmeline Johansen
Directrice des communications – Divisions de terrain Asie-Pacifique et Nouvelle-Zélande
Conservation International
ejohansen@conservation.org

 

Conservation International Menunjuk Richard Jeo Sebagai Wakil Presiden Senior, Divisi Lapangan Asia-Pasifik

Arlington, Va. (9 Januari 2019) – Richard Jeo telah ditunjuk sebagai Wakil Presiden Senior Divisi Lapangan Asia-Pasifik Conservation International. Dr. Jeo telah memiliki pengalaman lebih dari 20 tahun di seluruh dunia dalam menangani pekerjaan konservasi maupun bidang keilmuannya.

Baru-baru ini, ia menjabat sebagai Direktur Negara Bagian untuk The Nature Conservancy di Montana, tempat ia memimpin program yang melindungi secara permanen lebih dari 250.000 ekar lahan pribadi yang sangat penting, memfasilitasi konektivitas skala besar di seluruh ekosistem hutan, air tawar, dan padang rumput. Selama kariernya yang panjang di The Nature Conservancy, Dr. Jeo berperan dalam berbagai tugas kepemimpinan di beberapa kesepakatan konservasi terbesar yang berhasil diselesaikan termasuk perjanjian Great Bear Rainforest Tahun 2009 dengan Coastal First Nations di Kanada yang mencakup lebih dari 21 juta ekar serta proyek Montana Legacy senilai $500 juta yang mengalihkan lebih dari 310.000 ekar hutan menjadi kepemilikan umum.

Dr. Jeo memiliki pengalaman luas dalam strategi, manajemen, dan filantropi swasta di Amerika Serikat, Kanada, Kenya, dan Namibia, termasuk desain dan peluncuran kampanye penggalangan dana menyeluruh senilai $120 juta pada tahun 2017 di Montana. Ia telah memimpin berbagai program penelitian ilmiah mulai dari terumbu karang dan ekosistem pulau tropis di Karibia hingga mengurangi konflik antara cheetah dengan komunitas lokal di Namibia. Kariernya secara konsisten membuahkan pelestarian alam berdampak besar, bekerja secara efektif dengan mitra, dan memastikan bahwa hasil itu dipertahankan melalui dana signifikan yang digalang untuk konservasi. Semua ini serta banyak keterampilan lainnya yang ia bawa langsung dapat dialihkan ke pekerjaan Conservation International di kawasan Asia-Pasifik.

“Asia-Pasifik memiliki skala, potensi manusia, serta keanekaragaman hayatinya yang teramat besar — itulah sebabnya kawasan ini sangat penting bagi misi Conservation International untuk melindungi alam yang dibutuhkan manusia untuk berkembang,” ungkap Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO Conservation International. “Taruhannya sangat tinggi, dan Dr. Jeo menghadirkan pengalaman, semangat wirausaha, dan rekam jejak kuat dalam dampak konservasi yang kita butuhkan untuk menghadapi tantangan ini. Saya senang ia bergabung dengan tim kami.”

Dr. Jeo menerima gelar Ph.D. di bidang Neurosains dari California Institute of Technology pada tahun 1998 dan terus aktif berkiprah dalam melakukan penelitian di bidang ilmu konservasi. Ia akan berkantor di Kantor Divisi Asia-Pasifik Conservation International di Singapura.

Untuk melakukan wawancara, silakan hubungi Emmeline Johansen, Direktur Komunikasi, Divisi Lapangan Asia-Pasifik dan Selandia Baru, Conservation International, di ejohansen@conservation.org.

Tentang Conservation International
Conservation International mendayagunakan ilmu pengetahuan, kebijakan, dan kemitraan untuk melindungi alam yang diandalkan manusia untuk mendapatkan makanan, air bersih, dan penghidupan. Didirikan pada tahun 1987, Conservation International bekerja di lebih dari 30 negara di enam benua untuk memastikan planet bumi ini sehat dan sejahtera sehingga dapat menyokong kita semua. Pelajari lebih lanjut tentang Conservation International, kampanye terobosan “Nature Is Speaking,” dan serangkaian proyek realitas mayanya: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy,” dan “Valen’s Reef.” Ikuti karya Conservation International di blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, dan YouTube Human Nature kami.  

Hubungi:

Emmeline Johansen
Direktur Komunikasi – Divisi Lapangan Asia-Pasifik dan Selandia Baru
Conservation International
ejohansen@conservation.org

 

Conservation Internationalはリチャード・ジェオをアジア太平洋地域フィールド部門のシニアバイスプレジデントに任命

バージニア州アーリントン(2019年1月9日)-Conservation Internationalはこのたび、リチャード・ジェオをアジア太平洋地域フィールド部門のシニアバイスプレジデントに任命しました。ジェオは20年以上にわたり世界中で自然環境保護の活動と研究に取り組んでいます。

最近ではジェオはモンタナ州のThe Nature Conservancyのディレクターを務め、森林、河川、草原の生態系の大規模なつながりを支えるために、25万エーカー以上の極めて重要な私有地を永久に保護するためのプログラムを指揮しました。長きにわたるThe Nature Conservancy在職中に、ジェオは自然環境保護に関する最も重要な案件の幾つかにおいて主導的役割を果たしました。そのような案件には例えば、カナダのCoastal First Nationsとの間で締結した2,100万エーカー以上の地域を対象とする2009年のグレートベア雨林契約や、31万エーカー以上の森林を公有地化した5億ドルのモンタナ・レガシー・プロジェクトなどがあります。

ジェオはアメリカ、カナダ、ケニア、ナミビアで戦略策定、管理業務、民間の社会奉仕活動にかかわった幅広い実績を持ちます。例えば、2017年にモンタナ州における1億2,000万ドルの包括的な資金調達キャンペーンの計画・実施を担当しました。また、カリブ海のサンゴ礁と熱帯の島の生態系保護や、ナミビアにおけるチーターと地域社会の共存に至るまで、さまざまな科学研究プログラムを指揮しました。これまでの活動で、パートナーとの効果的な共同作業を通じて自然環境保護において大きな成果を残しています。その成果は自然環境保護のために調達した膨大な資金を通じて維持されています。このようなすべての実績と多彩な能力は、Conservation Internationalのアジア太平洋地域での取り組みに直接生かせるものです。

Conservation International最高経営責任者のM. サンジャヤンは次のように述べています。「アジア太平洋地域はその規模、人的資源、生物多様性の観点から大きな可能性を秘めています。そのため、人間が発展を遂げるために必要な自然を守るというConservation Internationalのミッションにとって、同地域は非常に重要です。この重要な地域において、ジェオはこの課題に取り組む上で必要な経験と企業家精神をもたらし、これまでの自然保護活動の実績に基づいて活躍してくれると期待しています。彼をチームに迎えられたことを非常にうれしく思います」

ジェオは1998年にカリフォルニア工科大学で神経科学の博士号を取得後、自然保護研究に積極的に取り組み続けています。Conservation Internationalにおいては、シンガポールに所在のアジア太平洋地域オフィスに勤務します。

取材をご希望の場合は、Conservation Internationalのアジア太平洋地域およびニュージーランドのフィールド部門広報ディレクター、エメリン・ジョハンセン(Emmeline Johansen)まで電子メール(ejohansen@conservation.org)でお問い合わせください。

Conservation Internationalについて
Conservation Internationalは科学、政策、パートナーシップに基づいて、人間が食料、生活水、生活環境を得るために必要な自然を保護します。1987年設立のConservation Internationalは6大陸30カ国以上で活動を展開し、全人類にとって必要な健全で繁栄する地球を支えます。Conservation Internationalの詳細、および画期的なキャンペーンNature Is Speaking(自然は訴える)」、一連の仮想現実プロジェクト「マイ・アフリカ」「森の中で」「バレンの岩礁」の詳細をご覧ください。ブログFacebookTwitterInstagramYouTubeでもConservation Internationalの自然保護活動について発信しています。

連絡先:

エメリン・ジョハンセン
アジア太平洋地域・ニュージーランド、フィールド部門広報ディレクター
Conservation International
ejohansen@conservation.org

 

保护国际基金会任命 Richard Jeo 为亚太地区分部高级副总裁

弗吉尼亚州阿灵顿(2019 年 1 月 9 日)– Richard Jeo 博士被任命为保护国际基金会亚太地区分部高级副总裁。Jeo 博士曾在世界各地从事自然保护和自然保护科学方面的工作,拥有超过 20 年的从业经验。

他最近担任过蒙大拿州国家局长,领导开展了永久保护超过 250,000 英亩重要私有土地的项目,帮助促进森林、淡水和草原生态系统的大规模衔接。长期就职于自然保护局期间,Jeo 博士在一些史上最为成功的自然保护商谈中发挥了领导作用,包括与加拿大 Coastal First Nations 签订的”2009 年大熊雨林协议”,该协议覆盖了超过 2100 万英亩的森林;还有价值 5 亿美元的”蒙大拿遗产”项目,该项目将超过 310,000 英亩的森林转化为公有。

Jeo 博士在美国、加拿大、肯尼亚和纳米比亚从事战略、管理和私人慈善事业方面的工作时积累了丰富经验,其中包括 2017 年在蒙大拿设计和发起一项总额达 1.2 亿美元的综合性资金募集活动。他领导过多种多样的科学研究项目,从加勒比海域的珊瑚礁和热带岛屿生态系统,到在纳米比亚减少猎豹与当地社区之间的冲突。他在自己的职业生涯中不断取得具有突出影响的自然保护成果,能够与合作伙伴有效开展合作,并通过募集大量自然保护资金来确保这些成果得以延续。保护国际基金会在亚太地区的工作可以直接受益于他带来的所有这些能力和许多其他技能。
 
“亚太地区地域广阔,人口潜力巨大,生物多样性十分丰富 — 因此对于保护国际基金会保护人类赖以生存的大自然这一使命而言,该地区有着很重要的意义,”保护国际基金会的首席执行官 M. Sanjayan 博士说道,”任务会十分繁重,而 Jeo 博士带来的经验、企业家精神和他以往取得的出色成果所印证的能力,正是我们应对这一挑战所需要的。我很高兴他能加入我们的团队。”

Jeo 博士于 1998 年在加州理工学院获得了神经系统科学博士学位,并且一直活跃于自然保护科学研究领域。他将在设于新加坡的保护国际基金会亚太地区分部办公室工作。
如需访谈内容,请联系保护国际基金会亚太地区及新西兰分部传播总监 Emmeline Johansen,电子邮件地址为 ejohansen@conservation.org。

关于保护国际基金会
保护国际基金会凭借科学、策略方法与合作来保护人类赖以获得食物、淡水和生计的大自然。保护国际基金会成立于 1987 年,在全球 30 多个国家/地区开展工作,确保我们所有人赖以生存的这个星球健康繁荣。详细了解基金会、具有突破性意义的“Nature Is Speaking”(大自然在说话)活及其虚拟现实项目系列:“My Africa”(我的非洲)“Under the Canopy”(林之下)“Valen’s Reef”(瓦礁)。通过我们的 Human Nature 博客FacebookTwitterInstagramYouTube 关注保护国际基金会的工作。  

联系人:

Emmeline Johansen
传播总监 – 亚太地区及新西兰分部
保护国际基金会
ejohansen@conservation.org

​They Join 10 Additional New Partners in Growing Industry-Wide Effort to Make Coffee SustainableArlington, Va. (December 19, 2018) – The Sustainable Coffee Challenge today announced that 14 new partners including…
They Join 10 Additional New Partners in Growing Industry-Wide Effort to Make Coffee Sustainable

Arlington, Va. (December 19, 2018) – The Sustainable Coffee Challenge today announced that 14 new partners including Dunkin’, Nescafé, Mercon Group, and Neumann Kaffee Gruppe have joined its mission to help make coffee the world’s first fully sustainable agricultural project, joining over 100 partners including corporations, governments, NGOs and research organizations.

Additional new partners include: British Coffee Association, Catholic Relief Services, Cafinco, Swiss Coffee Alliance, Gorilla Conservation Coffee, Eko Café Etico, San Martin Regional Government, Peru; Castellon Coffee Group, Cafexport and Oikocredit.

“It’s great to have these partners join the Sustainable Coffee Challenge and commit to work collaboratively to make coffee the world’s first sustainable agricultural product,” said Bambi Semroc, Vice President, Sustainable Markets & Strategy for the Center for Environmental Leadership in Business. “We are encouraged by their commitments and investments and look forward to working together to scale these across the sector.”

The Sustainable Coffee Challenge, conceived by Conservation International and Starbucks and launched during the Paris climate meetings in 2015, is uniting players from across the coffee industry – growers, traders, roasters, retailers, governments and NGOs. It works to stimulate greater demand for sustainable coffee while forming partnerships  to find and scale up programs promoting improved livelihoods, nature conservation and a continued supply of coffee.

The Sustainable Coffee Challenge engages in collaborative efforts with its partners across four networks to achieve its mission: scaling up sustainable sourcing; farm renovation and rehabilitation; improved labor practices and supply and mapping and monitoring of coffee and forests.

To join as a partner, contact Valerie Beard, Manager, Sustainable Coffee Challenge at vbeard@conservation.org.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy”and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

About the Sustainable Coffee Challenge
The Sustainable Coffee Challenge convenes, unites and urges the coffee sector and conservation partners across the industry to spur the actions and investments necessary to make coffee the first sustainable agriculture product in the world. The Challenge is committed to stimulating demand for sustainable coffee across the value chain, from the policymaking level to the final consumer. By encouraging demand for sustainable coffee, it leads to investments that enable the transition to a sustainable production and ensuring the coffee we drink is a sustainable product.
​ 

​Survey of 1,630 Corporate Disclosures to Investors Finds Only 21 Percent Disclosed Financial Risks From Climate Change​​Arlington, Va. (December 10, 2018) – A new study published today in Nature Climate…
​Survey of 1,630 Corporate Disclosures to Investors Finds Only 21 Percent Disclosed Financial Risks From Climate Change​​

Arlington, Va. (December 10, 2018) – A new study published today in Nature Climate Change analyzing the climate risk disclosures of 1,630 companies found that many companies are failing to accurately characterize their climate change risk or adequately prepare for its physical impacts. 

The study, by Conservation International scientists Allie Goldstein, David Hole and Will Turner, and CDP Senior Manager Jillian Gladstone, was based on responses to CDP’s annual climate change questionnaire, which asks companies to report on climate risk management strategies.  

The study also analyzed the companies’ stated adaptation strategies – making it the largest private sector adaptation study to date – and found that despite evidence that climate change will have wide-ranging impacts for businesses, most companies have focused their adaptation strategies on a small set of impacts to direct operations, not taking into account supply chain, customer, employee, and wider societal impacts. 

The study comes out as global climate leaders gather in Poland for COP 24, the annual United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations, and on the heels of the most recent IPCC report, which warned the impacts and costs of climate change will be far greater than expected. 

The study’s findings and recommendations include:​​
  1. While 83 percent of the companies surveyed disclosed that they faced physical risks from climate change, only 21 percent quantified these risks in financial terms.
  2. As a result, the 1,630 companies, representing 69 percent of global market capitalization, are collectively underreporting climate risks to investors by at least 100 times.
  3. The paper finds that while many companies are trying to incorporate climate change into their risk management practices, five key ‘blind spots’ are preventing businesses from adequately preparing for its impacts.
  4. To address risks beyond direct operations and across larger geographic areas, the authors recommend that companies give greater consideration to ecosystem-based adaptation strategies such as sustainable agriculture, watershed protection, and reforestation.
  5. Finally, the paper recommends that companies adopt the 2017 Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) recommendations which urge companies to report on the financial implications of climate change to business.​

“The mismatch we’re seeing here between what climate science tells us to expect and what companies are preparing for shows that there is clearly a large and underappreciated climate risk embedded in companies’ strategies and assets,” said Will Turner, Senior Vice President, Global Strategies, Conservation International. 
“Many companies are trying to factor climate change into their risk management practices, but we see significant blind spots – meaning they may be doing too little, too late to prepare for these risks,” said Allie Goldstein, Scientist at Conservation International. “We urge companies to consider nature and its services, which contribute US$125-145 trillion to the economy annually. Nature is the biggest asset manager of all, and the largest untapped resource for building resilience to climate change impacts.”

“This new research shows that while many companies are already investing in robust climate adaptation strategies, others have struggled with gaps in their awareness of climate risks – leaving them potentially unable to prepare for a low-carbon future and take advantage of opportunities. To remedy this, in 2018 CDP has aligned its reporting with the TCFD recommendations, meaning that companies can more clearly communicate their risks and management approaches to their investors and customers,” said Jillian Gladstone, Senior Manager, CDP.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

About CDP
CDP is an international non-profit that drives companies and governments to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, safeguard water resources and protect forests. Voted number one climate research provider by investors and working with institutional investors with assets of US$87 trillion, we leverage investor and buyer power to motivate companies to disclose and manage their environmental impacts. CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is a founding member of the We Mean Business Coalition. Please visit www.cdp.net or follow us @CDP to find out more.

Katowice, Poland (December 10, 2018) – The following statement was released today by Shyla Raghav, Conservation International Climate Lead:"The decision today by the U.S, Saudi Arabia, Russia and Kuwait to…
Katowice, Poland (December 10, 2018) – The following statement was released today by Shyla Raghav, Conservation International Climate Lead:

“The decision today by the U.S, Saudi Arabia, Russia and Kuwait to reject the IPCC report is disappointing and only further sets us back from a constructive dialogue on climate change. The science is clear – to avoid catastrophic effects of climate change, we need to act fast. This week, almost 200 countries are gathered in Poland at the UN climate negotiations to strengthen political will and action on mitigating the causes of climate change and adapting to its impacts. The IPCC report lays out the most urgent call to climate action we’ve had to date. We have one week left at the climate talks. It is imperative that these countries acknowledge the science and step up their leadership in the global climate arena.”​

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube