​Survey of 1,630 Corporate Disclosures to Investors Finds Only 21 Percent Disclosed Financial Risks From Climate Change​​Arlington, Va. (December 10, 2018) – A new study published today in Nature Climate…
​Survey of 1,630 Corporate Disclosures to Investors Finds Only 21 Percent Disclosed Financial Risks From Climate Change​​

Arlington, Va. (December 10, 2018) – A new study published today in Nature Climate Change analyzing the climate risk disclosures of 1,630 companies found that many companies are failing to accurately characterize their climate change risk or adequately prepare for its physical impacts. 

The study, by Conservation International scientists Allie Goldstein, David Hole and Will Turner, and CDP Senior Manager Jillian Gladstone, was based on responses to CDP’s annual climate change questionnaire, which asks companies to report on climate risk management strategies.  

The study also analyzed the companies’ stated adaptation strategies – making it the largest private sector adaptation study to date – and found that despite evidence that climate change will have wide-ranging impacts for businesses, most companies have focused their adaptation strategies on a small set of impacts to direct operations, not taking into account supply chain, customer, employee, and wider societal impacts. 

The study comes out as global climate leaders gather in Poland for COP 24, the annual United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations, and on the heels of the most recent IPCC report, which warned the impacts and costs of climate change will be far greater than expected. 

The study’s findings and recommendations include:​​
  1. While 83 percent of the companies surveyed disclosed that they faced physical risks from climate change, only 21 percent quantified these risks in financial terms.
  2. As a result, the 1,630 companies, representing 69 percent of global market capitalization, are collectively underreporting climate risks to investors by at least 100 times.
  3. The paper finds that while many companies are trying to incorporate climate change into their risk management practices, five key ‘blind spots’ are preventing businesses from adequately preparing for its impacts.
  4. To address risks beyond direct operations and across larger geographic areas, the authors recommend that companies give greater consideration to ecosystem-based adaptation strategies such as sustainable agriculture, watershed protection, and reforestation.
  5. Finally, the paper recommends that companies adopt the 2017 Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) recommendations which urge companies to report on the financial implications of climate change to business.​

“The mismatch we’re seeing here between what climate science tells us to expect and what companies are preparing for shows that there is clearly a large and underappreciated climate risk embedded in companies’ strategies and assets,” said Will Turner, Senior Vice President, Global Strategies, Conservation International. 
“Many companies are trying to factor climate change into their risk management practices, but we see significant blind spots – meaning they may be doing too little, too late to prepare for these risks,” said Allie Goldstein, Scientist at Conservation International. “We urge companies to consider nature and its services, which contribute US$125-145 trillion to the economy annually. Nature is the biggest asset manager of all, and the largest untapped resource for building resilience to climate change impacts.”

“This new research shows that while many companies are already investing in robust climate adaptation strategies, others have struggled with gaps in their awareness of climate risks – leaving them potentially unable to prepare for a low-carbon future and take advantage of opportunities. To remedy this, in 2018 CDP has aligned its reporting with the TCFD recommendations, meaning that companies can more clearly communicate their risks and management approaches to their investors and customers,” said Jillian Gladstone, Senior Manager, CDP.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

About CDP
CDP is an international non-profit that drives companies and governments to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, safeguard water resources and protect forests. Voted number one climate research provider by investors and working with institutional investors with assets of US$87 trillion, we leverage investor and buyer power to motivate companies to disclose and manage their environmental impacts. CDP, formerly Carbon Disclosure Project, is a founding member of the We Mean Business Coalition. Please visit www.cdp.net or follow us @CDP to find out more.

Katowice, Poland (December 10, 2018) – The following statement was released today by Shyla Raghav, Conservation International Climate Lead:"The decision today by the U.S, Saudi Arabia, Russia and Kuwait to…
Katowice, Poland (December 10, 2018) – The following statement was released today by Shyla Raghav, Conservation International Climate Lead:

“The decision today by the U.S, Saudi Arabia, Russia and Kuwait to reject the IPCC report is disappointing and only further sets us back from a constructive dialogue on climate change. The science is clear – to avoid catastrophic effects of climate change, we need to act fast. This week, almost 200 countries are gathered in Poland at the UN climate negotiations to strengthen political will and action on mitigating the causes of climate change and adapting to its impacts. The IPCC report lays out the most urgent call to climate action we’ve had to date. We have one week left at the climate talks. It is imperative that these countries acknowledge the science and step up their leadership in the global climate arena.”​

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube

​Arlington, Va. (December 5, 2018) – Today the Ocean Health Index (OHI) released its seventh assessment of global ocean health. Like the previous two years, the 2018 average score for…
​Arlington, Va. (December 5, 2018) – Today the Ocean Health Index (OHI) released its seventh assessment of global ocean health. Like the previous two years, the 2018 average score for our oceans was 70 out of 100. This highlights that ocean health is remaining relatively stable, but improvements are still needed to achieve a sustainable future.

The Ocean Health Index is a tool developed by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International to evaluate the benefits people derive from the ocean. As the first and only existing ocean assessment tool to scientifically compare and combine key elements from all dimensions of the ocean’s health – biological, physical, economic, and social – OHI equips managers and policymakers with meaningful vital signs that can help them manage oceans sustainably.

“An annual, comprehensive diagnostic for the world’s oceans provides decision makers with information and knowledge they can use to implement effective actions for improved sustainable ocean management,” noted Dr. Ben Halpern, lead scientist for OHI, Director of NCEAS, and Professor at the Bren School at University of California Santa Barbara. “With seven years of OHI data, we are gaining deeper insights into how healthy our oceans are through time and space.”

By conducting annual assessments, OHI provides a comprehensive view of how well the marine system and the people who depend on it are faring and changing through time. Last year, nearly two-thirds of the assessed countries were experiencing decreases in ocean health, but in 2018 these numbers leveled out and 109 countries are experiencing increases with 111 experiencing decreases.

Among the highest scoring, at 80 or above, were island nations, such as Aruba in the Caribbean and New Caledonia in the south Pacific, or uninhabited islands. Germany was the only one of these 17 high scorers with a population that exceeds one million people. On the other end of the spectrum, 10 regions scored 50 or below, including seven African, one Central American, and two Middle Eastern nations.

The data that powers the Ocean Health Index, like the ocean itself, is dynamic. OHI benefits from constant evaluation and improvement aimed at incorporating new knowledge, data and understanding, and capturing what is important to people for healthy oceans. Therefore, underlying methods or data for some goals have been upgraded.

As a living index built on open data science practices, OHI is flexible in receiving these new data, continuing to build a robust evaluation of ocean health. For 2018, the Mariculture sub-goal was updated to include seaweed once it was identified that most seaweed production is for human consumption. The seaweed industry’s contribution to food is valued at $5 billion and its demand is continuing to increase worldwide.

Adding these seaweeds to the Mariculture sub-goal and removing them from the Natural Products goal creates a more complete picture of seaweed’s contribution globally, and even increased scores in Japan, North Korea, and South Korea. For further exploration of this year’s scores, read the summary of findings, visit our website, or explore our StoryMap.

2018 also marked the expansion of the OHI community, with the inaugural cohort of OHI Fellows and independent assessments completed in Hawaii, Samoa, Bali, Kenya, Tanzania, and the Arctic.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About the Ocean Health Index
The Ocean Health Index scores, calculated every year since 2012, provide a measure of how well 220 countries and territories are sustainably managing our ocean resources. By providing an annual comprehensive database baseline for global ocean health, OHI offers all coastal countries, at any level of capacity, a starting place for assessing the status of their marine resources and environments and utilizing an ecosystem-based approach toward management. ​

Arlington, Va. (December 5, 2018) – Today, Conservation International received a grant from PeaceNexus, a Switzerland-based foundation dedicated to preventing conflict and building peace worldwide. It is the first grant…
Arlington, Va. (December 5, 2018) – Today, Conservation International received a grant from PeaceNexus, a Switzerland-based foundation dedicated to preventing conflict and building peace worldwide. It is the first grant the foundation has awarded an environmental organization and will help further Conservation International’s efforts to link biodiversity conservation and conflict prevention.

PeaceNexus and Conservation International will partner to develop a natural resource management approach that integrates conflict prevention approaches with conservation efforts. Together, they will conduct an organizational assessment of existing capacity and leadership in conflict-sensitive conservation. Following the assessment, Conservation International will develop a three-to-five year action plan to scale and enhance efforts to building peace and preventing conflict in countries including Colombia, Ecuador, Liberia and Peru.

“Forty percent of conflicts within countries and between countries are linked to natural resources. Addressing the roots of conflict helps us and our partners develop better communication, more effective programming and long-term sustainability of our conservation efforts,” said Kristen Walker Painemilla, Senior Vice President, Conservation International Center for Communities and Conservation. “We strongly believe that the adoption of this approach will help to ensure more successful conservation outcomes and impact across our global programs.”

Catriona Gourlay, Executive Director of PeaceNexus said, “Given the stress placed on natural resources, conflict around their management is likely to increase. Working with communities and other stakeholders, Conservation International is well placed to help prevent and mitigate conflict as part of an integrated approach to responsible natural resource management. PeaceNexus is eager to work in partnership with Conservation International to embed a conflict sensitive approach in its operations.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube

​Arlington, Va. (December 3, 2018) – "Dulce," a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, has been selected to the Documentary Short section of the Sundance Institute's 2019 Sundance Film…
​Arlington, Va. (December 3, 2018) – “Dulce,” a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, has been selected to the Documentary Short section of the Sundance Institute’s 2019 Sundance Film Festival. It will run from January 24 – February 3, 2019 in Park City, Utah. Tickets are available here.

In June, “Dulce” premiered at the Palm Springs International ShortFest where it won Best Documentary Short. At the Toronto International Film Festival in August, the short documentary film was selected to screen. It is currently featured on The New York Times Op-Docs channel.

Filmed in La Ensenada on the Pacific coast of Colombia, the film follows a young girl, Dulce, whose small fishing community is struggling with the effects of climate change on their lives. In Dulce’s community, climate change means higher tides from rising sea levels. 

“Dulce” was co-directed by Guille Isa and Angello Faccini and produced by filmmakers Jungles in Paris. It was executive produced by actor and activist Lee Pace, and Margarita Mora and Anastasia Khoo on behalf of Conservation International. 

As the film opens, Dulce is being taught to swim by her mother, Betty. For this community, swimming is survival: It is a skill Dulce needs to carry on her family’s livelihood harvesting piangua, a type of clam, from nearby mangroves. Meanwhile, rising tides have wiped out entire villages in recent years near La Ensenada, heightening Betty’s urgency to help Dulce master this skill. 

“The decision to tell this story through the eyes of a mother and daughter was deliberate. Across the globe, women are on the front lines of climate change. The urgency we feel as Betty struggles to teach her daughter to swim reminds us that that women are more likely than men to feel the impacts of climate change, especially in the developing world,” said Anastasia Khoo, Conservation International’s Chief Marketing Officer. “Increasingly, they are also the ones rising to the challenge to speak up and force change.”

In the tradition of Conservation International’s other films (“Nature is Speaking,” “Valen’s Reef,” “Under the Canopy” and the recently released “My Africa”), “Dulce” puts a human face on the quest for environmental protection. 

For Conservation International, it is an effective strategy. Viewers of “Under the Canopy” responded by helping the organization, with the backing of SC Johnson, to protect 10,000 acres of rainforest in record time. 

Jungles in Paris, cofounded by Oliver and Darrell Hartman in 2013, also has been recognized for its environmental-themed films. The mission-driven media company focuses on subjects of nature and culture, having produced short documentaries featured at festivals such as Hot Docs, Atlanta and Big Sky. 

Co-directors Isa and Faccini have also seen their work presented in numerous international film festivals. Isa’s films have appeared at Barcelona, Amsterdam, Riverrun, Sidewalk and more. Faccini has among his film credits Lina (2016), a winner of a Young Director’s Award at Cannes and Best Direction Award at the Malaga Film Festival. 

Assets for media use:

Social media: https://www.facebook.com/DulceDoc/

Images: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Wj-qv4mnUkBmiEaisPWC2hLTH-3tkaA0      

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy”and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

About Jungles in Paris 
Jungles in Paris, founded in 2013 and based in New York City, tells stories about nature and culture. We use a range of media to explore planet Earth in all its multi-colored diversity, with a special focus on roots and place. Spotlighting craft, culture, geography and wildlife, we aim to celebrate subjects — human and non-human alike — that are often at risk of extinction in a globalized, growth-driven 21st century. We prioritize the local, the endemic, the time-honored, and the meaningful. Rather than pure advocacy, we practice purpose-driven media. We aim in our work to restore a sense of enchantment 
around the things that matter, employing creative nonfiction methods to propose a more enlightened way of engaging with the ecosystems and cultural possibilities around us.

About Sundance Institute
Founded in 1981 by Robert Redford, Sundance Institute is a nonprofit organization that provides and preserves the space for artists in film, theatre, and new media to create and thrive. The Institute’s signature Labs, granting, and mentorship programs, dedicated to developing new work, take place throughout the year in the U.S. and internationally. The Sundance Film Festival and other public programs connect audiences to artists in igniting new ideas, discovering original voices, and building a community dedicated to independent storytelling. Sundance Institute has supported such projects as Mudbound, Get Out, The Big Sick, Strong Island, Blackfish, Top of the Lake, Winter’s Bone, The Wolfpack, Dear White People, Brooklyn, Little Miss Sunshine, 20 Feet From Stardom, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fruitvale Station, Spring Awakening, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder and Fun Home.

Katowice, Poland (December 3, 2018) – Conservation International joins leaders across the climate movement at COP 24, the annual United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations, in Katowice, Poland,…

Katowice, Poland (December 3, 2018) – Conservation International joins leaders across the climate movement at COP 24, the annual United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations, in Katowice, Poland, December 2 – 14. Nearly 200 participating nations will convene to push forward the implementation of the Paris Agreement.

During the negotiations, Conservation International will call on countries to incorporate natural climate solutions into national policy decisions, agree on strong rules for emissions trading, incorporate the traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples in climate decisions and actions, and agree on increased ambition of their national climate commitments by 2020.

Natural climate solutions are critical to achieving the Paris Agreement goals. Protecting, sustainably managing, and restoring forests and natural ecosystems are a crucial part of the solution to climate change, providing at least 30 percent of the mitigation needed to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

“This year’s COP comes on the heels of the IPCC special report that outlines the scientific urgency of accelerating climate action. Our decisions today will have an incredible influence on our planet for decades to come. Never before have we been at such a critical political moment to turn science into action and more robust commitments,” said Shyla Raghav, Conservation International Climate Lead.

“We must fully prioritize the role of nature to achieve the Paris Agreement. It is imperative that COP 24 delivers a strong rulebook that provides sufficient clarity to countries and other actors to ramp up their climate actions in the lead up to 2020,” said Maggie Comstock, Conservation International Senior Director of Climate Policy.

Conservation International will highlight its work with indigenous peoples at an official side event on the role of indigenous peoples in implementing natural climate solutions. Conservation International will also collaborate with countries and non-state actors to elevate the role of protecting forests, oceans and other ecosystems as part of the solution to mitigating climate change.

To request media interviews, please contact Salma Bahramy at: sbahramy@conservation.org.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube

​MEDIA ADVISORYConservation International to Honor Vice President Joe Biden and Juan Manuel Santos, Former President of Colombia, With Global Visionary Award at Gala Dinner, December 6 in New York-----Byron D. Trott, Founder, Chairman and…
​MEDIA ADVISORY

Conservation International to Honor Vice President Joe Biden 
and Juan Manuel Santos, Former President of Colombia, With Global Visionary 
Award at Gala Dinner, December 6 in New York
—–
Byron D. Trott, Founder, Chairman and CEO of BDT & Company to Receive Founders’ Award
WHAT: On Thursday, December 6th, at its annual New York gala dinner, Conservation International will honor Joseph R. Biden, Jr., the 47th Vice President of the United States, and Juan Manuel Santos, the former President of Colombia and 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, with the Global Visionary Award. Byron D. Trott, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BDT & Company, will receive the Conservation International’s Founders’ Award.
The dinner will be hosted by Lauren and Andres Santo Domingo at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York.
WHO: 
Honorees and Speakers in Order of Appearance:
Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO, Conservation International
Shailene Woodley, Actress and Conservation Advocate
Joseph R. Biden, Jr. , 47th Vice President of the United States
Peter Seligmann, Co-Founder and Chairman, Conservation International
Byron D. Trott, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BDT & Company
Jennifer Morris, President, Conservation International
Lee Pace, Actor and Conservation Advocate
Andrés Santo Domingo, Gala Host and Co-Chair
Juan Manuel Santos, former President of Colombia and 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate
WHERE: Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 10 Columbus Circle, New York, NY
WHEN: Thursday, December 6th
5:30 p.m. Press Call Time
6:30 p.m. Guests arrive
6:30 p.m. Cocktail
7:30 p.m. Dinner, Evening Program begins 
Press coverage is invited but press must RSVP in advance by contacting Jenny Parker at 917-763-3263 or jparker@conservation.org.
About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. ​

​MEDIA ADVISORYConservation International to Honor 47th United States Vice President Joe Biden and ​Juan Manuel Santos, Former President of Colombia, With Global Visionary Award at Annual Gala Dinner, December 6 in New York-----​Byron…
MEDIA ADVISORY

Conservation International to Honor 47th United States Vice President Joe Biden 
and ​Juan Manuel Santos, Former President of Colombia, With Global Visionary Award at Annual Gala Dinner, December 6 in New York
—–
​Byron D. Trott, Founder, Chairman and CEO of BDT & Company to Receive Founders’ Award

WHAT: On Thursday, December 6, at its annual New York gala dinner, Conservation International will honor Joseph R. Biden, Jr., the 47th Vice President of the United States, and Juan Manuel Santos, the former President of Colombia and 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, with the Global Visionary Award. Byron D. Trott, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BDT & Company, will receive the Conservation International’s Founders’ Award.

The dinner will be hosted by Lauren and Andres Santo Domingo at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York.

 
WHO:
Honorees and Speakers in Order of Appearance:

Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO, Conservation International

Shailene Woodley, Actress and Conservation Advocate

Joseph R. Biden, Jr., 47th United States Vice President

Peter Seligmann, Co-Founder and Chairman, Conservation International

Byron D. Trott, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BDT & Company

Jennifer Morris, President, Conservation International

Lee Pace, Actor and Conservation Advocate

Andrés Santo Domingo, Gala Host and Co-Chair

Juan Manuel Santos, former President of Colombia and 2016 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate

WHERE: Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center, 10 Columbus Circle, New York, NY

WHEN: Thursday 6:30 pm

5:30 p.m.          Press Call Time

6:30 p.m.          Guests arrive

6:30 p.m.          Cocktail

7:30 p.m.          Dinner, Evening Program begins

Press coverage is invited but press must RSVP in advance by contacting Jenny Parker at 917-763-3263 or jparker@conservation.org.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. ​

​Honolulu, HI (November 26, 2018) – A new aquaculture management guide, Best Practices for Aquaculture Management: guidance for implementing the ecosystem approach in Indonesia and beyond, from Conservation International, Sustainable…
​Honolulu, HI (November 26, 2018) – A new aquaculture management guide, Best Practices for Aquaculture Management: guidance for implementing the ecosystem approach in Indonesia and beyond, from Conservation International, Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP), and the University of California Santa Barbara’s Sustainable Fisheries Group, provides guidance on best practices for seafood farmers seeking the most environmentally sustainable operations.

The guide makes actionable a set of best practices in zonal aquaculture management as suggested in the Food and Agriculture Organization’s Ecosystem Approach to Aquaculture: 1) spatial planning and zoning, 2) waterbody carrying capacity limits, and 3) aquaculture disease management areas. The guidance applies to seafood farming worldwide and uses Indonesia as a case study for implementation.

“Typically, aquaculture development and management have largely focused on siting, licensing and monitoring at the farm level,” the guide’s authors wrote in an executive summary. “This perspective fails to acknowledge that aquaculture industries are dependent on public resources (namely water and space) and are tightly coupled to the surrounding ecosystems in which they operate. Even if a farm is operating at the highest level of performance, it is at risk if neighboring farms or industries have poor environmental practices.”

Other actionable recommendations from the guide apply for both industry and government institutions that set policies in areas where seafood farms operate such as in Indonesia where the guide has been well received. Supply chain stakeholders are encouraged to work more closely with farmers and governments to initiate and support coordinated management practices to reduce environmental impacts and disease risks.

“SFP has been promoting a zonal approach to aquaculture for more than five years,” said Anton Immink, SFP’s Aquaculture Director. “This guide is a new way of not only sharing the importance of zonal management, but also providing clear, actionable recommendations for implementation.”

Dean of the Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences of Padjajaran University Yudi Nurul Ihsan, Ph.D said “this guide could be used as a model for fisheries development in the future.” Yudhi, who was also involved in preparing this guide, said, “Aquaculture will save Indonesia’s national economy as well as the local economy because it absorbs labor, alleviates poverty and supports Indonesia’s food security.”

Conservation International, SFP, and partners are now working to pilot the implementation of these best practices in the shrimp aquaculture industry in Indonesia. The pilot project is expected to help the industry produce more seafood, with fewer disease losses and negative environmental impacts.

About The Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Foundation:
Founded in 2006, the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Foundation – known as Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP) – is a nonprofit organization dedicated to rebuilding depleted fish stocks and reducing
the environmental and social impacts of fishing and fish farming through engaging fishery stakeholders (communities, NGOs, government, etc.) and seafood businesses in every part of the supply chain. The organization works to improve fisheries through fishery improvement projects (FIPs) and aquaculture improvement projects (AIPs), which are multi-stakeholder bodies that seek to advance the sustainability of fishing and fish farming operations. SFP also supports Supply Chain Roundtables which allow seafood suppliers to work in a pre-competitive environment to promote improvement throughout the supply chain. Visit us at www.sustainablefish.org.

About Conservation International:
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About The Sustainable Fisheries Group:
The Sustainable Fisheries Group (SFG), founded in 2006, is a research team that is run collaboratively between the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management and the Marine Science Institute at the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB). The mission of SFG is to provide leadership to develop new science and transform it into solutions for sustainable oceans. Since its inception, SFG has leveraged the strengths of the Bren School, drawing upon student and faculty talent. To learn more about this project and others, please click here.​

​Just one day following the EU`s historic announcement to begin phasing out single use plastics, the idyllic Caribbean city of Santa Marta, Colombia announced an ambitious plan to eliminate plastic…
Just one day following the EU`s historic announcement to begin phasing out single use plastics, the idyllic Caribbean city of Santa Marta, Colombia announced an ambitious plan to eliminate plastic and styrofoam by 2025.

Santa Marta, Colombia (October 29, 2018) — On a Caribbean beach at the foot of the world’s tallest coastal mountain, Santa Marta´s mayor Rafael Martinez launched a campaign to De-plastify the city before its 500 year anniversary in 2025. The campaign seeks to phase out single-use plastic and styrofoam. Santa Marta is the first city in Colombia to make such a pledge.  

Conservation International participated in the historic event along with a star studded cast of characters, including the Colombian rock band Aterciopelados. Conservation International has been working in Colombia since 1991.

The campaign to phase out single-use plastics and styrofoam is rooted in a municipal decree, jointly signed by Mayor Martinez and the head of the municipal environmental authority (DADSA) Carmen Caicedo. The program´s implementation involves a staged rollout, beginning with a four month socialization period, followed by increasingly severe sanctions ranging from community service to fines. Prior to announcing the campaign, several hundred citizens participated in a cleanup effort to remove plastics, styrofoam and other garbage from playa Los Cocos and the Manzanares River.

¨Santa Marta and  the Caribbean are home to irreplaceable biodiversity and a growing human population,” said Fabio Arjona, Director of Conservation International Colombia. “Conservation and sustainable tourism are interdependent and today’s announcement to begin phasing out plastics is a huge step for Santa Marta and Colombia.”

In addition to its history of coastal-marine work in the region, Conservation International is conducting a sustainable tourism pilot project in nearby Minca with the goal of improving management of the Gaira river watershed in the face of increasing pressure from tourism and development. The project is part of a partnership with Tras la Perla, the foundation led by Colombian icon and music star Carlos Vives and his wife Claudia Elena Vazquez. Prior to the launch of the plastics campaign, Conservation International staff and other partners helped draw attention to the plight of ocean plastics, hosting the Plastic Ocean Foundation and award winning journalist and filmmaker Craig Leeson on a tour to present the film Plastic Oceans to students in Santa Marta and visit indigenous Arhuaco and Wayú communities. 

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube