Abstract: Conservation International-Guyana today announced the appointment of Damian Fernandes as Executive Director. ​Georgetown, Guyana (April 11, 2019) – Conservation International-Guyana today announced the appointment of Damian Fernandes as Executive…
Abstract: Conservation International-Guyana today announced the appointment of Damian Fernandes as Executive Director.
​Georgetown, Guyana (April 11, 2019) – Conservation International-Guyana today announced the appointment of Damian Fernandes as Executive Director. Fernandes was selected as part of an open recruitment process. He is a graduate of the University of Guyana and has eighteen years of experience working on conservation and community development in Guyana.

Fernandes was the first commissioner of the Protected Areas Commission (PAC) and supported the development of the National Protected Areas System. Most recently, he worked with the North Rupununi District Development Board (NRDDB) and the World Wildlife Fund-Guianas in advocating for integrated land-use planning, conservation, and sustainable development in the Guyana’s North Rupununi Wetlands.

“I am grateful for this opportunity to serve my country, and to build on the efforts of my predecessors,” said Fernandes. “I look forward to joining the dedicated team at Conservation International-Guyana, and to working with our partners as we shape solutions for Guyana’s environmental challenges.”

Former Vice President of Conservation International-Guyana Dr. David Singh said, “I wish to extend my heartiest congratulations to Damian on his appointment. He is the right person to lead Conservation International-Guyana at this time.” 

As the Executive Director, Fernandes will lead the program and guide the implementation of conservation and sustainable development projects within the country.

For media inquiries, please contact Kipp Lanham, Media Relations Manager, Conservation International, at klanham@conservation.org.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

Abstract: Today, Conservation International was named a Finalist in the Creativity category of Fast Company's 2019 World Changing Ideas. Awards ​Arlington, Va. (April 8, 2019) – Today, Conservation International was named…
Abstract: Today, Conservation International was named a Finalist in the Creativity category of Fast Company’s 2019 World Changing Ideas. Awards
​Arlington, Va. (April 8, 2019) – Today, Conservation International was named a Finalist in the Creativity category of Fast Company’s 2019 World Changing Ideas Awards for its virtual reality films (“Valen’s Reef”, “Under the Canopy”, and “My Africa”). All of the finalists are highlighted in the May issue of the print magazine, which hits newsstands on April 16th.

Now in its third year, the World Changing Ideas Award showcases 17 winners, more than 200 finalists, and more than 300 honorable mentions, with Health and Wellness, Education, and AI and Data among the most popular categories. A panel of eminent judges selected winners and finalists from a pool of more than 2,000 entries, such as Food, Energy, and Developing World technology. The 2019 awards featured entries from across the globe, from New Zealand to Shanghai to Switzerland.

“To receive this acknowledgement among other innovative organizations with such transformative ideas, especially after such a competitive submission field, is truly affirming,” said Conservation International Chief Marketing Officer Anastasia Khoo. “It empowers us to continue to share these stories of where we work in the world to affect positive change, where people and nature can thrive together.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About the World Changing Ideas Awards
World Changing Ideas is one of Fast Company’s major annual awards programs and is focused on social good, seeking to elevate finished products and brave concepts that make the world better. A panel of judges from across sectors choose winners, finalists, and honorable mentions based on feasibility and the potential for impact. With a goal of awarding ingenuity and fostering innovation, Fast Company draws attention to ideas with great potential and helps them expand their reach to inspire more people to start working on solving the problems that affect us all.

Abstract: Conservation International today announced the Ecuador Azul fund, a $6 million endowment fund supporting the conservation, management, and long-term sustainability of Ecuador's marine protected areas (MPAs). ​Arlington, Va. (March…
Abstract: Conservation International today announced the Ecuador Azul fund, a $6 million endowment fund supporting the conservation, management, and long-term sustainability of Ecuador’s marine protected areas (MPAs).
​Arlington, Va. (March 29, 2019) – Conservation International today announced the Ecuador Azul fund, a $6 million endowment fund supporting the conservation, management, and long-term sustainability of Ecuador’s marine protected areas (MPAs).

Ecuador Azul will initially fund five MPAs spanning nearly 200,000 hectares (494,211 acres) of diverse marine, coastal, and estuarine ecosystems that comprise Ecuador’s Marine and Coastal Protected Areas Network. The five MPAS include: Galera-San Francisco Marine Reserve, Pacoche Marine Coastal Wildlife Refuge, Machalilla National Park, Puntilla Santa Elena Marine Coastal Fauna Production Reserve, and Manglares El Morro Wildlife Refuge. These areas contain a range of biodiversity, from the world’s largest cluster of manta rays to one of the most extensive mangrove areas along the Pacific coast.

“Since 2005, Conservation International Ecuador has helped the Ministry of Environment create seven MPAs, including four of the five that will initially receive resources from Ecuador Azul,” said Luis Suarez, Vice President and Executive Director of Conservation International-Ecuador. “The long-term goal is to have a solid financial mechanism to guarantee the effective management of all of Ecuador’s MPAs, including new ones that Ecuador establishes, and to continue our efforts of conservation and sustainable development in this wonderful mega-diverse country.”

Managed by Ecuador’s Fondo de Inversión Ambiental Sostenible/Sustainable Environmental Investment Fund (FIAS), Ecuador Azul will complement existing public funds deployed from the Ecuadorian government and managed by FIAS, including the Protected Areas Fund (FAP), an endowment fund designed to support Ecuador’s National System of Protected Areas.

“The FAP provides a steady stream of financial support for Ecuadorian protected areas, but only 41 percent of the nation’s MPAs have access to this funding source,” said Ana Albán, executive director of FIAS. “Due to the pressure of human activities and limited investments in these areas in past decades, additional contributions are necessary to improve effective management and conservation in the MPAs.”

Ecuador’s MPAs are not alone in this struggle. A 2017 study published in the journal Nature—by authors including two Conservation International scientists—found that MPAs need adequate
money and staff to reach their full potential.

“We are thrilled that an organization like Conservation International recognizes the importance of channeling much-needed financial assistance to Ecuador’s MPAs to ensure these spectacular natural areas thrive for generations to come,” said Albán.

The annual interest generated by the endowment fund will help to finance implementation of management plans for the five MPAs and cover some operational and monitoring costs.

The principal donor to Ecuador Azul is the Walton Family Foundation. Also, financial support comes from the Global Environment Facility, through a grant from Conservation International as the GEF partner agency of the project “Implementation of the Strategic Plan of Ecuador Mainland Marine and Coastal Protected Areas Network.”

“The Ecuador Azul fund is a testament to the commitment of the Ecuadorian government to ensure the long-term sustainability and management of its marine protected areas,” said Renu Saini, Environment Program Officer at the Walton Family Foundation. “It is truly humbling to see our investment come full cycle and know that these precious areas will be protected in perpetuity.”

“We are pleased to continue our long-standing support of Ecuador’s protected area system through the expanded coverage of the MPA network and the critical sustainable financing needed for effective MPA management,” said Gustavo Fonseca, Global Environment Facility Director of Programs. “We know that effective management is the key to protecting these areas that are important for biodiversity, which will also increase fish stocks in surrounding areas.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

Abstract: Conservation International released the following statement from Senior Vice President of Global Policy and Government Relations James Roth on the introduction of H.R. 9, the Climate Action Now Act…
Abstract: Conservation International released the following statement from Senior Vice President of Global Policy and Government Relations James Roth on the introduction of H.R. 9, the Climate Action Now Act
​Bill Seeks to Return U.S. to the Paris Agreement

Arlington, Va. (March 27, 2019) – Conservation International released the following statement from Senior Vice President of Global Policy and Government Relations James Roth on the introduction of H.R. 9,  the Climate Action Now Act:

We agree with the Climate Action Now Act’s goal of having the United States comply with the Paris Agreement. Preventing further climate change will take leadership that transcends global borders and party lines. We applaud these important steps and will continue working with all walks of life, nature and wildlife included—because nature is 30 percent of the solution—to take further climate action, forward.

For more information or to arrange an interview:

Salma Bahramy
Director of Media Relations​
+1-917-543-7211
sbahramy@conservation.org

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.  

Abstract: A world first legal framework to drive the sustainable development and conservation of one the most biodiverse regions on Earth ​Manokwari, West Papua, Indonesia – On March 20, the West…
Abstract: A world first legal framework to drive the sustainable development and conservation of one the most biodiverse regions on Earth

​Manokwari, West Papua, Indonesia – On March 20, the West Papua parliament approved legislation that will make West Papua the country’s first-ever conservation province. The newly established West Papua Conservation Province is based on a first of its kind legal framework that puts sustainable development and conservation at the forefront of any economic activity or development.  

The West Papua Conservation Province will protect the most intact marine and terrestrial ecosystems remaining in Indonesia, promote the development of sustainable livelihoods, and recognize the rights of indigenous peoples. The legislation comes three years after West Papua first declared​ it would set out to become a conservation province and is a significant shift in moving towards more sustainable development.

The Chairperson of the West Papua Regional Representative Council Pieter Kodjol said,  “The special regional regulation on sustainable development is to ensure that development in West Papua is carried out in accordance with environmental rules while ensuring community well-being.”

“In vital biodiverse places like West Papua, the stakes are high and the margin for error slim, so reconciling development and conservation is something we must get right. Now the world can look to West Papua for a new global standard. This legislation helps demonstrate that protecting Earth’s ecosystems unlocks value for sustainable development and livelihoods. It’s a blueprint for development and conservation that benefits everyone on Earth,”  said Jennifer Morris, president of Conservation International.

“Thanks to everyone involved, included our Conservation International West Papua Team, this breakthrough policy shows we can rise to the challenges of our time,” Morris continued. “To the West Papuan Regional Government, Governor Dominggus Mandacan, and staff, thank you—for acting now and for the work to come. We are inspired by your vision and look forward to working with you to make it a reality.”

Launched by the West Papua Government, the new policy brings together communities, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and academics to define a path for sustainable development. The policy sets a governmental framework that favors economic development, community welfare, and the conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services to people, including the sustainable management of natural resources.

A key part of the new policy includes the empowerment of Papuans through the protection of  natural resource rights and provision of equitable and sustainable development. Home to 870,000 people, 80% of Papuans live rurally and rely on nature for their livelihoods.

West Papua, located in the Bird’s Head Seascape, is one of the most biodiverse regions on Earth, home to more than 1,800 species of fish, three quarters of the world’s hard corals, and to this day new species are found regularly. With 90% forest cover, it holds the world’s second largest rainforest, much of which remains unexplored. The 120,777 km2 province also holds the world’s largest mangrove forest and significant peatlands, habitats which hold four times the amount of carbon than the average terrestrial forest and are essential to combatting climate change.

Available content for media (***Please Provide Image Credits***)
Photographs Available at:  http://ci.tandemvault.com/lightboxes/nVYbY3mGi?t=5aJxA37zz

For more information, contact:
Emmeline Johansen, Communications Director, Conservation International |
Mobile +64 4 277 793 401 | Email: ejohansen@conservation.org  ​

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy”and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  ​ 

​Arlington, Va. (March 15, 2019) – The Government of Liberia in partnership with the Embassy of Sweden in Monrovia and Conservation International is holding the Blue Oceans Conference in Monrovia…
​Arlington, Va. (March 15, 2019) – The Government of Liberia in partnership with the Embassy of Sweden in Monrovia and Conservation International is holding the Blue Oceans Conference in Monrovia from March 18 – 21, 2019. This is the first marine conference in West Africa, representing a historic moment for the country.

“This conference provides a platform to identify ground-breaking solutions to ensure the sustainable management of our ecosystem. Protecting our beaches, coastal and marine resources are key to our survival as a nation and its in direct alignment with Liberia National Development Agenda; the Pro-Poor Agenda for Prosperity and Development there is no time for excuses,” said Nathaniel Blama, the Executive Director of the Environmental Protection Agency, speaking on behalf of the government’s Steering Committee which he chairs along with  Liberia Maritime Authority (LiMA) and the National Fisheries and Aquaculture Authority (NaFAA).

Focusing on the themes of marine pollution, climate change, sustainable fishing, and the sustainable use of the ocean for economic growth (the “blue economy”), the conference will identify innovative solutions for ensuring the long-term sustainability of Africa’s marine environment and reversing the decline in the health of the ocean for people, the planet and prosperity.

The ocean has a large depository of plastic debris and other pollutants including riverine discharges, agricultural, sediment, solid waste and agricultural run-offs. In addition, coastal and marine habitats and resources are under threat from pollution, over-harvesting of resources, inappropriate development in the coastal zone, and poor inland and land-based management.

Most Liberia’s population lives within 30 miles of the coast where they are increasingly vulnerable to climate change. Challenges associated with climate change and ocean acidification require enhanced vulnerability and impact assessments, mitigation and adaptation plans, resilience building and disaster risk reduction strategies.

The conference aims to build on the impact being made and increase the likelihood of furthering the policies needed to address climate change.​

West Africa is rich in marine resources but often much of the potential benefits from fisheries do not flow back into the region.

The call for a “Blue Economy” portion of the conference will focus on the decoupling of socio-economic development from environmental degradation. Two particularly significant pieces of current and future blue economic growth across in Liberia are tourism and shipping.

The conference comes at a time when Liberia is looking to diversify its economy for broader growth.

“Building off the momentum of the conferences in both New York and Nairobi, we are excited to take the conversation forward and look at practical next steps for West Africa’s ocean conservation. This is a major opportunity for Liberia to join global efforts to conserve our oceans,” said Conservation International Liberia Country Director Jessica Donovan.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy”and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

​London, UK (February 18, 2019) – Today, Conservation International joins a global partnership between the Global Environment Facility, the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Environment Programme, the United…
​London, UK (February 18, 2019) – Today, Conservation International joins a global partnership between the Global Environment Facility, the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Environment Programme, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization,  and the governments of Burkina Faso, Colombia, Guyana, Indonesia, Kenya, Mongolia, the Philippines and Peru to improve conditions for artisanal miners while slashing harmful mercury emissions.

The new, five-year $180-million program is led by the Global Environment Facility-backed Global Opportunities for the Long-term Development of the ASGM Sector (GEF GOLD) and aims to reduce the use of mercury in artisanal gold mining and introduce and facilitate access to mercury-free extraction methods, while also working with governments to formalize the sector, promoting miners rights, safety and their access to markets.

Urgent action is needed to protect millions of men, women and children exposed to toxic levels of mercury through gold production every year, according to the backers of the new $180-million program to reform the artisanal and small-scale mining sector.

“From smartphones to wedding rings, gold passes through all of our hands every day. But for most of us the source of that gold, and its real cost, remains a mystery,” Gustavo Fonseca, GEF Director of Programs, said.

“Introducing safe, mercury-free technologies into the ASGM sector will help provide a safe transition to job formality and dignified work for millions, while putting an end to the environmental impacts that can pave the way to sustainably produced gold.”

“Mercury is not necessary to mine and process gold. In the developed world, mercury has not been widely used in gold production for a century. By improving small-scale gold mining in the developing world, we can improve the health of people and preserve Nature that provides us so much. That means mining in the right places and in the right ways. It means professionalizing practices to not only protect human health and the environment, but to create better returns for mining communities. With the support of the Global Environment Facility, and in close consultation with the government, we are doing exactly this in Guyana,” said Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO, Conservation International.

Every year, more than 2,700 tons of gold is mined around the world. Twenty percent of that – over 500 tons annually – is produced by artisanal and small-scale miners. These miners and processors, the majority of them in developing countries, work in often harsh conditions, without the protection of industry regulations on pay, health or safety, to sate the global hunger for gold for jewelry, investment and consumer products.

With many miners relying on toxic, mercury-based extraction methods, the ASGM sector is also the world’s single largest source of man-made mercury emissions, releasing as much as 1,000 tons of mercury (almost 40 percent of the global total) into the atmosphere every year.

“By phasing out mercury use and connecting miners to markets for responsibly produced and sourced minerals, GEF GOLD will help to ensure the gold value chain both supports miners and provides consumers with access to ethically produced, environmentally sustainable gold,” Jacob Duer, Head of the UN Environment Chemicals and Health branch said.

“Promoting and facilitating access to non-mercury processing techniques for artisanal and small-scale miners is vital – not only to reduce mercury emissions, but to protect the health of vulnerable communities.”

Studies indicate that mercury exposure in artisanal and small-scale miners is a major, largely neglected global health problem – putting miners and their communities at risk of impacts from permanent brain damage to seizures, vision and hearing loss, and delayed childhood development.

As many as 15 million people work in the ASGM sector globally – including 4.5 million women and over 600,000 children. While ASGM represents a development opportunity for rural populations, who often have few livelihood alternatives, miners operate on the edges of legality in many countries, with ASGM either banned outright or limited by legislation and licensing procedures designed primarily for large-scale operations.

By supporting the regulatory and policy reforms needed to formalize the work of artisanal and small-scale miners across the eight program countries, GEF GOLD aims to secure miners’ livelihoods, through opening up the access to markets and finance needed to increase incomes and enable the uptake of mercury-free technology. By phasing out mercury use, the program aims to achieve eventual mercury emission reductions of 369 tons, supporting countries’ commitments under the Minamata Convention on Mercury to reduce and, where feasible, eliminate mercury use in the sector.

Alongside working directly with artisanal and small-scale miners and national authorities, the GEF GOLD program will work with the private sector across industries and partners including the Better Gold Initiative, Alliance for Responsible Mining and Fairtrade International to promote compliance with international standards on responsible mineral supply chains.

NOTES TO EDITORS:

Images available at: https://bit.ly/2Gq3BoI

Additional quotes:

UN Environment:

“Mercury emissions impact health and ecosystems, contaminating the food we eat, the water we drink and the air we breathe. This is a long-term problem we need to confront now. Joint initiatives like GEF GOLD demonstrate that when we unite for environmental action we can protect community health, provide livelihoods to those most in need, and save the planet.”

Joyce Msuya, Acting Executive Director, UN Environment

UNDP:

“Transforming the extremely harmful practice of using mercury in the artisanal and small scale gold mining is essential to protect human health and ecosystems. GEF GOLD is a flagship initiative designed to tackle the global concern on mercury emissions. About 1.14 million people are engaged in ASGM in Colombia, Indonesia, Kenya, and Peru. As part of GEF GOLD, UNDP will support the adoption of sound mining practices in these countries through strengthening institutions, policy and regulation framework, increasing the access to mercury-free technologies, disseminating best practices, rising awareness and sharing information. These package of interventions will contribute to poverty alleviation, addressing inequality, and improving the health and livelihoods of vulnerable communities engaged in ASGM.”

Abdoulaye Mar Dieye, Assistant Secretary-General, Assistant Administrator and Director of the Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, UNDP

UNIDO:

“The widespread use of mercury in the artisanal and small-scale sector affects the environment and people, particularly in developing countries. UNIDO is proud to be a part of the GEF GOLD programme, which supports innovative and viable solutions focusing on formalization, access to markets and finances, mercury free technologies and awareness raising. UNIDO will be working in Burkina Faso, and jointly with UNEP in Mongolia and the Philippines, with the aim of providing sustainable livelihood for the miners and their communities.”

Philippe Scholtès, Managing Director of Programme Development and Technical Cooperation, UNIDO

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more
than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.”  Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube

About the Global Environment Facility
The Global Environment Facility was established on the eve of the 1992 Rio Earth Summit to help tackle our planet’s most pressing environmental problems. Since then, the GEF has provided over $17.9 billion in grants and mobilized an additional $93.2 billion in co-financing for more than 4500 projects in 170 countries. Today, the GEF is an international partnership of 183 countries, international institutions, civil society organizations and the private sector that addresses global environmental issues.

​​New Memorandum of Understanding between the Government and NGO Conservation International will use one of the world's largest marine protected areas to demonstrate a win-win for nature, people and economy.Noumea,…
​​New Memorandum of Understanding between the Government and NGO Conservation International will use one of the world’s largest marine protected areas to demonstrate a win-win for nature, people and economy.

Noumea, New Caledonia (February​ 12, 2019) – Today the Government of New Caledonia and non-profit NGO, Conservation International inked a Memorandum of Understanding to collaborate on the protection and improved management of the Natural Park of the Coral Sea, which at 1.3M square kilometers is one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, through integrated sustainable development and regional cooperation.

The partners aim to use the marine protected area – an area more than twice the size of mainland France – to demonstrate the importance of nature and how its sustainable use can support not only economic development and provide lasting gains, but also ensure long-term human wellbeing. They noted that the involvement of local people  as active stakeholders and stewards of nature is essential to this effort, so that all needs and uses, public, private, and industrial are addressed.

Dr. Richard Jeo, the Senior Vice-President of Conservation International’s Asia Pacific Field Division, and signee, said, ‘We’re excited about this partnership with New Caledonia as they are leaders in sustainable development and nature conservation.  New Caledonia is committed to reinventing itself as a nature-based economy.’

‘While our work is aimed at primarily benefitting the citizens and protecting the pristine and unique biodiversity found in these waters, the ultimate measure of success for our organisation is to make this, and every other investment made in nature, an effective and significant model to inspire others. Never before in human history has nature-based solutions been more important.’

Dr. Jeo paid respects to other ground-breaking marine conservation commitments from the Pacific Islands region, which Conservation International have helped design and remain highly involved in through the Pacific Oceanscape, including the Cook Islands’ Marae Moana and Kiribati’s Phoenix Islands Protected Area, noting that it is Conservation International’s experience, knowledge and learnings from these efforts from which this conservation model builds on.

The agreement describes plans to develop tools and innovative conservation projects that promote the link between nature and culture in New Caledonia. This includes the amplification of Conservation International’straditional voyaging project in Samoa which the NGO has implemented with the Samoa Voyaging Society and Government, providing powerful conservation workshops to coastal communities, using shared culture and modern science. The partners also plan to promote and strengthen the Caledonian model of sustainable fisheries by extending cooperation with Arctic Circle and neighboring countries on Responsible Fisheries, especially in the areas of transparency, efficiency, and certification.

For more information, contact:

Emmeline Johansen, Communications Director, Asia Pacific Field Division, Conservation International | Mobile +64 277 793 401 | Email: ejohansen@conservation.org  

About Conservation International in New Caledonia

With over 30 years of experience in global conservation, and over 16 years working directly in New Caledonia with communities, government and the private sector, the CI New Caledonia office have helped to define environmental policies and strategies in New Caledonia, define key biodiversity areas for protection in all three provinces, and create their single protected area in co-management between indigenous people and provincial authority. Building upon a strong foundation of science, partnership and field demonstration, CI empowers societies to responsibly and sustainably care for nature and its global biodiversity to promote the long-term well-being of people. Founded in 1987 and headquartered in the Washington, D.C. area. CI employs 900 staff in nearly 30 countries on four continents and works with more than 1,000 partners around the world. Learn more about our work in the Pacific:

http://www.conservation.org/where/pages/pacific-oceanscape.aspx

About New Caledonia and the Natural Park of the Coral Sea
The Natural Park of the Coral Sea (NPCS) is the world’s largest multiple use marine park encompassing the entire EEZ at the time of establishment in April, 2014). These waters are sanctuaries to sharks, whales, turtles and Manta Rays and are home to the world’s third-largest population of dugong. Additionally, the New Caledonia territory boasts one of the world’s largest lagoons at 24,000 km2, circled by a 1,600 km2 coral reef which 1.5M ha are listed as World Heritage Sites. On land, New Caledonia is the smallest hotspots in the world (the size of New Jersey) but boasts the highest endemic species diversity per square kilometer. The greatest challenges to nature in New Caledonia include climate change, invasive species, mining, bushfires and erosion.

 

​ 

Arlington, Va. (January 25, 2019) – "Dulce," a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, began screening today as a selection in the Documentary Short section of the Sundance Institute's 2019 Sundance Film…

Arlington, Va. (January 25, 2019) – “Dulce,” a short documentary film produced by Conservation International, began screening today as a selection in the Documentary Short section of the Sundance Institute’s 2019 Sundance Film Festival. It will run from January 24 – February 3, 2019 in Park City, Utah. Tickets are available here.

In June, “Dulce” premiered at the Palm Springs International ShortFest where it won Best Documentary Short. At the Toronto International Film Festival in August, the short documentary film was selected to screen. It is currently featured on The New York Times Op-Docs channel. 

Filmed in La Ensenada on the Pacific coast of Colombia, the film follows a young girl, Dulce, whose small fishing community is struggling with the effects of climate change on their lives. In Dulce’s community, climate change means higher tides from rising sea levels. 

“Dulce” was co-directed by Guille Isa and Angello Faccini and produced by filmmakers Jungles in Paris. It was executive produced by actor and activist Lee Pace, and Margarita Mora and Anastasia Khoo on behalf of Conservation International. 

As the film opens, Dulce is being taught to swim by her mother, Betty. For this community, swimming is survival: It is a skill Dulce needs to carry on her family’s livelihood harvesting piangua, a type of clam, from nearby mangroves. Meanwhile, rising tides have wiped out entire villages in recent years near La Ensenada, heightening Betty’s urgency to help Dulce master this skill. 

“The decision to tell this story through the eyes of a mother and daughter was deliberate. Across the globe, women are on the front lines of climate change. The urgency we feel as Betty struggles to teach her daughter to swim reminds us that that women are more likely than men to feel the impacts of climate change, especially in the developing world,” said Anastasia Khoo, Conservation International’s Chief Marketing Officer. “Increasingly, they are also the ones rising to the challenge to speak up and force change.”

In the tradition of Conservation International’s other films (“Nature is Speaking,” “Valen’s Reef,” “Under the Canopy” and the recently released “My Africa”), “Dulce” puts a human face on the quest for environmental protection. 

For Conservation International, it is an effective strategy. Viewers of “Under the Canopy” responded by helping the organization, with the backing of SC Johnson, to protect 10,000 acres of rainforest in record time. 

Jungles in Paris, cofounded by Oliver and Darrell Hartman in 2013, also has been recognized for its environmental-themed films. The mission-driven media company focuses on subjects of nature and culture, having produced short documentaries featured at festivals such as Hot Docs, Atlanta and Big Sky. 

Co-directors Isa and Faccini have also seen their work presented in numerous international film festivals. Isa’s films have appeared at Barcelona, Amsterdam, Riverrun, Sidewalk and more. Faccini has among his film credits Lina (2016), a winner of a Young Director’s Award at Cannes and Best Direction Award at the Malaga Film Festival. 

Assets for media use:

Social media: https://www.facebook.com/DulceDoc/

Images: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Wj-qv4mnUkBmiEaisPWC2hLTH-3tkaA0      

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa”“Under the Canopy”and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blogFacebookTwitterInstagram, and YouTube.  

About Jungles in Paris 
Jungles in Paris, founded in 2013 and based in New York City, tells stories about nature and culture. We use a range of media to explore planet Earth in all its multi-colored diversity, with a special focus on roots and place. Spotlighting craft, culture, geography and wildlife, we aim to celebrate subjects — human and non-human alike — that are often at risk of extinction in a globalized, growth-driven 21st century. We prioritize the local, the endemic, the time-honored, and the meaningful. Rather than pure advocacy, we practice purpose-driven media. We aim in our work to restore a sense of enchantment 
around the things that matter, employing creative nonfiction methods to propose a more enlightened way of engaging with the ecosystems and cultural possibilities around us.

About Sundance Institute
Founded in 1981 by Robert Redford, Sundance Institute is a nonprofit organization that provides and preserves the space for artists in film, theatre, and new media to create and thrive. The Institute’s signature Labs, granting, and mentorship programs, dedicated to developing new work, take place throughout the year in the U.S. and internationally. The Sundance Film Festival and other public programs connect audiences to artists in igniting new ideas, discovering original voices, and building a community dedicated to independent storytelling. Sundance Institute has supported such projects as Mudbound, Get Out, The Big Sick, Strong Island, Blackfish, Top of the Lake, Winter’s Bone, The Wolfpack, Dear White People, Brooklyn, Little Miss Sunshine, 20 Feet From Stardom, Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fruitvale Station, Spring Awakening, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder and Fun Home.

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​​Partnership to Improve Fisheries in Developing Regions of the WorldArlington, Va. (January 14, 2019) – Conservation International and Ocean Outcomes (O2) today announced a global partnership to establish a more…
​​Partnership to Improve Fisheries in Developing Regions of the World

Arlington, Va. (January 14, 2019) – Conservation International and Ocean Outcomes (O2) today announced a global partnership to establish a more sustainable seafood supply chain. By leveraging each other’s experience and expertise, both organizations will develop and apply strategic approaches that will shift fisheries toward more environmentally sustainable, socially responsible and economically viable models.

Through the partnership, organizations will jointly demonstrate the benefits of sustainable fisheries at any scale based upon best practices in ecological, social and business performance. In addition to existing efforts, Conservation International and O2 will jointly fundraise for future projects which address the myriad environmental, social and economic issues facing many fisheries.

“Conservation International’s partnership with Ocean Outcomes brings together our respective strengths to support the transition of fisheries to sustainable production,” said Dr. Jack Kittinger, Senior Director, Global Fisheries and Aquaculture Program at Conservation International. “Our strengths in policy reform and capacity development, together with the market and entrepreneurship expertise of Ocean Outcomes creates a powerful alliance that will improve ecosystem stewardship and support sustainable livelihoods globally.”

This alliance will combine Conservation International’s worldwide success working with communities and governments to transform fisheries towards sustainability using a three-tiered approach of 1) implementation of effective governance; 2) building community capacities and 3) alignment of incentives for sustainable harvesting with Ocean Outcomes’ expertise in fishery improvement, management, science and supply chain. 

“From a sustainability needs perspective, developing-world fisheries are highly complex. Approaches which leverage collective tools, strategies and relationships – such as those provided with our new partnership with Conservation International – broaden the scope of our toolbox so we can collectively better address fishery needs across the globe,” said Dick Jones, President and CEO at Ocean Outcomes.

Already, Conservation International has co-created assessment tools for evaluating fisheries’ social sustainability performance and local fishers’ organizational capacities, linking these with Ocean Outcomes’ co-developed Rapid Assessment Tool for Fisheries Improvement projects (FIPs) and market and supply chain understanding. This ensures that fisheries pursuing social, environmental and economic improvements can work through a consistent and familiar process.

Conservation International and Ocean Outcomes have been on the ground together in Costa Rica, working to understand and advance improvement of socioeconomic and environmental viability of queen croaker fisheries in the Gulf of Nicoya. They are also in Suriname, assessing the actions needed to improve the sustainability of small-scale finfish fisheries. Currently, both organizations are developing joint projects in Mexico and the Galápagos Islands, among others.

Find out more information about Conservation International’s work in sustainable fisheries here.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About Ocean Outcomes
Ocean Outcomes is an international organization that works with local communities, fisheries, and the seafood industry to improve the environmental, social, and economic sustainability of fisheries and aquaculture operations. Learn more at oceanoutcomes.org