​Arlington, Va. (October 4, 2018) – Conservation International today ​released "Forest," the newest film in its award-winning "Nature Is Speaking" series. Voiced by Emmy-award nominee and environmental activist Shailene Woodley,…
​Arlington, Va. (October 4, 2018) – Conservation International today ​released “Forest,” the newest film in its award-winning “Nature Is Speaking” series. Voiced by Emmy-award nominee and environmental activist Shailene Woodley, the film highlights the importance of forests — from temperate to tropical, redwood to mangrove — in fighting climate change.

“Saving forests is the only way to save ourselves. From the air we breathe, to water, medicine and other resources they provide, forests sustain lives. But our forests are disappearing. To ensure humanity survives, we have to stop cutting them down. We have to let forests grow,” said Woodley.       

The world has lost nearly half of its forests due to agriculture, development or resource extraction. Yet the value of the benefits that standing forests provide is immense.

  • Tropical forests account for at least 30 percent of the global mitigation action needed to halt climate change.
  • Nearly 1.6 billion people (about 25 percent of the world’s population) rely on forest resources such as food, medicine and fuel wood for their livelihoods.
  • Mangrove forests are one of the last lines of defense against climate change. They help people weather the impacts of climate change and mitigate its causes by absorbing and storing carbon dioxide that would otherwise warm the atmosphere. Mangroves can absorb as much as 10 times the carbon of a similarly sized area of terrestrial forest.

Conservation International strives to protect tropical forests around the world, working directly with the communities who live in, and depend on, these forests. To learn more about Conservation International’s work with forests, click here.

Conservation International developed the “Nature Is Speaking” campaign in 2014 with social impact communications agency, MAL\FOR GOOD, under the creative direction of agency founder, Lee Clow. The goal:  To give nature a voice and reframe why conservation is important, reinforcing that people need nature if we are to safeguard our future on the planet. The series includes films personifying different elements of nature narrated by some of the biggest names in Hollywood including Harrison Ford, Julia Roberts, Liam Neeson, Lupita Nyong’o, Edward Norton, Robert Redford, Penelope Cruz, Ian Somerhalder, Reese Witherspoon, Salma Hayek and Lee Pace as well as more than 50 international artists. The films have been viewed more than 100 million times across 40 countries in 10 languages.

“Forest” is available to view here.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

​Arlington, Va. (October 2, 2018) - The following statement was released today by Jennifer Morris, President, Conservation International: "Conservation International applauds the House introduction of legislation to reauthorize the Tropical…
​Arlington, Va. (October 2, 2018) – The following statement was released today by Jennifer Morris, President, Conservation International:

“Conservation International applauds the House introduction of legislation to reauthorize the Tropical Forest Conservation Act. This important conservation legislation serves to help facilitate ‘debt-for-nature swaps’ and is among the U.S. Government’s most innovative and effective economic tools for supporting critical conservation initiatives that sustain ecosystems, livelihoods and species.

I thank Representative Steve Chabot, along with Representatives Engle, Fortenberry, Grijalva, McCollum, Sherman, and Smith for their leadership and commitment to saving wildlife and wild places by supporting the Tropical Forest Conservation Reauthorization Act.”

​The Tropical Forest Conservation Reauthorization Act (TFCA) would reauthorize a highly successful debt-for-nature program that has saved more than 67 million acres of tropical forests by allowing developing countries that meet certain criteria to be relieved of debt owed to the United States in exchange for their conservation efforts. The reauthorization would significantly expand these efforts to conserve coral reef ecosystems.

To date, the TFCA program has sequestered approximately 56 million metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is the equivalent of taking 11.8 million cars off the road. There is a direct connection between resource scarcity, international conservation and America’s economic and national security interests. Targeted U.S. investment in international conservation efforts, through the TFCA, contributes to America’s long-term foreign policy objectives and enhances U.S. economic and national security interests around the globe.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

​Arlington, Va. (September 27, 2018) – In Latin America, 50 percent of cloud forests – tropical rainforests that form along high-altitude mountainsides regularly immersed in low-lying cloud cover – lie…
​Arlington, Va. (September 27, 2018) – In Latin America, 50 percent of cloud forests – tropical rainforests that form along high-altitude mountainsides regularly immersed in low-lying cloud cover – lie within hydropower watersheds. These vital and uniquely biodiverse forests help to increase volume and flow regularity to hydropower reservoirs, reduce soil erosion and subsequent sediment inflows, and ultimately strengthen energy security.

To date, however, nearly 50 percent of cloud forests have been lost across Latin America, primarily due to land conversion for agriculture and cattle grazing.

A cutting-edge impact investment instrument developed by Conservation International and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) aims to restore and conserve degraded cloud forests while increasing hydropower profitability. The Cloud Forest Blue Energy Mechanism brings together payment for environmental services with a pay-for-success model to create a first-of-its-kind financing technique that targets developing countries.

“Cloud forests are among the most water-productive of any tropical forest ecosystem, are uniquely biodiverse and deliver a multitude of clear benefits, but finance for conserving and restoring forests has fallen short of the need,” said Justus Raepple, conservation finance lead for TNC’s Global Water division. “There aren’t many connections in nature like this, where the benefits are so profound to a single beneficiary that the restoration actions can potentially pay for themselves.”

“Restoring cloud forests helps hydropower operators reduce significant sedimentation management costs, and also prolongs the life of the plants, so it avoids having to build more dams, or finding the energy in less environmentally friendly ways,” explained Romas Garbaliauskas, senior director of Conservation Finance at Conservation International.

Incubated by the Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance (The Lab), the Cloud Forest Blue Energy Mechanism recently reached its US$ 1 million fundraising target to finance the development of three pilot projects through financial closure across Latin America. Participants in the funding consortium include the Dutch development bank FMO as lead anchor, the Nordic Development Fund, the Global Environment Facility as a member of the Latin American Water Funds Partnership and Conservation International.

“FMO is proud to be an anchor partner in this phase of the initiative,” said Linda Broekhuizen, Chief Investment Officer of FMO. “The project brings together two of FMO’s focus sectors— energy and agribusiness—in an innovative way. As the project combines a business case for our hydropower clients with strong positive climate impacts and benefits for the local community, it fully aligns with our strategic ambitions.”

According to Leena Klossner, vice president and deputy managing director of the Nordic Development Fund (NDF), “The Cloud Forest Blue Energy Mechanism has significant potential in establishing an innovative financial instrument to support sustainable hydropower production in Latin America. Moreover, the project is well aligned with NDF’s Mandate and Strategy, given its strong focus in identifying and addressing emerging climate change issues. At NDF, we value the potential to scale-up and replicate the mechanism’s model in different ecosystems, and particularly in Africa.”

“Restoration of degraded cloud forests in Latin America is crucial for climate resilience, but more investment is needed,” said Dr. Barbara Buchner, Executive Director of Climate Policy Initiative and Secretariat of The Lab. “The Cloud Forest Blue Energy Mechanism is an innovative and high-impact solution that will restore cloud forests and also provide economic opportunities. The Lab is proud to have helped develop it and excited to see it take off.”

Assuming the three pilot studies succeed and have similar characteristics to one of the proposed pilot catchments in Colombia, the instrument has the potential to sequester 11.4 million tons of CO2 over 20 years through reforestation of 27,000 hectares of cloud forest and conserving a further 54,000 hectares. The mechanism also aims to increase water and energy security, support local economic activity, and reduce communities’ exposure to extreme climate events such as landslides, flooding and droughts.

“Natural climate solutions – like restoring and conserving cloud forests that provide important goods and services that we need on a daily basis – can deliver up to 30% of emission reductions needed by 2030 to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement,” Garbaliauskas added.

With the fundraising target secured, Conservation International and TNC are conducting a series of exploratory conversations with prospective hydropower clients in Latin America and have identified preliminary interest in countries such as Bolivia, Colombia, Peru and Ecuador. Opportunities are being benchmarked against an enabling conditions matrix, including existing local conservation implementation efforts, such as members of the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, to leverage on-the-ground capacity.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube

About The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy is a global conservation organization dedicated to conserving the lands and waters on which all life depends. Guided by science, we create innovative, on-the-ground solutions to our world’s toughest challenges so that nature and people can thrive together. We are tackling climate change, conserving lands, waters and oceans at an unprecedented scale, providing food and water sustainably and helping make cities more sustainable. Working in 72 countries, we use a collaborative approach that engages local communities, governments, the private sector, and other partners. To learn more, visit www.nature.org or follow @nature_press on Twitter.

TNC is a founding member of the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, an agreement established in 2011 between the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), FEMSA Foundation, the Global Environment Facility and (GEF) and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to contribute to water security in Latin America and the Caribbean through the creation and strengthening of Water Funds. Visit www.waterfunds.org

About The Lab 
The Lab identifies, develops, and launches sustainable finance instruments that can drive billions to a low-carbon economy. The Lab’s programs have been funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU), the Netherlands Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Oak Foundation, The Rockefeller Foundation, Shakti Sustainable Energy Foundation, the UK Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy, and the U.S. Department of State. Climate Policy Initiative serves as Secretariat.

​Arlington, Va. (September 20, 2018) – A letter published today in Science, reinforces that cooperative governance is key to avoiding conflict among countries as fish species shift across national and…
​Arlington, Va. (September 20, 2018) – A letter published today in Science, reinforces that cooperative governance is key to avoiding conflict among countries as fish species shift across national and political boundaries due to climate change.   

The letter, “Good Governance for Migratory Species,” supports a recent article in Science’s ‘Policy Forum’ that argues global policy must anticipate conflict over geographic shifts due to climate change. The letter highlights the leadership shown by Pacific Island Countries in cooperative governance of fisheries resources across geographies.

“Cooperative arrangements will need to be more common as climate change drives shifts in species distribution, and the Pacific Islands are leading the way,” writes co-author Jack Kittinger, Senior Director of Conservation International ‘s Center for Oceans.

The governance arrangements made by the eight Pacific Island countries that supply 30 percent of the world’s tuna, and which collaborate as the ‘Parties to the Nauru Agreement’, provide an example of how to equitably share the benefits from fish that move among their exclusive economic zones in response to climatic variability.

“Billions of people across the globe rely on the ocean for food. As climate change redistributes fish populations across national boundaries, there is potential for conflict among countries over newly-shared resources. Governments need to include the effects of ‘species on the move’ in their policy decisions aimed at maintaining economic stability and harmony with neighboring countries,” says Johann Bell, Senior Fisheries Director, Conservation International and co-author of the letter.

To learn about Conservation International’s work in the Pacific Islands, click here. To speak to the authors, please contact sbahramy@conservation.org  

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.  

​Arlington, Va. (September 11, 2018) – Conservation International today issued a statement applauding Representative Carlos Curbelo (R-FL) for authoring the Market Choice Act, which would place a price on carbon emissions while…
​Arlington, Va. (September 11, 2018) – Conservation International today issued a statement applauding Representative Carlos Curbelo (R-FL) for authoring the Market Choice Act, which would place a price on carbon emissions while repealing the federal gas tax. The proposal would achieve significant carbon emission reductions and generate revenue for modernizing the United States’ infrastructure – which would improve and benefit not only our environment, but also our economy.

The Market Choice Act would levy a tax on fossil fuels and certain industrial facilities and products. The additional revenue – $285 billion for the Highway Trust Fund and $18 billion for the Airways Trust Fund– would provide a pathway for robust investment in American infrastructure, resulting in reduced travel times, improved logistical efficiency, and economic growth.

Additionally, the legislation provides funding for natural infrastructure to aid coastal communities, fund reforestation efforts, and regional conservation partnerships. 

We are pleased to see a thoughtful solution to modernize our economy, protect our environment, and improve livelihoods. This is an important first step to putting the U.S. economy on the prosperous path toward a low-carbon, clean energy future. We are grateful for Mr. Curbelo’s leadership on this highly impactful issue,” said Shyla Raghav, Conservation International’s Climate Lead. 

The carbon tax would start at $24 per ton of carbon dioxide emissions and increase at a rate of 2 percent a year. This proposal would cover approximately 85 percent of U.S. GHG emissions. Representative Curbelo’s proposal would reduce carbon emissions by 27–32 percent reductions in net greenhouse gas emissions levels by 2025 and 30–40 percent reductions by 2030. If enacted this legislation would put the Unites States on a path to reducing GHG emissions that would fulfil and exceed the targets set out under the Paris Climate Agreement and Clean Power Plan. 

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.  

Arlington, Va. (September 10, 2018) – Internationally renowned scientist Johan Rockström has been named Chief Scientist of Conservation International, CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan announced today. Rockström will take on his…
Arlington, Va. (September 10, 2018) – Internationally renowned scientist Johan Rockström has been named Chief Scientist of Conservation International, CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan announced today. Rockström will take on his new role in October and will speak at Conservation International’s dinner taking place Wednesday, September 12 in San Francisco, CA just prior to the  Global Climate Action Summit.

Rockström will provide strategic scientific guidance in support of Conservation International’s mission to combat climate change by protecting forests and oceans; applying innovation to conservation science; and developing holistic, scalable models of sustainability.  Rockström will serve as chief scientist for Conservation International probono. This position will also provide support for research at the Potsdam Institute. Rockström will become Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) later this month, together with the highly renowned climate economist Ottmar Edenhofer. The Potsdam Institute is one of Europe’s leading scientific institutions for climate change and sustainability research.

“We are thrilled that Johan Rockström will help guide us at Conservation International,” Sanjayan said. “I have long been an admirer of his astonishing body of work and his expertise and leadership have never been more important to the future of the planet.”

“Johan is an inspiration, not only for research but also his ability to communicate and make change in the world,” said Mike Mascia, Senior Vice President of Conservation International’s Moore Center for Science. “I look forward to working with Johan and our teams of researchers to take Conservation International’s world-class science to even greater heights. Together we can advance knowledge and actions needed to mobilize the global community to protect nature as it is integral to the future of humanity.”

“Science is clear that the future of Humanity on Earth is threatened by continued unsustainable development. It is equally clear that transformations to a prosperous and equitable future is possible, but it will require stewardship of the entire planet, from local ecosystems to the climate system,” said Rockström. “Conservation International and the Potsdam Institute on Climate Impact Research each have their own way of rising to this grand challenge – science has to be the solid basis for informed action to protect people’s livelihoods.”

Rockström, together with Paris Agreement architect Christiana Figueres, is expected to keynote the Thursday, September 13 official opening session of the Global Climate Action Summit. Just prior to that, on the evening of September 12, Rockström and Figueres will headline a private dinner hosted by Conservation International on natural climate solutions. Figueres is a Lui-Walton Distinguished Fellow with Conservation International.

Rockström joins Conservation International as a leading international scholar establishing the nine “planetary boundaries” that together provide a “safe operating space for humanity.” The research, popularized by Rockström’s 2010 TED Talk, has served as a guide for sustainable development by the United Nations, governments, NGOs and companies across the globe.

“Johan’s groundbreaking work on planetary boundaries made it crystal clear that only a radical transformation of key economic systems can safeguard the global commons on which all life on Earth depends,” said Naoko Ishii, CEO and Chairperson of the Global Environment Facility.  “A true champion of the global environment, Johan’s appointment is great news for Conservation International, and for everyone working to protect the future of our planet and human well-being.”  

Rockström’s research has been published in over 100 journals and includes the recent “Hothouse Earth” paper published by Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences. He is also the author of four books: “The Human Quest” (2012) and “Big World, Small Planet” (2015) with National Geographic photographer Mattias Klum, and “Water Resilience for Human Prosperity” (2014) and “Bankrupting Nature” (2012) co-authored with Swedish writer and politician Anders Wijkman.

Before joining as Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) he was the founding director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre (2007-2018) and prior to that the Director of the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) (2004-2012).

Rockström’s media appearances include the documentary “Before the Flood” (2016) and two TED Talks: “How we can all become responsible stewards of Planet Earth” (2013), and “Let the environment guide our development” (2010). His op-eds have appeared in newspapers including The Guardian and Svenska Dagbladet.

A recipient of numerous honors and awards, Rockström has been a Laureate at the Hillary Institute of International Leadership, a Knight of the Legion of Honour (French distinction), and awardee of the 2015 German Environmental Award (Deutsche Umweltpreis). He also received the International Cosmos Prize and Zoological Society of London Award for Conservation Innovation, among others.

Johan Rockström completed his Ph.D. in Ecology at Stockholm University.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”, “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.  

​Arlington, Va. (September 5, 2018) – Conservation International today announced the appointment of James Roth as Senior Vice President for Global Policy and Government Relations, overseeing its U.S. Government Relations…
​Arlington, Va. (September 5, 2018) – Conservation International today announced the appointment of James Roth as Senior Vice President for Global Policy and Government Relations, overseeing its U.S. Government Relations and International Policy teams. Roth begins his new role on September 17.

Roth will lead outreach to the U.S. Congress, the Executive Branch and governments worldwide to promote policies critical to Conservation International’s mission, with a focus on elevating policies supporting the preservation and restoration of nature as an immediate, scalable and cost-effective solution to mitigating climate change.

Roth joins Conservation International from Starbucks, where he led the company’s government affairs work and was a key driver of Starbucks global social impact agenda, which includes a 20-year partnership with Conservation International to ethically source its coffee and help make coffee the world’s first fully sustainable agricultural product.

“Today more than ever, nature needs strong advocates – and it has one in James.  At Starbucks, he helped champion policies in support of employees, smallholder farmers, their families, and the environment. I’m thrilled that he will now put his talents to work to help to advocate for nature and all it provides for people everywhere,” said Conservation International President Jennifer Morris.

Prior to Starbucks, Roth served as Chief of Staff to Senator Evan Bayh (D-IN). During his six years with Bayh, Roth led efforts to achieve bipartisan consensus on numerous policy matters, including on international trade, financial services, tax and healthcare. Before that, he served as Director in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, where he led negotiations on a variety of trade and investment matters with several Asia-Pacific countries and worked directly with governments in sub-Saharan Africa to advance economic development through increased trans-Atlantic trade and investment.  

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more
than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.  

Scientists-Warn-Paris-Agreement-2°C-Target-Is-Too-High

​Over 1.5°C Will Have Devastating Environmental ConsequencesArlington, Va. (August 23, 2018) – In an editorial, Avoiding the Climate Failsafe Point, published today in Science Advances, scientists from Conservation International and the UN…
​Over 1.5°C Will Have Devastating Environmental Consequences

Arlington, Va. (August 23, 2018) – In an editorial, Avoiding the Climate Failsafe Point, published today in Science Advances, scientists from Conservation International and the UN Foundation argue that the Paris Agreement target of keeping global average temperatures from rising 2°C is too high and such an increase could have devastating environmental impacts including the loss of coral reefs, species extinction and an increase in wildfires.

“Policy makers have set the target of allowing no more than an increase of 2°C not for any intrinsic reason, but more simply because that level was thought to be achievable,” writes Conservation International Senior Climate Change Scientist Lee Hannah and Tom Lovejoy, Senior Fellow, UN Foundation.

Hannah and Lovejoy argue ecological systems around the planet will not be able to tolerate temperature rise much beyond 1.5°C but point to ecosystem restoration – keeping forests intact and reforesting degraded lands – as part of the solution to help mitigate global warming and reaching a 1.5°C target.

“According to new estimates, the proportion of C02 in the atmosphere that is generated by destruction and degradation of ecosystems turns out to be much larger than previously estimated …focused and purposeful ecosystem restoration could help us keep global temperature rises at 1.5°C.”

The editorial comes at a time when the IPCC is getting ready to launch its special report on global warming and world leaders prepare to convene at the Global Climate Action Summit, the international climate change summit taking place in San Francisco in September.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.  

​​​London, United Kingdom/Arlington, Virginia, United States (21 August 2018) – The International Coffee Organization (ICO) and the Sustainable Coffee Challenge are pleased to announce the publication of the Guide ​to Access…
​​​London, United Kingdom/Arlington, Virginia, United States (21 August 2018) – The International Coffee Organization (ICO) and the Sustainable Coffee Challenge are pleased to announce the publication of the Guide ​to Access Green and Climate Funding for the Coffee Sector: The Global Environment Facility (GEF).

This new Guide seeks to assist governments of coffee-producing countries to access Global Environmental Facility (GEF) funding in order to address coffee sector challenges. The GEF, in its new four-year replenishment cycle GEF-7 with an allocation of US$4.1 billion, has included coffee in the list of commodities eligible for funding. GEF-7 thereby provides an invaluable opportunity for countries to prioritize investments in development programmes that will not only enable sustainable coffee production, but also have a positive impact on nature conservation, as well on the livelihoods of coffee-producing communities. 


“Actors from across the sector need to drive investments to help ensure the continued sustainability of coffee production in light of the pressing challenges presented by climate change,” said José Sette, Executive Director of the International Coffee Organization.

“To date coffee projects received just US$32.8 million GEF funds, representing less than 0.2% of the total GEF funding pot, and US$223 million in co-financing. The coffee sector needs to take full advantage of such financing mechanisms and act swiftly to unlock green and climate finance by promoting practices, strategies and enablers for a climate resilient coffee supply chain and economy”.

“The opportunity of GEF-7 is extremely timely for the global coffee sector, as nearly every major coffee-producing landscape is under stress due to the impact of climate change”, said Bambi Semroc, Vice-President for Sustainable Markets and Strategy at Conservation International.

“Rising temperatures, droughts and changing weather patterns are predicted to reduce the overall land suitable for growing coffee by 50%. As traditional growing areas decrease, farmers may look to plant coffee in protected locations situated in biodiversity hotspots, such as forested areas located higher up on mountainsides that are designated for conservation”.

To address such complex challenges, Conservation International convenes and facilitates the Sustainable Coffee Challenge – an industry-wide effort to spur the actions and investments necessary to make coffee the first sustainable agriculture product in the world. The Guide to Access Green and Climate Funding for the Coffee Sector: The Global Environment Facility (GEF) is the outcome of the partnership between the International Coffee Organization and the Sustainable Coffee Challenge, formalized at the 121st Session of the International Coffee Council held in April this year in Mexico City.

The Guide can be accessed here and printed copies will be distributed at the 122nd Session of the International Coffee Council which will take place from 17 to 21 September in London, United Kingdom. Both Organizations will be developing further support guides on international financing opportunities to help drive investments in the coffee sector to address the global impact of climate change.

NOTES TO EDITORS

About the International Coffee Organization
The International Coffee Organization (ICO) is a multilateral organization supporting exporting and importing countries to improve the sustainability of the coffee sector. It provides a high-level forum for all public and private stakeholders in the sector; official statistics on coffee production, trade and consumption; and support for the development and funding of technical cooperation projects and public-private partnerships.

As part of the ICO´s mandate and Five-Year Action Plan, the Organization’s main objectives are to identify innovative solutions to increase social, environmental and economic sustainability and address challenges such as climate change; the livelihood of coffee growers; gender equality; ageing workers and plantations; and compliance with quality and safety standards.

More information at: www.ico.org

About the International Coffee Council
The International Coffee Council is the governing body of the ICO, bringing together Governments from countries which export and import coffee. The Council meets twice a year to discuss wide-ranging issues with the aim of promoting a sustainable coffee sector. The 122nd Session of the International Coffee Council will be held from 17 to 21 September 2018 at the International Maritime Organization, London, United Kingdom.

About the Sustainable Coffee Challenge
The Sustainable Coffee Challenge convenes, unites and urges the coffee sector and conservation partners across the industry to spur the actions and investments necessary to make coffee the first sustainable agriculture product in the world. The Challenge is committed to stimulating demand for sustainable coffee across the value chain, from the policymaking level to the final consumer. By encouraging demand for sustainable coffee, it leads to investments that enable the transition to a sustainable production and ensuring the coffee we drink is a sustainable product. The Challenge was formed by Conservation International and founding partner Starbucks and launched during the Paris climate meetings in 2015. More information at: www.sustaincoffee.org

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking ‘Nature Is Speaking’ campaign and its series of virtual reality projects including ‘Valen’s Reef’ and ‘Under the Canopy’. Follow Conservation International’s work on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About the Global Environmental Facility
The Global Environment Facility was established on the eve of the 1992 Rio Earth Summit to help tackle our planet’s most pressing environmental problems.  Since then, the GEF has provided over US$17.9 billion in grants and mobilized an additional US$93.2 billion in co-financing for more than 4,500 projects in 170 countries. Today, the GEF is an international partnership of 183 countries, international institutions, civil society organizations and the private sector that addresses global environmental issues. More information at: https://www.thegef.org

Further information:
For queries about the Guide to Access Green and Climate Funding for the Coffee Sector: The Global Environment Facility (GEF), the International Coffee Organization, and International Coffee Council: Gerardo Patacconi, ICO Head of Operations (patacconi@ico.org) or press@ico.org (+44 (0) 20 7612 0624)

For queries about the Guide to Access Green and Climate Funding for the Coffee Sector: The Global Environment Facility (GEF), Conservation International and the Sustainable Coffee Challenge: Jenny Parker McCloskey, Vice-President Media, Conservation International (jparker@conservation.org) or media@conservation.org (+1 917 763 3263)


​Arlington, Va. (August 9, 2018) – "Dulce," a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, has been selected to screen at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival running September 6…
​Arlington, Va. (August 9, 2018) – “Dulce,” a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, has been selected to screen at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival running September 6 – 16, 2018 in Toronto, Ontario. Tickets are available here.  

Filmed in La Ensenada on the Pacific coast of Colombia, the film follows a young girl, Dulce, whose small fishing community is struggling with the effects of climate change on their lives. In Dulce’s community, climate change means higher tides from rising sea levels in the Pacific Ocean.

“Dulce” was co-directed by Guille Isa and Angello Faccini and produced by filmmakers Jungles in Paris. It was executive produced by actor and activist Lee Pace, and Margarita Mora and Anastasia Khoo on behalf of Conservation International.

As the film opens, Dulce is being taught to swim by her mother, Betty. For this community, swimming is survival: It is a skill Dulce needs to carry on her family’s livelihood harvesting piangua, a cockle, from nearby mangroves. Meanwhile, rising tides have wiped out entire villages in recent years near La Ensenada, heightening Betty’s urgency to help Dulce master this skill.

For generations, Afro-Colombian residents of the Iscuandé River delta, which includes La Ensenada, have fished and harvested piangua. But the cockle have been in decline due to overharvesting – a development that has spurred communities like Dulce’s to learn to conserve coastal areas from pollution and ocean erosion.

“The decision to tell this story through the eyes of a mother and daughter was deliberate. Across the globe, women are on the front lines of climate change. The urgency we feel as Betty struggles to teach her daughter to swim reminds us that that women are more likely than men to feel the impacts of climate change, especially in the developing world,” said Anastasia Khoo, Conservation International’s Chief Marketing Officer. “Increasingly, they are also the ones rising to the challenge to speak up and force change.”

This film arrives at a promising moment in Colombia’s environmental history. Last year, President Juan Manuel Santos expanded the coastal ecosystems protected under the Malpelo Fauna and Flora Sanctuary along the Pacific Ocean. The national park expanded by 1.7 million hectares, from 950,000 hectares to 2.7 million hectares.

Conservation International and Fondo Acción have joined in the creation of a conservation trust fund, La Minga, to benefit the Colombia’s Pacific coast as well. It is home to over 30,000 people of primarily Afro-Colombian descent, as well as 1,400 species, including 80 percent of the region’s humpback whale breeding grounds, and some of the country’s most intact mangrove forests.

In the tradition of Conservation International’s other films (“Nature is Speaking,” “Valen’s Reef,” “Under the Canopy” and the recently released “My Africa”), “Dulce” puts a human face on the quest for environmental protection.  

For Conservation International, it is an effective strategy. Viewers of “Under the Canopy” responded by helping the organization, with the backing of SC Johnson, to protect 10,000 acres of rainforest in record time. 

Jungles in Paris, cofounded by Oliver and Darrell Hartman in 2013, also has been recognized for its environmental-themed films. The mission-driven media company focuses on subjects of nature and culture, having produced short documentaries featured at festivals such as Hot Docs, Atlanta and Big Sky.

Co-directors Isa and Faccini have also seen their work presented in numerous international film festivals. Isa’s films have appeared at Barcelona, Amsterdam, Riverrun, Sidewalk and more. Faccini has among his film credits Lina (2016), a winner of a Young Director’s Award at Cannes and Best Direction Award at the Malaga Film Festival.

Assets for media use:

Social media: https://www.facebook.com/DulceDoc/

Images: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Wj-qv4mnUkBmiEaisPWC2hLTH-3tkaA0     

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube

About Jungles in Paris
Jungles in Paris, founded in 2013 and based in New York City, tells stories about nature and culture. We use a range of media to explore planet Earth in all its multi-colored diversity, with a special focus on roots and place. Spotlighting craft, culture, geography and wildlife, we aim to celebrate subjects — human and non-human alike — that are often at risk of extinction in a globalized, growth-driven 21st century. We prioritize the local, the endemic, the time-honored, and the meaningful. Rather than pure advocacy, we practice purpose-driven media. We aim in our work to restore a sense of enchantment
around the things that matter, employing creative nonfiction methods to propose a more enlightened way of engaging with the ecosystems and cultural possibilities around us.