Abstract: Conservation International Senior Vice President for Global Policy and Government Relations James Roth released the following statement today on the Save Our Seas Act 2.0 (S. 1982) ​Arlington, Va.…
Abstract: Conservation International Senior Vice President for Global Policy and Government Relations James Roth released the following statement today on the Save Our Seas Act 2.0 (S. 1982)
​Arlington, Va. (June 26, 2019) – Conservation International Senior Vice President for Global Policy and Government Relations James Roth released the following statement today on the Save Our Seas Act 2.0 (S. 1982):

The Save our Seas Act 2.0 is a welcome bipartisan effort to confront the marine debris crisis through alignment and innovation. It establishes funding for cleanup response, innovation for a circular economy, enables smarter disposal, and prioritizes marine pollution in future international negotiations. For the life-essential benefits of healthy oceans, including breathable air and a stable climate, this is a welcome demonstration in US leadership.

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The Save Our Seas Act 2.0, introduced by US Senators Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), Dan Sullivan (R-AK), and Bob Menendez (D-NJ), aims to reduce the production of plastic waste, repurpose plastic waste already in existence for additional use to keep it out of the Earth’s oceans, spur innovation and tackle the plastic debris problem on a global scale. Also, Senators Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Tom Carper (D-DE), Rob Portman (R-OH), Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Chris Murphy (D-CT) sponsored the bill. 

Roughly 8 million metrics tons of plastic waste is annually mismanaged, thrown into oceans and has broken down into the marine food chain so far that it has been found in the Mariana Trench, the deepest known point in the ocean on Earth.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “Drop in the Ocean”“My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

 

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Abstract: A team of scientists, led by Conservation International's Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) in coordination with the Government of Honduras, conducted a three-week research expedition following the discovery of ancient…
Abstract: A team of scientists, led by Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) in coordination with the Government of Honduras, conducted a three-week research expedition following the discovery of ancient ruins.
​An Ecological SWAT Team Finds a “Lost City” Now Serves as Refuge for Rare Wildlife

Arlington, Va. (June 20, 2019) – A team of scientists, led by Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) in coordination with the Government of Honduras, conducted a three-week research expedition following the discovery of ancient ruins at a site deep within the Mosquitia rainforest known as the “Lost City of the Monkey God” or the “White City.”

The results of that survey, published today, reveals the ancient settlement is encompassed by a pristine, thriving ecosystem teeming with rare and unique species, including new species and species once thought to be extinct. 

The site, dubbed the “Lost City of the Monkey God”, is the subject of a movie and book by the same name and was hidden for centuries within a remote valley, guarded on all sides by steep ridges, in one of the world’s densest jungles.

Scientists found an extraordinary ecosystem rich with wildlife and plants, including:

  • 22 species that have never before been recorded in Honduras, and many, such as the Great Green Macaw, which are endangered or extremely rare.
  • Three remarkable species rediscoveries:
    • The Pale-faced Bat, which had not been reported in Honduras for more than 75 years,
    • The False Tree Coral Snake, which had not been reported in Honduras since 1965,
    • A tiger beetle, which had only ever been recorded in Nicaragua and was believed to be extinct.
  • A livebearing poeciliid fish called a molly, which appears to be new to science.
  • A thriving population of white-lipped peccaries, a pig-like species extremely sensitive to deforestation and degradation, and which no longer found throughout much of Central America because they require vast areas of intact forest to survive.
  • 58 species of plants from the survey have important uses by people, and we observed species typically associated with pre-Hispanic settlements of Mesoamerica, such as cacao and cacao de monte
  • A high abundance of peccaries and other prey species (indicating low hunting pressure) support a complete community of carnivores, including large cats such as jaguar and puma; few places remain that harbor this full spectrum of species where intact ecological links maintain a healthy, balanced ecosystem.
  • In total, the team documented 246 species of butterflies and moths, 30 bats, 57 amphibians and reptiles, as well as numerous plants, fishes, mammals and insects.

“Our team of scientists were shocked at the discovery of tremendously rich biodiversity, including many rare and threatened species. The “White City” is one of the few areas remaining in Central America where ecological and evolutionary processes remain intact,” said Trond Larsen, Director of Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program.

“Overall, our findings demonstrate that the area is of global environmental as well as archaeological significance,” Larsen continued. “Armed with this knowledge, stakeholders can now begin to design and implement conservation strategies to protect this critical ecosystem. One of the main reasons we found such high species richness and abundance of threatened and wide-ranging species (e.g., peccaries) is that the forests around the White City remain pristine, unlike much of the region. This makes the area a high conservation priority for maintaining the broader landscape connectivity that is essential for the long-term persistence of biodiversity through Central America”

Dr. John Polisar, Coordinator of the Wildlife Conservation Society Jaguar Program and a member of the RAP expedition team said, “We have been doing field work in the indigenous territories of La Moskitia for 14 years, and this site stood out as being simply gorgeous.  However, what really made it leap out was its very complete assemblage of native large mammals, something becoming all too rare in these regions.  Because of its presently intact forests and fauna the area is of exceptionally high conservation value.  It merits energetic and vigilant protection so its beauty and wildlife persist into the future.”

The RAP team was commissioned by Bill and Laurie Benenson, along with explorer Steve Elkins (who led the original search and discovery of the archaeological site) and the support of the President of Honduras, Juan Orlando Hernández, to understand the area’s biodiversity and help the country’s government develop policies and strategies to protect it. Additional partners include the Government of Honduras, Washington State University, Wildlife Conservation Society,  Zamorano University and National Autonomous University of Honduras.

In light of the archeological and scientific findings, President Hernández initiated the Kaha Kamasa Foundation to promote ongoing scientific research and to increase monitoring and protection of the rainforest surrounding the archaeological sites at the “White City.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “Drop in the Ocean”“My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Abstract: Conservation International and ELLE co-hosted their first joint gala this evening in Los Angeles. ​Los Angeles, Calif. (June 8, 2019) – Conservation International and ELLE co-hosted their first joint…
Abstract: Conservation International and ELLE co-hosted their first joint gala this evening in Los Angeles.
​Los Angeles, Calif. (June 8, 2019) – Conservation International and ELLE co-hosted their first joint gala this evening in Los Angeles. The evening, themed “Women On a Mission,” honored female leaders and organizations whose work protects nature for the benefit of people and unveiled the July 2019 issue of ELLE, which is dedicated to women in conservation. 

Video, photographs of the evening are available here.

Conservation International and ELLE were joined by presenting sponsors NIKE and HP Inc.

The evening began with remarks from Conservation International’s CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan and ELLE Editor-in-Chief Nina Garcia.

Honorees included: Kering, the global luxury group whose brands include Gucci and Saint Laurent. ELLE and Conservation International presented Kering with the Sustainability Leadership Award. The award marks the first joint sustainability award by ELLE and Conservation International. Marie-Claire Daveu, Kering’s Chief Sustainability Officer, accepted the award for her leadership within the organization. The award was presented by Ms. Garcia.

Conservation International also presented the Global Conservation Hero Award to Givaudan, the world’s largest flavor and fragrance manufacturer, based in Switzerland. Emily Bond, Head of Fine Fragrances North America, accepted on behalf of the organization. The prestigious award recognizes the company’s commitment to forest conservation, particularly to mitigate the impacts of climate change and to empower local communities. The award was presented by Jennifer Morris, President of Conservation International.

The evening also celebrated the work of communities in Indonesia, particularly West Papua. West Papua recently passed historic legislation to name itself the country’s first Conservation Province. This first-of-its-kind legal framework puts sustainable development and conservation—especially for tropical forests and the unique Bird’s Head Seascape—at the forefront of any economic activity or development. West Papua’s Governor, Dominggus Mandacan, accepted the second Global Conservation Hero Award of the night on behalf of the people of West Papua. The Ambassador from Indonesia, Mahendra Siregar, also attended. The award was presented by Sanjayan.

Notable attendees included actress Shailene Woodley, who delivered the evening’s closing remarks, Lana Condor, Ian Somerhalder and Nikki Reed, Laurie Hernandez, Ibtihaj Muhammad, Jason Ritter and Melanie Lynskey, Kota Eberhardt, Zoë Lillian, Maye and Tosca Musk, Lorenza Izzo, Ashleigh Cummings, Natalie Morales, Mena Massoud, Mishel Prada, Diana Silvers and Kate Siegel.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “Drop in the Ocean”“My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube

Abstract: The Costa Rican government issued a precedent-setting decree today that legally protects its vast coral ecosystems from harmful human activities. ​On the occasion of World Oceans Day, Costa Rica…
Abstract: The Costa Rican government issued a precedent-setting decree today that legally protects its vast coral ecosystems from harmful human activities.
​On the occasion of World Oceans Day, Costa Rica has issued a decree to protect its vast coral ecosystems. We congratulate the government for taking this important step and setting a legal precedent for the protection of marine environments in the region.

Arlington, Va. (June 8, 2019) – The Costa Rican government issued a precedent-setting decree today that legally protects its vast coral ecosystems from harmful human activities. Following years of work on the issue, Conservation International and the Interamerican Association for Environmental Defense (AIDA) celebrate this important instrument for the conservation of these fragile and vital marine environments. 

“We are very pleased with this advance, promoted by the Vice Ministry of Water and Seas, which guarantees the survival of coral reefs and the various species that contribute to their conservation—species like the parrotfish, which feed on the algae that can deprive reefs of oxygen,” said Gladys Martínez, Senior Attorney of AIDA’s Marine Biodiversity and Coastal Protection Program.

The decree provides a series of measures the government must adopt in order to preserve reef ecosystems and the species that depend on them, threatened by a combination of unsustainable use, climate change, inadequate management, and invasive species.

The measures include: the inclusion of reefs as State Natural Heritage sites; the creation and implementation of science-based strategies and policies to confront the effects of climate change; and the restoration of degraded reefs. The law also prohibits harmful activities like the extraction and commercialization of reefs, dumping of waste, and anchoring.

“It’s our hope that the legal precedent established by this decree will be replicated in other countries of the Americas that, like Costa Rica, are bound by international treaties to safeguard their corals,” said Magie Rodríguez, an AIDA Attorney. “In the coming years, we will be closely monitoring the decree’s implementation.”

In 2012, AIDA and Conservation International joined forces with national experts to prepare a report detailing the economic and environmental benefits of corals, urging the creation of legislation in Costa Rica to protect them.

AIDA also supported the Vice Ministry in the preparation of the decree based on the organization’s experience in international law and understanding of regulations in other countries of the region.

“Costa Rica is a nation privileged by the dimensions of its marine spaces and biodiversity. The coral systems are incredibly productive, but they are also threatened by human activity and climate change,” said Marco A. Quesada Alpízar, Director of Conservation International – Costa Rica. “By taking action on this issue, Costa Rica has assumed responsibility for the conservation and management of its marine ecosystems, and has set an example that can be replicated in other countries.”

The decree answers a years-long call for Costa Rica to comply with international obligations and protect its threatened marine ecosystems. Scientific studies have shown that a large part of the coral reefs in the country are at great risk due to human activities including land-based pollution and destructive fishing practices. Their conservation must be a priority.

“This decree fills an important gap in the regulation of coral reefs in Costa Rica. It recognizes, once again, that marine resources provide people with services and well-being, which requires they be adequately protected and managed,” explained Quesada.

“Costa Rica is globally recognized for its ecotourism and natural richness,” added Ana Gloria Guzmán, Senior Manager Sustainable Fisheries and Marine Protected Areas at Conservation International’s Oceans Center. “With this decree, the nation is setting an example about the protection and management of essential marine ecosystems as a means to ensure the health of the oceans and safeguard the well-being of coastal communities that depend on the services they provide.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “Drop in the Ocean”“My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube

Sustainable-Coffee-Challenge-Welcomes-Nine-New-Partners

Abstract: The Sustainable Coffee Challenge today announced 9 new partners – Kahlúa, Philz Coffee, Kauai Coffee Company, Blanchard's Coffee Roasting Co., RGC Coffee, Westrock Coffee Company, Qahwah Club, Strategies for…
Abstract: The Sustainable Coffee Challenge today announced 9 new partners – Kahlúa, Philz Coffee, Kauai Coffee Company, Blanchard’s Coffee Roasting Co., RGC Coffee, Westrock Coffee Company, Qahwah Club, Strategies for International Development, and Bellsystem24.
​Challenge Reaches 125 Total Partners

Arlington, Va. (June 6, 2019) – The Sustainable Coffee Challenge today announced 9 new partners – Kahlúa, Philz Coffee, Kauai Coffee Company, Blanchard’s Coffee Roasting Co., RGC Coffee, Westrock Coffee Company, Qahwah Club, Strategies for International Development, and Bellsystem24. They have joined the Challenge’s mission to make coffee the world’s first sustainable agricultural project and are among 125 partners including corporations, governments, NGOs and research organizations.

As part of its partnership, Kauai Coffee Company has made a commitment to increase the sustainability of its soil use on its orchard land area. Currently, 8-10% of its 3,100 acres use a combination of thermophilic compost and cover crop for soil remediation. By 2022, Kauai Coffee Company hopes to have more than 30% of orchard land use applying this combination.

Westrock Coffee, a vertically integrated coffee company, ethically sources their coffee from smallholder farmers all over the world. They are committed to providing farmers with tools and training, financing, market risk management, quality control and financial management training. Westrock’s unique business model has created transparent supply chains extending from origin to consumer.

Additionally, RGC Coffee is working towards the long term viability of coffee by fostering gender equity, farmworkers’ dignity and climate change resilience through a verifiable and measurable approaches that involve all stakeholders in the supply chain.

Meanwhile, Strategies for International Development is committed to maximizing the income and profitability for coffee-farming families in Guatemala in a sustainable and environmental manner. 

Bellsystem24 is planning to achieve sustainability through the coffee it serves and its in-house café expansion. It launched its first in-house café in February 2019 where all the coffee served from Mi Cafeto was sustainable. Bellsystem24 expects to establish more than 4 in-house cafés by 2021, which will increase its volume of sustainable coffee distribution.

“Reaching 125 partners in the Challenge is an incredible milestone. We’re encouraged to see that these partners publicly stated 6 commitments to coffee sustainability upon joining. These new commitments send a strong signal of increased sector transparency and accountability, facets of the Challenge that grow more relevant as we jointly tackle the current coffee price crisis and climate variability. These commitments combined with the Challenge’s urgency for collective action will get us closer to making coffee sustainable,” said Bambi Semroc, Vice President of Sustainable Markets and Strategy at Conservation International.

The Sustainable Coffee Challenge, conceived by Conservation International and Starbucks and launched during the Paris climate meetings in 2015, is uniting players from across the coffee industry – growers, traders, roasters, retailers, governments and NGOs. It works to stimulate greater demand for sustainable coffee while forming partnerships to find and scale up programs promoting improved livelihoods, nature conservation and a continued supply of coffee.

The Sustainable Coffee Challenge engages in collaborative efforts with its partners across four networks to achieve its mission: scaling up sustainable sourcing; farm renovation and rehabilitation; improved labor practices and supply and mapping and monitoring of coffee and forests.

To join as a partner, contact Valerie Beard, Manager, Sustainable Coffee Challenge at vbeard@conservation.org.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn
more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “Drop in the Ocean”“My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About the Sustainable Coffee Challenge
The Sustainable Coffee Challenge convenes, unites and urges the coffee sector and conservation partners across the industry to spur the actions and investments necessary to make coffee the first sustainable agriculture product in the world. The Challenge is committed to stimulating demand for sustainable coffee across the value chain, from the policymaking level to the final consumer. By encouraging demand for sustainable coffee, it leads to investments that enable the transition to a sustainable production and ensuring the coffee we drink is a sustainable product.

Abstract: A new study​ from Conservation International published today in Science finds an alarming increase in the rollback of legal protections to protected areas at a time when the preservation…
Abstract: A new study​ from Conservation International published today in Science finds an alarming increase in the rollback of legal protections to protected areas at a time when the preservation of nature is more important than ever.
​New Global Study by Conservation International Documents Global Rollbacks to Protected Areas

Arlington, Va. (May 30, 2019) – A new study​ from Conservation International published today in Science finds an alarming increase in the rollback of legal protections to protected areas at a time when the preservation of nature is more important than ever.

“One of the most effective, time-tested strategies in conservation are areas protected by law. But just because an area is ‘declared’ protected doesn’t make it so. The work is just beginning when these areas are declared,” Dr. Michael Mascia, Senior Vice President at Conservation International’s Moore Center for Science.

The study documents that governments have removed more than 500,000 km2 from protected areas and downgraded protections for an additional 1.65 million km2 to allow greater human activities.

According to the study, which was based on published and previously unpublished data, the majority of the rollbacks are associated with industrial-scale development. This is despite ongoing alarming reports about the state of nature, such as the recent UN IPBES report that found nearly 1 million species on the verge of extinction.

Legal rollbacks of protected areas can accelerate forest loss, fragmentation, and carbon emissions. The study is the most comprehensive examination to date on rollbacks of environmental protections affecting national parks and protected areas globally.

Key findings include:

  • Rollbacks have been happening for decades but are accelerating: There have been at least 3,700 rollbacks across more than 3,000 protected areas since 1872 – yet 78% of those rollbacks have taken place in the last eighteen years, between 2000-2018.  64% have been enacted since 2010.
  • Rollbacks by the U.S. and Brazil are of particular concern:
    • In the U.S., 90% of proposed rollbacks have taken place since 2000; 99% of those were associated with industrial-scale development.
    • The paper finds that President Trump’s downsizing of Bears Ears and Grand-Staircase Escalante national monuments were the largest reductions in U.S. history, reducing the protected areas by 85% (4,657 km²) and 51% (3,489 km²), respectively. Taken together, the downsizing amounts to an area about twice the size of Rhode Island.
    • In Brazil, 84% of enacted and proposed rollbacks have taken place since 2000.
    • Brazil’s proposed rollbacks total an area about the size of North Dakota (183,164 km2) – and comprise 87% of the total proposed rollback area across the nine Amazonian countries.
    • 48% of legal removal of protections were enacted or proposed between 2010-2017, primarily to authorize hydropower dams.
    • Of all rollbacks documented across the Amazonian countries, Brazil’s comprise 32% of the total area.Governments in seven Amazonian countries enacted 440 rollbacks of 245 state-designated protected areas between 1961-2017.
  • Governments in seven Amazonian countries enacted 440 rollbacks of 245 state-designated protected areas between 1961-2017.
  • Rollbacks in seven Amazonian countries are widespread, with 75% of ecoregions and 21% of key biodiversity areas currently or potentially affected.

Other Country Findings of Interest:

  • Australia: The study found more than 1,500 protected area changes, resulting in the removal of 13,000 km2 from conservation areas and undermining protection for an additional 400,000 km2.
  • Suriname and Guyana: The study found no enacted rollback events in Suriname or Guyana.
  • United Kingdom: The study found at least 61 rollback events covering 46,090 km2. All 61 rollbacks were the result of a 2015 authorization of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) below protected areas.

The study’s findings sound a warning on the future of the Amazon. “The Amazon rainforest is one of the world’s most critical tools in the fight against climate change. This study demonstrates that legislation to conserve our rainforests doesn’t always translate into enduring protection. As we work to protect the future of the Amazon, in Brazil and across the region faced with a choice of either development or protection, we must understand the ecological and financial implications of downsizing protected areas and opening them up for development,” said Bruno Coutinho, PhD, Director of Knowledge Management, Conservation International Brazil and co-author.

“We are facing two global environmental crises: Biodiversity loss and climate change. To address both, governments have established protected areas with the intent of conserving nature in perpetuity. Yet our research shows that protected areas can be rolled back and are not necessarily permanent. Lost protections can accelerate forest loss and carbon emissions – putting our climate and global biodiversity at greater risk,” said Rachel Golden Kroner, Conservation International Social Scientist, lead author of the study and PhD candidate at George Mason University.

The bottom line? “Protected areas are one of the most important tools in the conservation toolbox, but establishment is not the end of the story,” says Golden Kroner.

The study notes that protected area boundaries, for instance, may change to restore rights to indigenous communities or respond to climate change, but that globally, most rollback processes are related to industrial-scale development.

“Rolling back protected areas should be as difficult as it is to establish them,” said Golden Kroner. “Processes to roll back protected areas should mirror how protected areas are established in the first place, so that they are transparent, evidence-based, participatory and responsible.”

The technical term for these reductions of protected areas is PADDD, which means Protected Area Downgrading (relaxing restrictions), Downsizing (reducing boundaries) and Degazettement (eliminating protections).

The study cautions that global figures presented are conservative estimates of rollbacks, or PADDD events, as legal documents remain inaccessible in many countries.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “Drop in the Ocean”“My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

About George Mason University
George Mason University is Virginia’s largest public research university. Located near Washington, D.C., Mason enrolls more than 37,000 students from 130 countries and all 50 states. Mason has grown rapidly over the last half-century and is recognized for its innovation and entrepreneurship, remarkable diversity, and commitment to accessibility. Mason’s interdisciplinary Environmental Science and Policy department in the College of Science spans the domains of the natural and social sciences to provide unique, flexible undergraduate and graduate learning experiences using state-of-the-art research facilities and diverse field sites. Our graduates and faculty are active in the formulation and implementation of sustainability policies and solutions in government, industry, and nonprofit organizations. Mason recently announced its Institute for a Sustainable Earth to connect the Mason sustainability programs, policy, and research efforts with other communities, policy-makers, businesses and organizations–so that, together, we can more effectively address the world’s pressing sustainability and resilience challenges.​a

Abstract: Conservation International and ELLE are coming together to co-host their first joint gala, taking place at Milk Studios in Los Angeles, California on Saturday, June 8. ​Gala Will Honor…
Abstract: Conservation International and ELLE are coming together to co-host their first joint gala, taking place at Milk Studios in Los Angeles, California on Saturday, June 8.
Gala Will Honor Leaders from Givaudan, Kering, ELLE July Cover Star, and Highlight the Work of Women and Communities in Indonesia
Gala is First in a Series of Initiatives Between the Two Organizations, Calling Attention to Conservation and the Environmental Leadership of Women Around the World

Arlington, VA (May 29, 2019) – Conservation International and ELLE are coming together to co-host their first joint gala, taking place at Milk Studios in Los Angeles, California on Saturday, June 8. The evening, themed “Women On a Mission,” will honor female leaders and organizations whose work protects nature for the benefit of people and unveil the July 2019 issue of ELLE, which is dedicated to women in conservation. 

“Women are contributing profound knowledge, perspectives, and leadership to conservation. At Conservation International, we know from experience that direct participation and decision-making by women in conservation results in stronger and more equitable outcomes for communities around the world,” said Jennifer Morris, president of Conservation International. “Women are disproportionately affected by the climate crisis and they are powerful agents to halting it. With ELLE, we recognize such efforts and call for women to play central roles in all aspects of managing and safeguarding nature and building a resilient, sustainable future.”

The event takes place as a string of recent scientific reports have revealed the catastrophic changes now taking place due climate change. Just this month, the U.N. warned that one million species are now at risk of extinction due to human activity. An equally dire report, released in October, detailed that humans now have a window of about 10 years to curb carbon emissions to mitigate the worst effects of climate change.

According to the U.N., 80 percent of the people displaced by climate change are women.  As the “Women on a Mission” event will detail, women are also on the frontlines of finding solutions to this global challenge.

“The partnership between ELLE and Conservation International is about more than just fashion or sustainability—it’s about the wellbeing of women around the world,” said Nina Garcia, Editor-in-Chief of ELLE. “The July issue of ELLE is dedicated to conservation and will include four separate covers honoring icons in the fashion industry who advocate for conservation. We partnered with Conservation International to celebrate and raise awareness of women making a difference in climate change — from marine biologists to supermodels. We have a responsibility to help preserve the world’s natural resources and lift up the individuals who are striving to build a better future for us all.”

The event marks the first in a series of efforts between ELLE and Conservation International. One of the cover stars, which will be revealed next week, will receive a special award from Conservation International for her commitment to making a difference in her community and the world. After the evening, the partnership will continue through a variety of initiatives to call attention to climate change and nature.

Conservation International and ELLE are joined by NIKE and HP Inc. – two presenting sponsors of this year’s event.

“It’s a critical time to come together as an industry to seriously tackle climate change – with urgency,” said Noel Kinder, NIKE Chief Sustainability Office. “Given the existential threat we face, no one is going to solve the climate crisis on their own and we need to make it a collaborative effort, where together, we can codify the best practices and push on as a collective.”

“HP is honored to support tonight’s gala hosted by Conservation International and ELLE to celebrate women leaders making a positive impact on our planet and communities,” said Karen Kahn, Chief Communications Officer at HP. “To tackle the social and environmental issues of our time, brands must stand for more than the products they sell. When businesses and NGOs come together with a common goal, they empower people and drive systemic change.”

At the gala, ELLE and Conservation International will present the Sustainability Leadership Award to Kering, the global Luxury group whose brands include Gucci and Saint Laurent. The award marks the first joint sustainability award by ELLE and Conservation International. Marie-Claire Daveu, Kering’s Chief Sustainability Officer, will accept the award for her leadership within the organization.

“Ms. Daveu has led an ambitious 2025 strategy for sustainability at Kering,” said Nina Garcia, who will present the award. “That strategy includes a 40 percent reduction in its environmental footprint and a 50 percent reduction in its greenhouse gas emissions. I’ve heard Ms. Daveu say Kering’s commitment to sustainability is more than a necessity, but a duty. We want to honor that dedication.”

Conservation International will also present the Global Conservation Hero Award to Givaudan, the world’s largest flavor and fragrance manufacturer, based in Switzerland. Emily Bond, Head of Fine Fragrances North America, will accept on behalf of the organization. The prestigious award recognizes the company’s commitment to forest conservation, particularly to mitigate the impacts of climate change and to empower local communities.

Givaudan and Conservation International have partnered for 12 years in the Caura Basin of Venezuela. Through the Conservation Stewards Program, Givaudan helps to preserve almost 366,000 acres of forest while supporting local livelihoods. The company works with indigenous families, such as those in the Aripao community, to curb illegal hunting in exchange for wages to patrol the area, as well as better access to markets for non-timber forest products such as the tonka bean and copaiba oil.

“Twelve years ago, it wasn’t nearly as popular as it is today for a corporation—especially one that’s not always in the public eye—to protect biodiversity and support indigenous populations,” said Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International. “But even back then, Givaudan didn’t just care about what was popular—they cared about what was right. Their foresight to promote community-based solutions has not only protected the region’s natural resources, it has enhanced local communities’ quality of life for more than a decade. We’re delighted to recognize this work, and bring attention to a bigger conversation about products, beauty, and thoughtful ways companies can work with nature.”

Givaudan’s Head of Fine Fragrances North America, Emily Bond, who will accept the award at the gala, said: “We are deeply honoured to accept this award from Conservation International which is testament to the team’s efforts in supporting the local communities in exchange for their help in conserving the forests. This also ensures that we have a constant supply of tonka beans, which is an important and precious ingredient used in crafting exquisite smelling perfumes.”

The evening will also celebrate the work of communities in Indonesia, particularly West Papua. West Papua recently passed historic legislation to name itself the country’s first Conservation Province. This first-of-its-kind legal framework puts sustainable development and conservation—especially for tropical forests and the unique Bird’s Head Seascape—at the forefront of any economic activity or development. Meity Mongdong, Director of Conservation International’s Bird’s Head Seascape Program, will deliver remarks highlighting the work done in Indonesia, and the positive impact it has had on women and communities. She, along with West Papua’s Governor, Dominggus Mandacan, will accept the second Global Conservation Hero Award of the night on behalf of the people of West Papua. The Ambassador from Indonesia, Mahendra Siregar, will also attend and help celebrate West Papua’s people.

As industry leaders tackling some of today’s most pressing environmental and social challenges, both presenting sponsors, NIKE and HP, are deeply connected to the evening’s mission. Nearly 75% of all NIKE products contain some recycled material, an effort that has helped to divert 6.4 billion plastic bottles from landfills since 2010.  In addition, Nike has targeted to source 100% renewable energy across its owned and operated global operations by 2025.  NIKE’s efforts also include addressing barriers to girls’ participation in sport through new community partnerships and access to products to help girls play with confidence.  Through Made to Play, which has helped more than 16.5 million kids get active, NIKE has engaged with more than 80 organizations around the world and supported more than 21,000 community coaches to help kids enjoy play and sport. This past year, NIKE reached nearly 100,000 coaches through Nike-supported programming, with a specific focus on increasing the number of female coaches to help inspire young girls, who have so much potential to move the world.

“NIKE exists to serve athletes and all athletes need fresh air, clean water and safe playing fields to thrive,” said Kinder. “That means sustainability is a critical part of our work. From design to delivery, sustainability is embedded in everything we do at NIKE, Inc.”

Sustainable Impact guides how HP innovates new products, cultivates a diverse and inclusive workplace and operates in the world. The company has been a pioneer in the use of recycled content, working with Planet Partners over the last 27 years to enable customers in over 60 countries to recycle HP ink and toner cartridges for free. Since 2000, HP has used more than 199 million pounds of recycled plastic into 3.9B HP Original ink and toner cartridges, even diverting 716,000 pounds of plastic from reaching the ocean – the equivalent of more than 25 million plastic bottles. Most recently, the company made a $2M investment in a plastic washing line in Haiti which will create more than 1,000 new income opportunities locally. HP has also been recognized as a leader in reinventing the standard for diversity and inclusion, rated one of the best workplaces for women and boasts diversity stats that sit well above the industry averages.

​About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “Drop in the Ocean”“My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube

About ELLE
ELLE is the No. 1 fashion magazine brand in the world, with 45 editions, 34 websites and more than 158 supplements worldwide. The ELLE U.S. brand reaches over 29 million influential readers, users, fans and followers across all platforms and inspires women to explore, cultivate and celebrate their personal style in all aspects of their lives. ELLE is owned by the Lagardere Active group (France), and ELLE U.S. is published by Hearst Magazines, a unit of Hearst, a leading global, diversified media, information and services company. Hearst attracts more readers of monthly magazines than any other publisher. Hearst Magazines’ print and digital assets reach 155 million readers and site visitors each month—two-thirds of all millennials, and over 80% of Gen Z and millennial women in the country (source: 2019 comScore/MRI 11-18/S18). With more than 25 brands in the U.S., the company publishes over 300 editions and 245 websites around the world. For more information visit ELLE.com, or follow ELLE on Twitter (@ELLEmagazine), Facebook (facebook.com/ELLEmagazine), Instagram (@ELLEUSA), Pinterest (pinterest.com/ELLE) or Tumblr (ELLE.tumblr.com).

About NIKE, Inc.
NIKE, Inc., based near Beaverton, Ore., is the world’s leading designer, marketer and distributor of authentic athletic footwear, apparel, equipment and accessories for a wide variety of sports and fitness activities. Wholly-owned NIKE, Inc. subsidiary brands include Converse, which designs, markets and distributes athletic lifestyle footwear, apparel and accessories; and Hurley, which designs, markets and distributes surf and youth lifestyle footwear, apparel and accessories. For more information, Nike’s earnings releases and other financial information are available at http://investors.nike.com. Individuals can also visit http://news.nike.com and follow @Nike.

About HP
HP Inc. creates technology that makes life better for everyone, everywhere. Through our portfolio of printers, PCs, mobile devices, solutions, and services, we engineer experiences that amaze. More information about HP Inc. is available at http://www.hp.com.

About Givaudan
Givaudan is the global leader in the creation of flavours and fragrances. In close collaboration with food, beverage, consumer product and fragrance partners, Givaudan develops tastes and scents that delight consumers the world over. With a passion to understand consumers’ preferences and a relentless drive to innovate, Givaudan is at the forefront of creating flavours and fragrances that ‘engage your senses’. The Company achieved sales of CHF 4.7 billion in 2016. Headquartered in Switzerland with local presence in over 95 locations, the Company has more than 10,000 employees worldwide. Givaudan invites you to discover more at www.givaudan.com.

About Kering
A global Luxury group, Kering manages the development of a series of renowned Houses in Fashion, Leather Goods, Jewelry and Watches: Gucci, Saint Laurent, Bottega Veneta, Balenciaga, Alexander McQueen, Brioni, Boucheron, Pomellato, DoDo, Qeelin, Ulysse Nardin, Girard-Perregaux, as well as Kering Eyewear. By placing creativity at the heart of its strategy, Kering enables its Houses to set new limits in terms of their creative expression while crafting tomorrow’s Luxury in a sustainable and responsible way. We capture these beliefs in our signature: “Empowering Imagination”. In 2018, Kering had nearly 35,000 employees and revenue of €13.7 billion. www.kering.com.

 

 

 

 

 

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Drop-in-the-Ocean-debut-at-Cal-Academy

​Arlington, Va. (May 24, 2019) – A new social virtual reality project from Conservation International allows participants to experience the wonders of the ocean — and the plastic pollution that…

Arlington, Va. (May 24, 2019) – A new social virtual reality project from Conservation International allows participants to experience the wonders of the ocean — and the plastic pollution that threatens it — from the viewpoint of marine life. The project, “Drop in the Ocean,” will debut at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, Califonia from May 24 – July 14, following its premiere last month at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Narrated by explorers, filmmakers and environmental advocates Philippe and Ashlan Cousteau and built from the photo archive of Academy Award-winning micro-photographer Peter Parks, “Drop in the Ocean” shrinks participants down to about 2 inches tall as they hitch a ride on a jellyfish to encounter the mysteries of the deep ocean and directly experience the plastic pollution crisis as sea life does every day.

Designed as a 7-minute group interactive VR experience in a custom-built space by New York-based museum design firm Thinc, it brings up to four participants together at a time into an open, physical space, allowing full freedom of movement while creating an atmosphere of shared adventure and knowledge gathering. The project is experienced through HP’s new lightweight, high-resolution Reverb headsets. Renowned British electronic producer Gold Panda composes an original score that captures the emotions of wonder and adventure in the experience.

“The result is a wildly unique voyage, where the secrets of the deep ocean are revealed and human impacts on marine health are felt and confronted, not just seen,” said Philippe Cousteau. “This experience helps participants discover how each of us is linked to this vast and amazing resource. From tiny plankton that provides two out of every three breathes of oxygen we breathe to an enormous whale shark that will amaze you, Drop in the Ocean allows anyone to experience the stunning diversity of our ocean and gain an understanding of why we urgently need to take action to protect it.” added Ashlan Cousteau.

Conservation International thanks its generous partner SC Johnson and is grateful to work in association with Vulcan Productions. In-kind technology support was provided by HP.

The ocean-themed immersive project comes at a time when the world is grappling with a global plastic pollution crisis. Every minute, the equivalent of a truckload of plastic enters our oceans, endangering marine life of all kinds. The UN estimates that ingestion of plastic kills 1 million marine birds and 100,000 marine animals each year. Scientists predict that the weight of ocean plastics will exceed the combined weight of all of the fish in the seas by 2050.

“Every year, 18 billion pounds of plastic waste ends up in our oceans. Our oceans are drowning in plastic pollution,” said Executive Producer and Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan. “While the world is waking up to this global crisis, this project truly helps us to see and feel the impact on all of the ocean’s living creatures. We need to move fast in order to save them and the waters that sustain life on Earth.”

“At a time when our world’s ocean is facing unprecedented threats, the need to educate, engage, and inspire the public to work towards solutions to sustain these critical ecosystems has never been more important,” says Dr. Elizabeth Bagley, the Academy’s Director of Sustainability and content advisor for Drop in the Ocean. “We’re incredibly excited to partner with Conservation International and Vision3 to immerse Academy visitors in this one-of-a-kind VR experience. While not everyone has access to explore the depths of the ocean, this cutting-edge technology gives everyone an opportunity to marvel at the wonder of our ocean and see first-hand why it’s worth protecting.”

“Such is the scale of plastic pollution in our oceans, that we must come together to face the problem as a massive force. Right from the beginning, we built this project around the principle of shared experience leading to collective activism,” said Creator and Vision3 Co-Founder Adam May. “We want audiences to come together as a team, and leave their lives on the shore behind — to dive deep below the surface to discover a remarkable natural kingdom.”

“The health of our oceans is critical for human life on this planet. We have to figure out a way to stop plastic from leaking into the ocean. I am optimistic we can find solutions if we all work together. This project from Conservation International is another step forward to raise awareness and continue the momentum on this important issue.” said Fisk Johnson, Chairman and CEO, SC Johnson.

“Our team is committed to telling stories that bring the magic of the world’s oceans to audiences everywhere, and to making clear there is a role for all of us to play in protecting the ocean’s future,” said Ruth Johnston, General Manager at Vulcan Productions. “Drop in the Ocean is truly unprecedented in its approach, combining beautiful storytelling with cutting edge virtual reality technology. We are proud to work with such trailblazers on this project, and look forward to sharing it around the world.”

Bay Area visitors can get a sneak peek of the experience during the Academy’s
NightLife event for adults 21+ happening on Thursday, May 23 from 6-10 pm. Tickets for “Drop in the Ocean” are available on-site at the museum for $12 per person and $10 for Academy members and are not included with daytime admission to the museum.

After its run at the California Academy of Sciences, “Drop in the Ocean” is expected to tour North America, the United Kingdom, Europe and the Middle East, with locations to be announced later this spring.

“Drop in The Ocean” is Conservation International’s fourth virtual reality project and its first social VR experience, following VR projects “Valen’s Reef,” “Under the Canopy” and most recently “My Africa.” “Drop in The Ocean” builds on Vision3’s exploration in using tactile VR experiences to provoke social impact and follows their 2018 Tribeca Immersive project “My Africa: Elephant Keeper,” also produced with Conservation International.

Additional collaborators for “Drop in the Ocean” include Earth Echo, Gold Panda, Mimic, Target 3D and Thinc Design.

Assets for media use:

About Conservation International

Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,” “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

About Vision3

Vision3 are industry leaders in 3D production for Hollywood Feature Films, award winning Natural History large format documentaries, and innovative virtual reality and augmented reality experiences. The London-based company was formed in 2008 and is the recipient of eight Lumiere Awards from the International Advanced Imaging Society, including best Stereography for WB’s “Gravity.” For more, go to vision3.tv.

About The California Academy of Sciences

The California Academy of Sciences is a renowned scientific and educational institution dedicated to exploring, explaining, and sustaining life on Earth. Based in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, it is home to a world-class aquarium, planetarium, and natural history museum—all under one living roof.

About SC Johnson

SC Johnson is a family company dedicated to innovative, high-quality products, excellence in the workplace and a long-term commitment to the environment and the communities in which it operates. Based in the USA, the company is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of household cleaning products and products for home storage, air care, pest control and shoe care, as well as professional products. It markets such well-known brands as GLADE®, KIWI®, OFF!®, PLEDGE®, RAID®, SCRUBBING BUBBLES®, SHOUT®, WINDEX® and ZIPLOC® in the U.S. and beyond, with brands marketed outside the U.S. including AUTAN®, BAYGON®, BRISE®, KABIKILLER®, KLEAR®, MR MUSCLE® and RIDSECT®. The 133-year-old company, which generates $10 billion in sales, employs approximately 13,000 people globally and sells products in virtually every country around the world. www.scjohnson.com

About Vulcan Productions

Vulcan Productions believes that storytelling can change the world. The company produces content that informs, inspires, and activates audiences. It builds movements that change behaviors, move policies and shift the trajectories of some of society’s most pressing challenges. Award-winning projects include Sundance Special Jury Award-winner
STEP, The Ivory Game, Unseen Enemy, Racing Extinction, Naledi: A Baby Elephant’s Tale, Academy Award®-nominated Body Team 12, Mind of a Giant, We the Economy,
We the Voters, Ocean Warriors, #ISurvivedEbola, Girl Rising and The Blues, and emerging media works Ghost Fleet VR, X-Ray Fashion, Drop in the Ocean and Guardians of the Kingdom, and immersive reality experiences for the Holodome at the Museum of Pop Culture: Songs of Infinity: Journey into a Black Hole, Justin Timberlake’s Montana: An Immersive Music Experience, Seattle Seahawks: The Art of the Play, and Death Planet Rescue. Upcoming projects include Ghost Fleet and The Cold Blue. For information on Vulcan Productions and its leadership in generating change through impact storytelling, visit vulcanproductions.com.

Abstract: Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan and Senior Climate Change Biology Scientist Dr. Lee Hannah released the following statements in reaction to today's release of the Summary for Policymakers…
Abstract: Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan and Senior Climate Change Biology Scientist Dr. Lee Hannah released the following statements in reaction to today’s release of the Summary for Policymakers from the IPBES Global Assessment
​Report details urgent need for nature ‘rescue plan’

Arlington, Va. (May 6, 2019) – Conservation International CEO Dr. M. Sanjayan and Senior Climate Change Biology Scientist Dr. Lee Hannah released the following statements in reaction to today’s release of the Summary for Policymakers from the Intergovernmental Panel for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) Global Assessment:

Dr. M. Sanjayan:

“This is a moment of reckoning. Today we learned there are over a thousand holes in the web sustaining human life. This report underscores what Conservation International has long voiced: It’s not just about the annihilation of natural wonder. This is about human survival. Without the life-essential services nature provides—breathable air, drinkable water, healthy oceans, a stable climate—humans will not survive. This report is another warning that irreversible disaster is on the horizon. The good news is we have a clear timeline, nature is resilient and, given the chance, will recover. Governments, businesses, and communities have just never fully aligned to let nature recover at the scale required. Now in this window of borrowed time, in this near-final state of grace, we must collaborate to make the transformation.”

Dr. Lee Hannah:

“Climate breakdown and the annihilation of the natural world are connected. As this report shows, it’s deadly. Species are moving because of climate change, but where do they go? They’re running into forests burning from deforestation for human land use.  The consequence is a massive die-off of insects and amphibians. Though the hour is late, there is still time to conserve natural habitats. The challenge is to do it as quickly as possible while accurately anticipating where. This is complicated because species are on the move due to climate change. But through the spatial planning for area conservation in response to climate change (SPARC), Conservation International has identified the right places. This report is sounding the alarm that we must establish conservation in those places right now.”

For media interviews, please contact Salma Bahramy at sbahramy@conservation.org or 917-543-7211.

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Abstract: A new study in Nature Communications today finds that cooperation between competing fishers can boost fish stocks on coral reefs. ​Cooperative Management of Coral Reef Fish Stocks is Critical…
Abstract: A new study in Nature Communications today finds that cooperation between competing fishers can boost fish stocks on coral reefs.
​Cooperative Management of Coral Reef Fish Stocks is Critical for Their Sustainable Use

Arlington, Va. (May 3, 2019) – A new study in Nature Communications today finds that cooperation between competing fishers can boost fish stocks on coral reefs. The study assesses the relationships between competing fishers, the fish species they hunt, and the reefs they depend on.

Dr. Jack​ Kittinger, Senior Director, Global Fisheries and Aquaculture at Conservation International’s Center for Oceans, and a team of authors interviewed 648 fishers and gathered underwater visual data of reef conditions across five reef fishing communities in Kenya.

They found that in the places where fishers communicated frequently with their competitors about fishing gear, locations, and rules that fish flourished in greater numbers and higher quality.

“This is likely because cooperative relationships among those who compete for a shared resource—such as fish—can create opportunities for rivals to seek mutually beneficial activities,” said Kittinger. “These relationships also help to build trust and can enable people to develop commitments to managing resources sustainably.”

“This is why communication is so critical. Developing sustained commitments, such as agreements on rules and setting up conflict resolution mechanisms, are key to local management of reefs,” added Kittinger.

“The relationships between people can have important consequences for the natural environments we depend on,” said Dr. Michele Barnes, lead author from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE) at James Cook University (JCU). “Our results suggest that when reef fishers—specifically those in competition with one another—communicate and cooperate over local environmental problems, they can improve the condition of coral reefs. This can lead to a better quality and quantity of reef fish.”

Professor Nick Graham, of Lancaster University, added, “Coral reefs globally have been severely degraded by climate change, and the pervasive impacts of poor water quality and heavy fishing pressure. The findings of our study provide important insights on how the condition of reef fish communities can be improved even on the reefs where they are fished.”

“The study demonstrates that the positive effect of communication does not necessarily appear when just anyone in a fishing community communicates – only when fishers competing over the same fish species communicate,” said co-author Dr. Örjan Bodin.

Many millions of people depend on coral reefs around the world. While coral reefs are one of the most productive and biologically diverse ecosystems on the planet, they are also rapidly degrading. This study highlights how cooperative local management is crucial to their sustainable use.

The study also has implications for other environmental problems. It advances a framework that can be applied to other complex environmental problems, where environmental conditions depend on the relationships between people and nature.

“Environmental problems are messy. They often involve multiple, interconnected resources and a lot of different people can be involved – each with their own unique relationship with nature,” said Dr. Barnes.

“Understanding who should cooperate with whom in different contexts and to address different types of environmental problems is becoming increasingly important,” said Dr. Bodin.

Graham said taking an interdisciplinary social–ecological approach to these situations allows for us to “better understand these complex interactions, and how they potentially contribute to important environmental outcomes, such as the amount of fish on a reef.”

About Conservation International
Conservation International uses science, policy and partnerships to protect the nature that people rely on for food, fresh water and livelihoods. Founded in 1987, Conservation International works in more than 30 countries on six continents to ensure a healthy, prosperous planet that supports us all. Learn more about Conservation International, the groundbreaking  “Nature Is Speaking” campaign and its series of virtual reality projects: “My Africa,”  “Under the Canopy” and “Valen’s Reef.” Follow Conservation International’s work on our Human Nature blog, FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.